Michael Markert avatar Michael Markert committed 6911b28

Updated translation and english sources to r86730.

Comments (0)

Files changed (7)

english-sources/classes.rst

 A *namespace* is a mapping from names to objects.  Most namespaces are currently
 implemented as Python dictionaries, but that's normally not noticeable in any
 way (except for performance), and it may change in the future.  Examples of
-namespaces are: the set of built-in names (functions such as :func:`abs`, and
+namespaces are: the set of built-in names (containing functions such as :func:`abs`, and
 built-in exception names); the global names in a module; and the local names in
 a function invocation.  In a sense the set of attributes of an object also form
 a namespace.  The important thing to know about namespaces is that there is

english-sources/controlflow.rst

 If you do need to iterate over a sequence of numbers, the built-in function
 :func:`range` comes in handy.  It generates arithmetic progressions::
 
-
     >>> for i in range(5):
     ...     print(i)
     ...
     3
     4
 
-
-
-The given end point is never part of the generated list; ``range(10)`` generates
+The given end point is never part of the generated sequence; ``range(10)`` generates
 10 values, the legal indices for items of a sequence of length 10.  It
 is possible to let the range start at another number, or to specify a different
 increment (even negative; sometimes this is called the 'step')::

english-sources/datastructures.rst

 eliminating duplicate entries.  Set objects also support mathematical operations
 like union, intersection, difference, and symmetric difference.
 
-Curly braces or the :func:`set` function can be use to create sets. Note: To
+Curly braces or the :func:`set` function can be used to create sets.  Note: To
 create an empty set you have to use ``set()``, not ``{}``; the latter creates an
 empty dictionary, a data structure that we discuss in the next section.
 

english-sources/introduction.rst

-.. _tut-informal:
+.. _tut-informal:
 
 **********************************
 An Informal Introduction to Python
 are typed for input: inside quotes, and with quotes and other funny characters
 escaped by backslashes, to show the precise value.  The string is enclosed in
 double quotes if the string contains a single quote and no double quotes, else
-it's enclosed in single quotes.  Once again, the :func:`print` function
-produces the more readable output.
+it's enclosed in single quotes.  The :func:`print` function produces a more
+readable output for such input strings.
 
 String literals can span multiple lines in several ways.  Continuation lines can
 be used, with a backslash as the last character on the line indicating that the
 
 Or, strings can be surrounded in a pair of matching triple-quotes: ``"""`` or
 ``'''``.  End of lines do not need to be escaped when using triple-quotes, but
-they will be included in the string. ::
+they will be included in the string.  So the following uses one escape to
+avoid an unwanted initial blank line.  ::
 
-   print("""
+   print("""\
    Usage: thingy [OPTIONS]
         -h                        Display this usage message
         -H hostname               Hostname to connect to
 
      >>> a, b = 0, 1
      >>> while b < 1000:
-     ...     print(b, end=' ')
+     ...     print(b, end=',')
      ...     a, b = b, a+b
      ...
-     1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55 89 144 233 377 610 987
+     1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55,89,144,233,377,610,987,

source/classes.rst

 Namensräume sind momentan als Dictionaries implementiert, aber das ist
 normalerweise in keinerlei Hinsicht spürbar (außer bei der Performance) und kann
 sich in Zukunft ändern. Beispiele für Namensräume sind: Die Menge der
-eingebauten Namen (Funktionen wie :func:`abs` und eingebaute Ausnahmen), die
-globalen Namen eines Moduls und die lokalen Namen eines Funktionsaufrufs. In
+eingebauten Namen (enthält Funktionen wie :func:`abs` und eingebaute Ausnahmen),
+die globalen Namen eines Moduls und die lokalen Namen eines Funktionsaufrufs. In
 gewisser Hinsicht bilden auch die Attribute eines Objektes einen Namensraum.
 Das Wichtigste, das man über Namensräume wissen muss, ist, dass es absolut
 keinen Bezug von Namen in verschiedenen Namensräumen zueinander gibt. Zum

source/controlflow.rst

 
 Wird nur ein Argument angegeben, so beginnt der erzeugte Bereich bei Null und
 endet mit dem um 1 kleineren Wert des angegebenen Arguments. ``range(10)``
-erzeugt die Zahlen von 0 bis einschließlich 9. Das entspricht den gültigen
-Indizes einer Sequenz mit zehn Elementen. Es ist ebenfalls möglich, den Bereich
-mit einem anderen Wert als Null zu beginnen oder auch eine bestimmte
+erzeugt eine Sequenz der Zahlen von 0 bis einschließlich 9. Das entspricht den
+gültigen Indizes einer Sequenz mit zehn Elementen. Es ist ebenfalls möglich, den
+Bereich mit einem anderen Wert als Null zu beginnen oder auch eine bestimmte
 Schrittweite (*step*) festzulegen --- sogar negative Schrittweiten sind möglich.
 ::
 

source/introduction.rst

 um den exakten Wert wiederzugeben. Die Zeichenkette wird von doppelten
 Anführungszeichen eingeschlossen, wenn er ein einfaches Anführungszeichen, aber
 keine doppelten enthält, sonst wird er von einfachen Anführungszeichen
-eingeschlossen. Auch hier produziert die Funktion :func:`print` eine lesbarere
-Ausgabe.
+eingeschlossen. Die Funktion :func:`print` produziert eine lesbarere Ausgabe.
 
 Es gibt mehrere Möglichkeiten, mehrzeilige Zeichenkettenliterale zu erzeugen,
 zum Beispiel durch Fortsetzungszeilen, die mit einem Backslash am Ende der
 umgeben werden: ``"""`` oder ``'''``. Zeilenenden müssen nicht hierbei escaped
 werden, sondern werden in die Zeichenkette übernommen. ::
     
-   print("""
+   print("""\
    Usage: thingy [OPTIONS]
         -h                        Display this usage message
         -H hostname               Hostname to connect to
Tip: Filter by directory path e.g. /media app.js to search for public/media/app.js.
Tip: Use camelCasing e.g. ProjME to search for ProjectModifiedEvent.java.
Tip: Filter by extension type e.g. /repo .js to search for all .js files in the /repo directory.
Tip: Separate your search with spaces e.g. /ssh pom.xml to search for src/ssh/pom.xml.
Tip: Use ↑ and ↓ arrow keys to navigate and return to view the file.
Tip: You can also navigate files with Ctrl+j (next) and Ctrl+k (previous) and view the file with Ctrl+o.
Tip: You can also navigate files with Alt+j (next) and Alt+k (previous) and view the file with Alt+o.