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typos, layout and other small things

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Doc/boilerplate.tex

 	E-mail: {\tt guido@cwi.nl}
 }
 
-\date{28 March 1995 \\ Release 1.2-proof-3} % XXX update before release!
+\date{10 April 1995 \\ Release 1.2} % XXX update before release!

Doc/info/texipre.dat

 Reference Manual} gives a more formal definition of the language.
 (These manuals are not yet available in INFO or Texinfo format.)
 
-This version corresponds to Python version 1.2.
+This version corresponds to Python version 1.2 (4 April 1995).
 
 @end ifinfo
 

Doc/lib/libdbm.tex

 \begin{funcdesc}{open}{filename\, rwmode\, filemode}
 Open a dbm database and return a mapping object.  \var{filename} is
 the name of the database file (without the \file{.dir} or \file{.pag}
-extensions), \var{rwmode} is \code{'r'}, \code{'w'} or \code{'rw'} as for
-\code{open}, and \var{filemode} is the \UNIX{} mode of the file, used only
-when the database has to be created.
+extensions), \var{rwmode} is \code{'r'}, \code{'w'} or \code{'rw'} to
+open the database fore reading, writing or both respectively,
+and \var{filemode} is the \UNIX{} mode of the file, used only
+when the database has to be created (but to be supplied at all times).
 \end{funcdesc}

Doc/lib/libftplib.tex

 \begin{verbatim}
 >>> from ftplib import FTP
 >>> ftp = FTP('ftp.cwi.nl')   # connect to host, default port
->>> ftp.login()               # default user anonymous, passwd user@hostname
+>>> ftp.login()               # user anonymous, passwd user@hostname
 >>> ftp.retrlines('LIST')     # list directory contents
 total 24418
 drwxrwsr-x   5 ftp-usr  pdmaint     1536 Mar 20 09:48 .

Doc/lib/libgdbm.tex

 \end{excdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{open}{filename\, rwmode\, filemode}
-Open a gdbm database and return a mapping object. \var{filename} is
+Open a gdbm database and return a mapping object.  \var{filename} is
 the name of the database file, \var{rwmode} is \code{'r'}, \code{'w'},
 \code{'c'}, or \code{'n'} for reader, writer (this also gives read
 access), create (writer, but create the database if it doesn't already
-exist) and newdb (which will always create a new database). Only one
-writer may open a gdbm file and many readers may open the file. Readers
-and writers cannot open the gdbm file at the same time. Note that the
-\code{GDBM_FAST} mode of opening the database is not supported. \var{filemode} 
-is the \UNIX\ mode of the file, used only when a database is created.
+exist) and newdb (which will always create a new database).  Only one
+writer may open a gdbm file and many readers may open the file.  Readers
+and writers cannot open the gdbm file at the same time.  Note that the
+\code{GDBM_FAST} mode of opening the database is not supported.
+\var{filemode} is the \UNIX\ mode of the file, used only when a
+database is created (but to be supplied at all times).
 \end{funcdesc}

Doc/lib/libimp.tex

         return sys.modules[name]
 
     # If any of the following calls raises an exception,
-    # there's a problem we con't handle -- let the caller handle it.
+    # there's a problem we can't handle -- let the caller handle it.
 
     # See if it's a built-in module.
     m = imp.init_builtin(name)

Doc/lib/libjpeg.tex

 Treat data as a pixmap of width \var{w} and height \var{h}, with \var{b} bytes per
 pixel.  The data is in SGI GL order, so the first pixel is in the
 lower-left corner. This means that \code{lrectread} return data can
-immedeately be passed to compress.  Currently only 1 byte and 4 byte
+immediately be passed to compress.  Currently only 1 byte and 4 byte
 pixels are allowed, the former being treated as greyscale and the
 latter as RGB color.  Compress returns a string that contains the
 compressed picture, in JFIF format.

Doc/lib/libnntplib.tex

 statistics about a newsgroup and print the subjects of the last 10
 articles:
 
+\small{
 \begin{verbatim}
 >>> s = NNTP('news.cwi.nl')
 >>> resp, count, first, last, name = s.group('comp.lang.python')
 '205 news.cwi.nl closing connection.  Goodbye.'
 >>> 
 \end{verbatim}
+}
 
 To post an article from a file (this assumes that the article has
 valid headers):

Doc/lib/libpickle.tex

 
 \begin{verbatim}
 u = pickle.Unpickler(f)
-x = u.load(x)
+x = u.load()
 \end{verbatim}
 
 A shorthand is:

Doc/lib/libposix.tex

 \stmodindex{os}
 
 The descriptions below are very terse; refer to the
-corresponding \UNIX{} manual entry for more information.
+corresponding \UNIX{} manual entry for more information.  Arguments
+called \var{path} refer to a pathname given as a string.
 
 Errors are reported as exceptions; the usual exceptions are given
 for type errors, while errors reported by the system calls raise
 a tuple containing its pid and exit status indication (encoded as by
 \UNIX{}).  The semantics of the call are affected by the value of
 the integer options, which should be 0 for normal operation.  (If the
-system does not support waitpid(), this always raises
+system does not support \code{waitpid()}, this always raises
 \code{posix.error}.  Not on MS-DOS.)
 \end{funcdesc}
 

Doc/lib/libposixfile.tex

  manual page on your system.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
-\begin{funcdesc}{flags}{fmt}
+\begin{funcdesc}{flags}{\optional{flags}}
  Set the specified flags for the file that the file object is referring
  to.  The new flags are ORed with the old flags, unless specified
  otherwise.  The format is explained below in a table.  Without
- arguments a string indicating the current flags is returned (this is
+ the \var{flags} argument
+ a string indicating the current flags is returned (this is
  the same as the '?' modifier).  For more information about the flags
  refer to the fcntl manual page on your system.
 \end{funcdesc}

Doc/lib/libprofile.tex

 standard name string (file/line/function-name) that is presented in
 each line.  The following is a typical output from such a call:
 
+\small{
 \begin{verbatim}
-         main()
-         2706 function calls (2004 primitive calls) in 4.504 CPU seconds
+      main()
+      2706 function calls (2004 primitive calls) in 4.504 CPU seconds
 
-   Ordered by: standard name
+Ordered by: standard name
 
-   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
-        2    0.006    0.003    0.953    0.477 pobject.py:75(save_objects)
-     43/3    0.533    0.012    0.749    0.250 pobject.py:99(evaluate)
-    ...
+ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
+     2    0.006    0.003    0.953    0.477 pobject.py:75(save_objects)
+  43/3    0.533    0.012    0.749    0.250 pobject.py:99(evaluate)
+ ...
 \end{verbatim}
+}
 
 The first line indicates that this profile was generated by the call:\\
 \code{profile.run('main()')}, and hence the exec'ed string is
 the actual number of calls.  Note that when the function does not
 recurse, these two values are the same, and only the single figure is
 printed.
+
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{pstats.Stats}{filename\optional{\, ...}}
 be strung together.  For example:
 
 \begin{verbatim}
-pstats.Stats('foofile').strip_dirs().sort_stats('cum').print_stats().ignore()
+pstats.Stats('foofile').strip_dirs().sort_stats('cum') \
+                       .print_stats().ignore()
 \end{verbatim}
 
 would perform all the indicated functions, but it would not return

Doc/lib/libstring.tex

 \samp{0} means 8, anything else means 10.  If \var{base} is 16, a
 leading \samp{0x} or \samp{0X} is always accepted.  (Note: for a more
 flexible interpretation of numeric literals, use the built-in function
-\code{eval()}.
+\code{eval()}.)
 \bifuncindex{eval}
 \end{funcdesc}
 

Doc/lib/libsun.tex

 
 \begin{funcdesc}{write}{samples}
 Write is passed a python string containing audio samples to be played.
-If there is enough buffer space free it will immedeately return,
+If there is enough buffer space free it will immediately return,
 otherwise it will block.
 \end{funcdesc}
 

Doc/lib/libthread.tex

 Lock objects have the following methods:
 
 \renewcommand{\indexsubitem}{(lock method)}
-\begin{funcdesc}{acquire}{waitflag}
+\begin{funcdesc}{acquire}{\optional{waitflag}}
 Without the optional argument, this method acquires the lock
 unconditionally, if necessary waiting until it is released by another
 thread (only one thread at a time can acquire a lock --- that's their

Doc/lib/libtypes.tex

 priority as the corresponding numeric operations.\footnote{They must
 have since the parser can't tell the type of the operands.}
 
-This table lists the sequece operations sorted in ascending priority
+This table lists the sequence operations sorted in ascending priority
 (operations in the same box have the same priority).  In the table,
 \var{s} and \var{t} are sequences of the same type; \var{n}, \var{i}
 and \var{j} are integers:

Doc/lib/liburlparse.tex

 retained if present.
 
 Example:
-\code{urlparse('http://www.cwi.nl:80/\%7eguido/Python.html')}
+
+\begin{verbatim}
+urlparse('http://www.cwi.nl:80/%7Eguido/Python.html')
+\end{verbatim}
+
 yields the tuple
-\code{('http', 'www.cwi.nl:80', '/\%7eguido/Python.html', '', '', '')}.
+
+\begin{verbatim}
+('http', 'www.cwi.nl:80', '/%7Eguido/Python.html', '', '', '')
+\end{verbatim}
 
 If the \var{default_scheme} argument is specified, it gives the
 default addressing scheme, to be used only if the URL string does not
 components in the relative URL.
 
 Example:
-\code{urljoin('http://www.cwi.nl/\%7eguido/Python.html',}
-\code{'FAQ.html')} yields the string
-\code{'http://www.cwi.nl/\%7eguido/FAQ.html'}.
+
+\begin{verbatim}
+urljoin('http://www.cwi.nl/%7Eguido/Python.html', 'FAQ.html')
+\end{verbatim}
+
+yields the string
+
+\begin{verbatim}
+'http://www.cwi.nl/%7Eguido/FAQ.html'
+\end{verbatim}
 
 The \var{allow_fragments} argument has the same meaning as for
 \code{urlparse}.
 
 This module provides a partial interface to the Macintosh
 Communications Toolbox. Currently, only Connection Manager tools are
-supported. 
+supported.  It may not be available in all Mac Python versions.
 
 \begin{datadesc}{error}
 The exception raised on errors.
 \begin{funcdesc}{open}{filename\, rwmode\, filemode}
 Open a dbm database and return a mapping object.  \var{filename} is
 the name of the database file (without the \file{.dir} or \file{.pag}
-extensions), \var{rwmode} is \code{'r'}, \code{'w'} or \code{'rw'} as for
-\code{open}, and \var{filemode} is the \UNIX{} mode of the file, used only
-when the database has to be created.
+extensions), \var{rwmode} is \code{'r'}, \code{'w'} or \code{'rw'} to
+open the database fore reading, writing or both respectively,
+and \var{filemode} is the \UNIX{} mode of the file, used only
+when the database has to be created (but to be supplied at all times).
 \end{funcdesc}

Doc/libftplib.tex

 \begin{verbatim}
 >>> from ftplib import FTP
 >>> ftp = FTP('ftp.cwi.nl')   # connect to host, default port
->>> ftp.login()               # default user anonymous, passwd user@hostname
+>>> ftp.login()               # user anonymous, passwd user@hostname
 >>> ftp.retrlines('LIST')     # list directory contents
 total 24418
 drwxrwsr-x   5 ftp-usr  pdmaint     1536 Mar 20 09:48 .
 \end{excdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{open}{filename\, rwmode\, filemode}
-Open a gdbm database and return a mapping object. \var{filename} is
+Open a gdbm database and return a mapping object.  \var{filename} is
 the name of the database file, \var{rwmode} is \code{'r'}, \code{'w'},
 \code{'c'}, or \code{'n'} for reader, writer (this also gives read
 access), create (writer, but create the database if it doesn't already
-exist) and newdb (which will always create a new database). Only one
-writer may open a gdbm file and many readers may open the file. Readers
-and writers cannot open the gdbm file at the same time. Note that the
-\code{GDBM_FAST} mode of opening the database is not supported. \var{filemode} 
-is the \UNIX\ mode of the file, used only when a database is created.
+exist) and newdb (which will always create a new database).  Only one
+writer may open a gdbm file and many readers may open the file.  Readers
+and writers cannot open the gdbm file at the same time.  Note that the
+\code{GDBM_FAST} mode of opening the database is not supported.
+\var{filemode} is the \UNIX\ mode of the file, used only when a
+database is created (but to be supplied at all times).
 \end{funcdesc}
         return sys.modules[name]
 
     # If any of the following calls raises an exception,
-    # there's a problem we con't handle -- let the caller handle it.
+    # there's a problem we can't handle -- let the caller handle it.
 
     # See if it's a built-in module.
     m = imp.init_builtin(name)
 Treat data as a pixmap of width \var{w} and height \var{h}, with \var{b} bytes per
 pixel.  The data is in SGI GL order, so the first pixel is in the
 lower-left corner. This means that \code{lrectread} return data can
-immedeately be passed to compress.  Currently only 1 byte and 4 byte
+immediately be passed to compress.  Currently only 1 byte and 4 byte
 pixels are allowed, the former being treated as greyscale and the
 latter as RGB color.  Compress returns a string that contains the
 compressed picture, in JFIF format.

Doc/libmacdnr.tex

 \bimodindex{macdnr}
 
 This module provides an interface to the Macintosh Domain Name
-Resolver. It is usually used in conjunction with the \var{mactcp} module, to
-map hostnames to IP-addresses.
+Resolver.  It is usually used in conjunction with the \var{mactcp}
+module, to map hostnames to IP-addresses.  It may not be available in
+all Mac Python versions.
 
 The \code{macdnr} module defines the following functions:
 
 \renewcommand{\indexsubitem}{(in module macdnr)}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{Open}{\optional{filename}}
-Open the domain name resolver extension. If \var{filename} is given it
+Open the domain name resolver extension.  If \var{filename} is given it
 should be the pathname of the extension, otherwise a default is
-used. Normally, this call is not needed since the other calls will
+used.  Normally, this call is not needed since the other calls will
 open the extension automatically.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{Close}{}
-Close the resolver extension. Again, not needed for normal use.
+Close the resolver extension.  Again, not needed for normal use.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{StrToAddr}{hostname}
-Look up the IP address for \var{hostname}. This call returns a dnr
+Look up the IP address for \var{hostname}.  This call returns a dnr
 result object of the ``address'' variation.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{AddrToName}{addr}
 Do a reverse lookup on the 32-bit integer IP-address
-\var{addr}. Returns a dnr result object of the ``address'' variation.
+\var{addr}.  Returns a dnr result object of the ``address'' variation.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{AddrToStr}{addr}
 Convert the 32-bit integer IP-address \var{addr} to a dotted-decimal
-string. Returns the string.
+string.  Returns the string.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{HInfo}{hostname}
 Query the nameservers for a \code{HInfo} record for host
-\var{hostname}. These records contain hardware and software
+\var{hostname}.  These records contain hardware and software
 information about the machine in question (if they are available in
-the first place). Returns a dnr result object of the ``hinfo''
+the first place).  Returns a dnr result object of the ``hinfo''
 variety.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{MXInfo}{domain}
-Query the nameservers for a mail exchanger for \var{domain}. This is
+Query the nameservers for a mail exchanger for \var{domain}.  This is
 the hostname of a host willing to accept SMTP mail for the given
-domain. Returns a dnr result object of the ``mx'' variety.
+domain.  Returns a dnr result object of the ``mx'' variety.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \subsection{dnr result object}
 
 Since the DNR calls all execute asynchronously you do not get the
-results back immedeately. In stead, you get a dnr result object. You
+results back immediately.  Instead, you get a dnr result object.  You
 can check this object to see whether the query is complete, and access
 its attributes to obtain the information when it is.
 
 \dataline{ip1}
 \dataline{ip2}
 \dataline{ip3}
-At most four integer IP addresses for this host. Unused entries are
-zero. Valid only for address queries.
+At most four integer IP addresses for this host.  Unused entries are
+zero.  Valid only for address queries.
 \end{datadesc}
 
 \begin{datadesc}{cpuType}
 \dataline{osType}
-Textual strings giving the machine type an OS name. Valid for hinfo
+Textual strings giving the machine type an OS name.  Valid for hinfo
 queries.
 \end{datadesc}
 
 \begin{datadesc}{exchange}
-The name of a mail-exchanger host. Valid for mx queries.
+The name of a mail-exchanger host.  Valid for mx queries.
 \end{datadesc}
 
 \begin{datadesc}{preference}
-The preference of this mx record. Not too useful, since the Macintosh
-will only return a single mx record. Mx queries only.
+The preference of this mx record.  Not too useful, since the Macintosh
+will only return a single mx record.  Mx queries only.
 \end{datadesc}
 
 The simplest way to use the module to convert names to dotted-decimal

Doc/libmacspeech.tex

 allowing you to let the Macintosh utter phrases. You need a version of
 the speech manager extension (version 1 and 2 have been tested) in
 your \code{Extensions} folder for this to work. The module does not
-provide full access to all features of the Speech Manager yet.
+provide full access to all features of the Speech Manager yet.  It may
+not be available in all Mac Python versions.
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{Available}{}
 Test availability of the Speech Manager extension (and, on the

Doc/libmactcp.tex

 interface to the name-server (allowing you to translate hostnames to
 ip-addresses), a module \code{MACTCP} which has symbolic names for
 constants constants used by MacTCP and a wrapper module \code{socket}
-which mimics the \UNIX{} socket interface (as far as possible).
+which mimics the \UNIX{} socket interface (as far as possible).  It may
+not be available in all Mac Python versions.
 
 A complete description of the MacTCP interface can be found in the
 Apple MacTCP API documentation.

Doc/libnntplib.tex

 statistics about a newsgroup and print the subjects of the last 10
 articles:
 
+\small{
 \begin{verbatim}
 >>> s = NNTP('news.cwi.nl')
 >>> resp, count, first, last, name = s.group('comp.lang.python')
 '205 news.cwi.nl closing connection.  Goodbye.'
 >>> 
 \end{verbatim}
+}
 
 To post an article from a file (this assumes that the article has
 valid headers):

Doc/libpickle.tex

 
 \begin{verbatim}
 u = pickle.Unpickler(f)
-x = u.load(x)
+x = u.load()
 \end{verbatim}
 
 A shorthand is:
 \stmodindex{os}
 
 The descriptions below are very terse; refer to the
-corresponding \UNIX{} manual entry for more information.
+corresponding \UNIX{} manual entry for more information.  Arguments
+called \var{path} refer to a pathname given as a string.
 
 Errors are reported as exceptions; the usual exceptions are given
 for type errors, while errors reported by the system calls raise
 a tuple containing its pid and exit status indication (encoded as by
 \UNIX{}).  The semantics of the call are affected by the value of
 the integer options, which should be 0 for normal operation.  (If the
-system does not support waitpid(), this always raises
+system does not support \code{waitpid()}, this always raises
 \code{posix.error}.  Not on MS-DOS.)
 \end{funcdesc}
 

Doc/libposixfile.tex

  manual page on your system.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
-\begin{funcdesc}{flags}{fmt}
+\begin{funcdesc}{flags}{\optional{flags}}
  Set the specified flags for the file that the file object is referring
  to.  The new flags are ORed with the old flags, unless specified
  otherwise.  The format is explained below in a table.  Without
- arguments a string indicating the current flags is returned (this is
+ the \var{flags} argument
+ a string indicating the current flags is returned (this is
  the same as the '?' modifier).  For more information about the flags
  refer to the fcntl manual page on your system.
 \end{funcdesc}

Doc/libprofile.tex

 standard name string (file/line/function-name) that is presented in
 each line.  The following is a typical output from such a call:
 
+\small{
 \begin{verbatim}
-         main()
-         2706 function calls (2004 primitive calls) in 4.504 CPU seconds
+      main()
+      2706 function calls (2004 primitive calls) in 4.504 CPU seconds
 
-   Ordered by: standard name
+Ordered by: standard name
 
-   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
-        2    0.006    0.003    0.953    0.477 pobject.py:75(save_objects)
-     43/3    0.533    0.012    0.749    0.250 pobject.py:99(evaluate)
-    ...
+ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
+     2    0.006    0.003    0.953    0.477 pobject.py:75(save_objects)
+  43/3    0.533    0.012    0.749    0.250 pobject.py:99(evaluate)
+ ...
 \end{verbatim}
+}
 
 The first line indicates that this profile was generated by the call:\\
 \code{profile.run('main()')}, and hence the exec'ed string is
 the actual number of calls.  Note that when the function does not
 recurse, these two values are the same, and only the single figure is
 printed.
+
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{pstats.Stats}{filename\optional{\, ...}}
 be strung together.  For example:
 
 \begin{verbatim}
-pstats.Stats('foofile').strip_dirs().sort_stats('cum').print_stats().ignore()
+pstats.Stats('foofile').strip_dirs().sort_stats('cum') \
+                       .print_stats().ignore()
 \end{verbatim}
 
 would perform all the indicated functions, but it would not return

Doc/libstring.tex

 \samp{0} means 8, anything else means 10.  If \var{base} is 16, a
 leading \samp{0x} or \samp{0X} is always accepted.  (Note: for a more
 flexible interpretation of numeric literals, use the built-in function
-\code{eval()}.
+\code{eval()}.)
 \bifuncindex{eval}
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{write}{samples}
 Write is passed a python string containing audio samples to be played.
-If there is enough buffer space free it will immedeately return,
+If there is enough buffer space free it will immediately return,
 otherwise it will block.
 \end{funcdesc}
 

Doc/libthread.tex

 Lock objects have the following methods:
 
 \renewcommand{\indexsubitem}{(lock method)}
-\begin{funcdesc}{acquire}{waitflag}
+\begin{funcdesc}{acquire}{\optional{waitflag}}
 Without the optional argument, this method acquires the lock
 unconditionally, if necessary waiting until it is released by another
 thread (only one thread at a time can acquire a lock --- that's their
 priority as the corresponding numeric operations.\footnote{They must
 have since the parser can't tell the type of the operands.}
 
-This table lists the sequece operations sorted in ascending priority
+This table lists the sequence operations sorted in ascending priority
 (operations in the same box have the same priority).  In the table,
 \var{s} and \var{t} are sequences of the same type; \var{n}, \var{i}
 and \var{j} are integers:

Doc/liburlparse.tex

 retained if present.
 
 Example:
-\code{urlparse('http://www.cwi.nl:80/\%7eguido/Python.html')}
+
+\begin{verbatim}
+urlparse('http://www.cwi.nl:80/%7Eguido/Python.html')
+\end{verbatim}
+
 yields the tuple
-\code{('http', 'www.cwi.nl:80', '/\%7eguido/Python.html', '', '', '')}.
+
+\begin{verbatim}
+('http', 'www.cwi.nl:80', '/%7Eguido/Python.html', '', '', '')
+\end{verbatim}
 
 If the \var{default_scheme} argument is specified, it gives the
 default addressing scheme, to be used only if the URL string does not
 components in the relative URL.
 
 Example:
-\code{urljoin('http://www.cwi.nl/\%7eguido/Python.html',}
-\code{'FAQ.html')} yields the string
-\code{'http://www.cwi.nl/\%7eguido/FAQ.html'}.
+
+\begin{verbatim}
+urljoin('http://www.cwi.nl/%7Eguido/Python.html', 'FAQ.html')
+\end{verbatim}
+
+yields the string
+
+\begin{verbatim}
+'http://www.cwi.nl/%7Eguido/FAQ.html'
+\end{verbatim}
 
 The \var{allow_fragments} argument has the same meaning as for
 \code{urlparse}.

Doc/mac/libctb.tex

 
 This module provides a partial interface to the Macintosh
 Communications Toolbox. Currently, only Connection Manager tools are
-supported. 
+supported.  It may not be available in all Mac Python versions.
 
 \begin{datadesc}{error}
 The exception raised on errors.

Doc/mac/libmacdnr.tex

 \bimodindex{macdnr}
 
 This module provides an interface to the Macintosh Domain Name
-Resolver. It is usually used in conjunction with the \var{mactcp} module, to
-map hostnames to IP-addresses.
+Resolver.  It is usually used in conjunction with the \var{mactcp}
+module, to map hostnames to IP-addresses.  It may not be available in
+all Mac Python versions.
 
 The \code{macdnr} module defines the following functions:
 
 \renewcommand{\indexsubitem}{(in module macdnr)}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{Open}{\optional{filename}}
-Open the domain name resolver extension. If \var{filename} is given it
+Open the domain name resolver extension.  If \var{filename} is given it
 should be the pathname of the extension, otherwise a default is
-used. Normally, this call is not needed since the other calls will
+used.  Normally, this call is not needed since the other calls will
 open the extension automatically.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{Close}{}
-Close the resolver extension. Again, not needed for normal use.
+Close the resolver extension.  Again, not needed for normal use.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{StrToAddr}{hostname}
-Look up the IP address for \var{hostname}. This call returns a dnr
+Look up the IP address for \var{hostname}.  This call returns a dnr
 result object of the ``address'' variation.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{AddrToName}{addr}
 Do a reverse lookup on the 32-bit integer IP-address
-\var{addr}. Returns a dnr result object of the ``address'' variation.
+\var{addr}.  Returns a dnr result object of the ``address'' variation.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{AddrToStr}{addr}
 Convert the 32-bit integer IP-address \var{addr} to a dotted-decimal
-string. Returns the string.
+string.  Returns the string.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{HInfo}{hostname}
 Query the nameservers for a \code{HInfo} record for host
-\var{hostname}. These records contain hardware and software
+\var{hostname}.  These records contain hardware and software
 information about the machine in question (if they are available in
-the first place). Returns a dnr result object of the ``hinfo''
+the first place).  Returns a dnr result object of the ``hinfo''
 variety.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{MXInfo}{domain}
-Query the nameservers for a mail exchanger for \var{domain}. This is
+Query the nameservers for a mail exchanger for \var{domain}.  This is
 the hostname of a host willing to accept SMTP mail for the given
-domain. Returns a dnr result object of the ``mx'' variety.
+domain.  Returns a dnr result object of the ``mx'' variety.
 \end{funcdesc}
 
 \subsection{dnr result object}
 
 Since the DNR calls all execute asynchronously you do not get the
-results back immedeately. In stead, you get a dnr result object. You
+results back immediately.  Instead, you get a dnr result object.  You
 can check this object to see whether the query is complete, and access
 its attributes to obtain the information when it is.
 
 \dataline{ip1}
 \dataline{ip2}
 \dataline{ip3}
-At most four integer IP addresses for this host. Unused entries are
-zero. Valid only for address queries.
+At most four integer IP addresses for this host.  Unused entries are
+zero.  Valid only for address queries.
 \end{datadesc}
 
 \begin{datadesc}{cpuType}
 \dataline{osType}
-Textual strings giving the machine type an OS name. Valid for hinfo
+Textual strings giving the machine type an OS name.  Valid for hinfo
 queries.
 \end{datadesc}
 
 \begin{datadesc}{exchange}
-The name of a mail-exchanger host. Valid for mx queries.
+The name of a mail-exchanger host.  Valid for mx queries.
 \end{datadesc}
 
 \begin{datadesc}{preference}
-The preference of this mx record. Not too useful, since the Macintosh
-will only return a single mx record. Mx queries only.
+The preference of this mx record.  Not too useful, since the Macintosh
+will only return a single mx record.  Mx queries only.
 \end{datadesc}
 
 The simplest way to use the module to convert names to dotted-decimal

Doc/mac/libmacspeech.tex

 allowing you to let the Macintosh utter phrases. You need a version of
 the speech manager extension (version 1 and 2 have been tested) in
 your \code{Extensions} folder for this to work. The module does not
-provide full access to all features of the Speech Manager yet.
+provide full access to all features of the Speech Manager yet.  It may
+not be available in all Mac Python versions.
 
 \begin{funcdesc}{Available}{}
 Test availability of the Speech Manager extension (and, on the

Doc/mac/libmactcp.tex

 interface to the name-server (allowing you to translate hostnames to
 ip-addresses), a module \code{MACTCP} which has symbolic names for
 constants constants used by MacTCP and a wrapper module \code{socket}
-which mimics the \UNIX{} socket interface (as far as possible).
+which mimics the \UNIX{} socket interface (as far as possible).  It may
+not be available in all Mac Python versions.
 
 A complete description of the MacTCP interface can be found in the
 Apple MacTCP API documentation.

Doc/texinputs/boilerplate.tex

 	E-mail: {\tt guido@cwi.nl}
 }
 
-\date{28 March 1995 \\ Release 1.2-proof-3} % XXX update before release!
+\date{10 April 1995 \\ Release 1.2} % XXX update before release!
 Reference Manual} gives a more formal definition of the language.
 (These manuals are not yet available in INFO or Texinfo format.)
 
-This version corresponds to Python version 1.2.
+This version corresponds to Python version 1.2 (4 April 1995).
 
 @end ifinfo
 
 containing built-in names.
 
 Usually, the local scope references the local names of the (textually)
-current function.  Outside of functions, the the local scope references
+current function.  Outside of functions, the local scope references
 the same name space as the global scope: the module's name space.
 Class definitions place yet another name space in the local scope.
 
 global scope of a function defined in a module is that module's name
 space, no matter from where or by what alias the function is called.
 On the other hand, the actual search for names is done dynamically, at
-run time --- however, the the language definition is evolving towards
+run time --- however, the language definition is evolving towards
 static name resolution, at ``compile'' time, so don't rely on dynamic
 name resolution!  (In fact, local variables are already determined
 statically.)
 containing built-in names.
 
 Usually, the local scope references the local names of the (textually)
-current function.  Outside of functions, the the local scope references
+current function.  Outside of functions, the local scope references
 the same name space as the global scope: the module's name space.
 Class definitions place yet another name space in the local scope.
 
 global scope of a function defined in a module is that module's name
 space, no matter from where or by what alias the function is called.
 On the other hand, the actual search for names is done dynamically, at
-run time --- however, the the language definition is evolving towards
+run time --- however, the language definition is evolving towards
 static name resolution, at ``compile'' time, so don't rely on dynamic
 name resolution!  (In fact, local variables are already determined
 statically.)