Add .xsl extension for XML lexer

Issue #153 resolved
Former user created an issue

Would be nice if XSL templates would be colorized by default as well.

Possibly also .fo, .atom, .rss, etc.

Reported by Manuzhai manuzhai@gmail.org

Comments (6)

  1. Anonymous

    that will make our tools ever better and ever more useful. Keep holding us to a high standard. Mike and I are honored to be behind the scenes supporting so many companies, schools, and non-profits. You inspire us every day with the big dreams you&#8217;re [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://blogs.atlassian.com/2015/09/50000-atlassian-customers/">50,000 dreams come true</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="http://blogs.atlassian.com">Atlassian Blogs</a>.</p> ]]></description> <content:encoded><![CDATA[<div id="attachment_32436" style="width: 192px" class="wp-caption alignright"><img class="wp-image-32436" src="http://blogs.atlassian.com/wp-content/uploads/MikeScott2004-257x300.png" alt="MikeScott2004" width="182" height="212" /><p class="wp-caption-text">Mike and me in 2004, around the time we set our 50,000 customers goal.</p></div> <p>$48,500. That was the PricewaterhouseCoopers salary that I turned down in 2002 to start Atlassian with Mike Cannon-Brookes. There was no technology industry in Australia at the time, nor a start-up industry. Our university professors disowned us. Our parents looked the other way. Our original goal was to earn more than $48,500 and <em>not</em> to have to wear a suit to work.</p> <p>Before we achieved that humble goal, we set a big, hairy, audacious goal to one day have 50,000 customers. <em>Fifty-fucking-thousand!</em> A seemingly impossible idea at a time when most enterprise software companies were selling to a subset of the Fortune 500. But we believed that software would be huge. That it would disrupt every industry. The world just hadn&#8217;t realised it yet.</p> <p>We knew that in order to reach that goal whilst remaining in Australia, we&#8217;d have to sell online, at low prices, and in massive volume. So our business model was heavily influenced by geography – and it worked.</p> <p>It&#8217;s been a 10-year journey since we set that goal, and we&#8217;ve had huge ups and downs. We&#8217;ve also hit some incredible milestones along the way: selling into over 100 countries, reaching a billion dollars in all-time sales, establishing offices on 4 continents, winning Australia&#8217;s Entrepreneur of the Year, hitting 100 (then 1000, then <em>1500</em>) staff, becoming Australia&#8217;s best place to work two years in a row. We&#8217;ve donated $5.8MM to charity, and helped hundreds of thousands of children get an education. Millions of people use our products on a daily basis and are more successful because of it.</p> <p>But today we&#8217;ve reached the sweetest accomplishment of all: 50,000 active customers of Atlassian&#8217;s products. Dreams can come true.</p> <p>A huge thank you to all our customers who have invested in us,

  2. Anonymous

    <wfw:commentRss>http://blogs.atlassian.com/2015/09/using-scrum-balance-operations-and-innovation-atlassian-support/feed/</wfw:commentRss>; <slash:comments>8</slash:comments> </item> <item> <title>50,000 dreams come true</title> <link>http://blogs.atlassian.com/2015/09/50000-atlassian-customers/</link>; <comments>http://blogs.atlassian.com/2015/09/50000-atlassian-customers/#comments</comments>; <pubDate>Wed, 23 Sep 2015 14:00:27 +0000</pubDate> <dc:creator><![CDATA[Scott Farquhar]]></dc:creator> <category><![CDATA[Uncategorized]]></category>

        <guid isPermaLink="false">http://blogs.atlassian.com/?p=32435</guid>
        <description><![CDATA[<p>$48,500. That was the PricewaterhouseCoopers salary that I turned down in 2002 to start Atlassian with Mike Cannon-Brookes. There was no technology industry in Australia at the time, nor a start-up industry. Our university professors disowned us. Our parents looked the other way. Our original goal was to earn more than $48,500 and not to have to wear a suit to work. Before we achieved that humble goal, we set a big, hairy, audacious goal to one day have 50,000 customers. Fifty-fucking-thousand! A seemingly impossible idea at a time when most enterprise software companies were selling to a subset of the Fortune 500. But we believed that software would be huge. That it would disrupt every industry. The world just hadn&#8217;t realised it yet. We knew that in order to reach that goal whilst remaining in Australia, we&#8217;d have to sell online, at low prices, and in massive volume. So our business model was heavily influenced by geography – and it worked. It&#8217;s been a 10-year journey since we set that goal, and we&#8217;ve had huge ups and downs. We&#8217;ve also hit some incredible milestones along the way: selling into over 100 countries, reaching a billion dollars in all-time sales, establishing offices on 4 continents, winning Australia&#8217;s Entrepreneur of the Year, hitting 100 (then 1000, then 1500) staff, becoming Australia&#8217;s best place to work two years in a row. We&#8217;ve donated $5.8MM to charity, and helped hundreds of thousands of children get an education. Millions of people use our products on a daily basis and are more successful because of it. But today we&#8217;ve reached the sweetest accomplishment of all: 50,000 active customers of Atlassian&#8217;s products. Dreams can come true. A huge thank you to all our customers who have invested in us, helped make our products better with your feedback, and recommended us to your friends. Without you, Atlassian wouldn&#8217;t exist. To our staff, past and present, thanks for your dedication and hard work to get us this far. Our customers thank you for everything you give, and I&#8217;m thankful I get to work with you every day. So what&#8217;s the next big goal for Atlassian? We want every knowledge worker in every company to use an Atlassian product every day.
    
  3. Anonymous

    Balancingoperationsandinnovation-Idea5:tryscrum" class="p1">Idea 4: try scrum</h2> <p>So we came up with our very first scrum project: Wallboards for Support.</p> <p>We worked in two week sprints, with one day of project work per person for every two-week iteration (5 work days in an iteration). And guess what? We found a formula that worked! We continued with it for four months and, naturally, this led to four months of uninterrupted and smooth execution, on-time delivery, and new projects galore.</p> <p>Well&#8230;</p> <p><span class="s1">We had challenges. For instance, engineers were constantly being pulled into operational work. But this time, however, we dealt with the challenge as a team and we came up with some</span> structure for handling these situations. When this happened, other team members realized they needed to pick up the slack, plus they knew <em>why</em> they had to pick up the slack. (Team work = Dream work).</p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">At last, after several iterations, we shipped Support Wallboards! And they are currently being used in every support-based office across Atlassian. </span></p> <p class="p1"><img class="aligncenter wp-image-32401 size-large" style="border: 1px solid #e9e9e9; border-top-left-radius: 3px; border-top-right-radius: 3px; border-bottom-right-radius: 3px; border-bottom-left-radius: 3px; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;" src="http://blogs.atlassian.com/wp-content/uploads/image2015-8-20-15-53-5-600x308.png" alt="atlassian support wallboards" width="600" height="308" /></p> <p><img class="aligncenter wp-image-32402 size-large" style="border: 1px solid #e9e9e9; border-top-left-radius: 3px; border-top-right-radius: 3px; border-bottom-right-radius: 3px; border-bottom-left-radius: 3px; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;" src="http://blogs.atlassian.com/wp-content/uploads/Screen-Shot-2015-08-20-at-15.54.38-600x341.png" alt="Atlassian support wallboards office" width="600" height="341" /></p> <p class="p1">Every support team across the globe was happy. But the scrum team was not completely satisfied. Why?</p> <ul> <li class="p1">We couldn&#8217;t follow the textbook scrum because of time constraints</li> <li class="p1">Having one day per two weeks to work on projects led to a lot of context-switching and affected focus</li> <li class="p1">The team couldn&#8217;t do a lot of teamwork because each member had to work on a different day of the week</li> </ul> <h2 id="DRAFT-Balancingoperationsandinnovation-Idea6:iterateandship" class="p1">Idea 5: iterate and ship</h2> <p>Nevertheless, this was the closest we had come to a working formula for innovation work. Scrum projects were our first step in the direction of <em>bigger and more structured</em> improvement projects within support.</p> <p>Flash forward, Atlassian now has an Operational Excellence manager to lead and coordinate future projects within support and other customer-facing teams. He has already implemented a new way of working on longer term projects and has added structure that has influenced resource planing for the team. Now each month, three engineers (from different support teams) are freed up to work on the most important project. As for methodology, we use a blend of scrum and lean methods.</p> <p>Using innovation to take your service to the next level is easier than you think, but you must be willing to experiment and think outside the box.</p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">And remember: these projects are an investment.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1">I hope this helps you work out your own way to deliver innovation within the framework of your services. </span></p> <p class="p1"> <h3>Does your team have a story about balancing innovation with day-to-day operations? We&#8217;d love to hear from you! Please share it in the comments below.</h3></p> <img src="http://blogs.atlassian.com/?feed-stats-post-id=32400" width="1" height="1" style="display: none;" /><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="http://blogs.atlassian.com/2015/09/using-scrum-balance-operations-and-innovation-atlassian-support

  4. Anonymous

    no different. We support the full stack of Atlassian products from seven locations on different continents for more than 50k customers that have more than 10 million daily users who open more than 400 requests every day. Phew!</p> <p>Still, one of Atlassian&#8217;s core values is &#8220;Be the change you seek.&#8221; In this case, it means that we can&#8217;t put off innovation despite how busy we are. We simply can&#8217;t let the obstacles to needed change stand in our way forever. In other words, we can&#8217;t be too busy to innovate.</p> <p>So the question becomes, how does innovation–change that benefits the whole team–actually <em>happen</em>? There&#8217;s always the next critical thing to do at any given point in time. It can feel like fighting a fire that&#8217;s bearing down on your house&#8230; while remodeling the kitchen!</p> <h2 id="DRAFT-Balancingoperationsandinnovation-Idea1:establishinvestmenthour">Idea 1: establish an &#8220;investment hour&#8221;</h2> <p>First, we came up with an idea called the &#8220;<strong>investment hour.&#8221;</strong> The investment hour was a small chunk of time (usually an hour per day) allocated to each person for a project of their choice. This idea had some initial success, but we quickly discovered the arrangement relied too heavily on personal habits and traits like time management skills and drive. There was too little accountability because it didn&#8217;t have an actual <em>process</em>, and it was too difficult to plan and coordinate.</p> <p>Back to the drawing board we went.</p> <h2 id="DRAFT-Balancingoperationsandinnovation-Idea2:formprojectsteam">Idea 2: form a projects team</h2> <p>Our next idea took us in a radically different direction. We formed a <strong>&#8220;projects team&#8221;</strong>: new developers hired externally with dedicated time to work on bigger projects. This approach looked good for big, long-term projects, but there was too little time for small improvements directly on the shop floor. This new projects team was just too far removed from operations and didn’t directly benefit from the support engineers&#8217; knowledge and experience.</p> <p>Next!&#8230;</p> <p>With these (failed) experiments under our belt, we did have <em>some</em>thing: experience. Could we use what we&#8217;d learned to help find a magic formula to release the innovative potential of our engineers? We knew we wanted to go big on the projects within support, but <em>how</em>?</p> <h2 id="DRAFT-Balancingoperationsandinnovation-Idea4:findamodel" class="p1">Idea 3: find a role model</h2> <p>Here&#8217;s what we wanted to do:</p> <ul> <li class="p1">Work within the team</li> <li class="p1">Stay focussed and not get distracted by day-to-day operations</li> <li class="p1">Deliver fast</li> <li class="p1">Be responsive to changing requirements</li> <li class="p1">Have flexible planning</li> </ul> <p class="p1">For inspiration, we went to our software development team and asked questions. And that&#8217;s how we realized that <strong>scrum</strong> was the way to go! At the core of scrum are roles:</p> <ul> <li class="p1">Product owner – who keeps the team focussed on building the right thing</li> <li class="p1">Development team + scrum master – whose aim is to build the thing right</li> <li class="p1">Stakeholders/customers/sponsors – who give feedback and ultimately&#8230; use the

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