Error importing BibTeX-Snippet

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Issue #2925 resolved
Mario Holtmüller created an issue

The following snippet cannot be imported. The reason for that seems to be the abstract.

@article{Ferdowsi.2021,
 abstract = {The preparation of high-quality perovskite thin films with a low concentration of defects has recently been achieved through cation engineering using, for example, Cs halide salts. However, many Cs salts cannot be adopted readily due to their frequent insolubility in typical N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent systems. Herein, we report the application of green, rapid, and solvent-free mechanosynthetic ball-milling for the incorporation of the otherwise insoluble CsBr to realize wide band-gap perovskite solar cells (PSCs). We mechanically synthesize triple-cation (cesium (Cs)/formamidinium (FA)/methylammonium (MA)) wide band-gap perovskites, resulting in subsequent powders that were soluble in mixed DMF/DMSO (4:1, V/V) solvents. Otherwise, the preparation of triple cations for wide band-gap perovskites through conventional solution processing could not be realized. The use of mechanosynthesis perovskites for thin-film formation allows for the growth of relatively large crystalline grains with grains diameter in the range of 500700 nm. The champion device achieved a maximum PCE of 7.3{\%} (7.03{\%} stabilized), with JSC of 7.08 mA cm2, VOC of 1.48 V, and a fill factor (FF) of 70{\%}. This performance and voltage are among the highest reported for wide band-gap PSC devices incorporating triple-cation Csx(FAyMA(1y))(1x)PbBr3 perovskites. These results show that the use of a mechanosynthetic strategy to add insoluble dopants to wide band-gap perovskites provides a promising strategy for the formation of high-quality films. Furthermore, mechanoperovskite showed higher phase purity, VOC, and efficiency as compared to the conventional solution-processed devices.

The preparation of high-quality perovskite thin films with a low concentration of defects has recently been achieved through cation engineering using, for example, Cs halide salts. However, many Cs salts cannot be adopted readily due to their frequent insolubility in typical N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent systems. Herein, we report the application of green, rapid, and solvent-free mechanosynthetic ball-milling for the incorporation of the otherwise insoluble CsBr to realize wide band-gap perovskite solar cells (PSCs). We mechanically synthesize triple-cation (cesium (Cs)/formamidinium (FA)/methylammonium (MA)) wide band-gap perovskites, resulting in subsequent powders that were soluble in mixed DMF/DMSO (4:1, V/V) solvents. Otherwise, the preparation of triple cations for wide band-gap perovskites through conventional solution processing could not be realized. The use of mechanosynthesis perovskites for thin-film formation allows for the growth of relatively large crystalline grains with grains diameter in the range of 500700 nm. The champion device achieved a maximum PCE of 7.3{\%} (7.03{\%} stabilized), with JSC of 7.08 mA cm2, VOC of 1.48 V, and a fill factor (FF) of 70{\%}. This performance and voltage are among the highest reported for wide band-gap PSC devices incorporating triple-cation Csx(FAyMA(1y))(1x)PbBr3 perovskites. These results show that the use of a mechanosynthetic strategy to add insoluble dopants to wide band-gap perovskites provides a promising strategy for the formation of high-quality films. Furthermore, mechanoperovskite showed higher phase purity, VOC, and efficiency as compared to the conventional solution-processed devices.},
 author = {Ferdowsi, Parnian and Ochoa-Martinez, Efrain and Steiner, Ullrich and Saliba, Michael},
 year = {2021},
 title = {One-Step Solvent-Free Mechanochemical Incorporation of Insoluble Cesium Salt into Perovskites for Wide Band-Gap Solar Cells},
 pages = {3971--3979},
 volume = {33},
 number = {11},
 issn = {0897-4756},
 journal = {Chemistry of Materials},
 doi = {10.1021/acs.chemmater.1c00276}
} 

Comments (5)

  1. Til Barthel

    I found the bug. When trying to import the snippet it is checked wether it is Bibtex, Endnote or RIS. This is done by using a regex and returning matcher.find(). The Regex for the Endnote "(?s)((%\\S)\\s+(([^%]|%\\s)*))" finds something in the above snippet and returns true. Therefore the EndnoteToBibtexConverter is used on the Bibtex. I either have to adjust the regex of EndnoteToBibtexConverter or the handleSelection Method of the PublicationImporter.

  2. Mario Holtmüller reporter

    I’m not 100% sure, but I guess every endnote line starts with %. I guess adapting the regex seems feasible. Is the order of the matchers fixed? Maybe we can alter it as well?

  3. Jan Pfister

    we checked the wiki and every single line in an endote should begin with a %. Therefore we believe the fix as is should be fine.

    Order of matchers is kind of fixed afair, because it is a “fallthrough“ like: if not (endnote or RIS) => bibtex

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