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Jason McKesson committed 24f1a4d

Typo fixes.

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Documents/Illumination/Tutorial 12.xml

         <?dbhtml filename="Tut12 High Dynamic Range.html" ?>
         <title>High Dynamic Range</title>
         <para>In order to answer this question, we must first determine why flashlights appear
-            brighter at night than in the daytime? Much of the answer has to do with our
+            brighter at night than in the daytime. Much of the answer has to do with our
             eyes.</para>
         <para>The pupil is the hole in our eyes that allows light to pass through it; cameras call
             this hole the aperture. The hole is small, relative to the world, which helps with
             we multiplied the sun and ambient intensities by 3 in the last section, we were
             increasing the brightness by 3x. Multiplying the maximum intensity by 3 had the effect
             of reducing the overall brightness by 3x.</para>
-        <para>There's just one problem: tour screen doesn't work that way. Time for a short history
+        <para>There's just one problem: your screen doesn't work that way. Time for a short history
             of television/monitors.</para>
         <para>The original televisions used an electron gun fired at a phosphor surface to generate
             light and images; this is called a <acronym>CRT</acronym> display (cathode ray tube).
                     <mathphrase>1/r<superscript>2.2</superscript></mathphrase>
                 </inlineequation>.</para>
             <para>Since this lighting environment was not designed while looking at gamma correct
-                results, let's look at some scene lighting that was developed that way. Turn on
-                gamma correction and set the gamma value to 2.2 (the default if you did not change
-                it). The press <keycombo>
+                results, let's look at some scene lighting that was developed with proper gamma in
+                mind. Turn on gamma correction and set the gamma value to 2.2 (the default if you
+                did not change it). The press <keycombo>
                     <keycap>Shift</keycap>
                     <keycap>L</keycap>
                 </keycombo>:</para>

Documents/Illumination/Tutorial 13.xml

                     </imageobject>
                 </mediaobject>
             </figure>
-            <para>The top is the original, the middle is the actual mesh, and the bottom is our new
-                ray traced version.</para>
-            <para>The <function>Impostor</function> function in the fragment shader implements our
-                ray tracing algorithm. More importantly are the changes to the vertex shader's
-                computation of the impostor square:</para>
+            <para>The top is the original impostor, the middle is the actual mesh, and the bottom is
+                our new ray traced impostor.</para>
+            <para>The <function>Impostor</function> function in the new fragment shader implements
+                our ray tracing algorithm. More important than this are the changes to the vertex
+                shader's computation of the impostor square:</para>
             <example>
                 <title>Ray Traced Impostor Square</title>
                 <programlisting language="glsl">const float g_boxCorrection = 1.5;
                 vertex shader is used to index into the <varname>Mtl.material[]</varname>
                 array.</para>
             <para>Do note that uniform blocks have a maximum size that is hardware-dependent. If we
-                wanted to have a large palette of materials, on the order of several
-                thousand,</para>
+                wanted to have a large palette of materials, on the order of several thousand, then
+                we may exceed this limit. At that point, we would need an entirely new way to handle
+                this data. Once that we haven't learned about yet.</para>
+            <para>Or we could just split it up into multiple draw calls instead of one.</para>
         </section>
     </section>
     
                 or quadratic surfaces. But impostors are capable of much, much more.</para>
             <para>In effect, impostors allow you to use the fragment shader to just draw stuff to an
                 area of the screen. They can be used to rasterize perfect circles, rather than
-                drawing line-based approximations. Some have even used them to rasterize bezier
+                drawing line-based approximations. Some have even used them to rasterize zier
                 curves perfectly.</para>
             <para>There are other impostor-based solutions. Most particle systems (a large and
                 vibrant topic that you should investigate) use flat-cards to draw pictures that move
                     <funcdef>void <function>EmitVertex</function></funcdef>
                 </funcprototype>
             </funcsynopsis>
-            <para>When this function is called, all output variables previously set by the geometry
-                shader are consumed and transformed into a vertex. The value of those variables
-                becomes undefined after calling this function.</para>
+            <para>Available on in the geometry shader, when this function is called, all output
+                variables previously set by the geometry shader are consumed and transformed into a
+                vertex. The value of those variables becomes undefined after calling this
+                function.</para>
         </section>
         
     </section>