1. Georg Brandl
  2. sphinx

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georg.brandl  committed 6aaca65

No parens anymore in :func: and :meth:.

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File Doc-26/howto/curses.rst

View file
 Windows remember where the cursor was left after the last operation, so if you
 leave out the *y,x* coordinates, the string or character will be displayed
 wherever the last operation left off.  You can also move the cursor with the
-:func:`move(y,x)` method.  Because some terminals always display a flashing
-cursor, you may want to ensure that the cursor is positioned in some location
-where it won't be distracting; it can be confusing to have the cursor blinking
-at some apparently random location.
+``move(y,x)`` method.  Because some terminals always display a flashing cursor,
+you may want to ensure that the cursor is positioned in some location where it
+won't be distracting; it can be confusing to have the cursor blinking at some
+apparently random location.
 
 If your application doesn't need a blinking cursor at all, you can call
-:func:`curs_set(0)` to make it invisible.  Equivalently, and for compatibility
-with older curses versions, there's a :func:`leaveok(bool)` function.  When
-*bool* is true, the curses library will attempt to suppress the flashing cursor,
-and you won't need to worry about leaving it in odd locations.
+``curs_set(0)`` to make it invisible.  Equivalently, and for compatibility with
+older curses versions, there's a ``leaveok(bool)`` function.  When *bool* is
+true, the curses library will attempt to suppress the flashing cursor, and you
+won't need to worry about leaving it in odd locations.
 
 
 Attributes and Color
 7:white.  The curses module defines named constants for each of these colors:
 :const:`curses.COLOR_BLACK`, :const:`curses.COLOR_RED`, and so forth.
 
-The :func:`init_pair(n, f, b)` function changes the definition of color pair
-*n*, to foreground color f and background color b.  Color pair 0 is hard-wired
-to white on black, and cannot be changed.
+The ``init_pair(n, f, b)`` function changes the definition of color pair *n*, to
+foreground color f and background color b.  Color pair 0 is hard-wired to white
+on black, and cannot be changed.
 
 Let's put all this together. To change color 1 to red text on a white
 background, you would call::
 to which the cursor should be moved before pausing.
 
 It's possible to change this behavior with the method :meth:`nodelay`. After
-:meth:`nodelay(1)`, :meth:`getch` for the window becomes non-blocking and
-returns ``curses.ERR`` (a value of -1) when no input is ready.  There's also a
+``nodelay(1)``, :meth:`getch` for the window becomes non-blocking and returns
+``curses.ERR`` (a value of -1) when no input is ready.  There's also a
 :func:`halfdelay` function, which can be used to (in effect) set a timer on each
 :meth:`getch`; if no input becomes available within the number of milliseconds
 specified as the argument to :func:`halfdelay`, curses raises an exception.

File Doc-26/library/email.message.rst

View file
 
 .. method:: Message.__str__()
 
-   Equivalent to :meth:`as_string(unixfrom=True)`.
+   Equivalent to ``as_string(unixfrom=True)``.
 
 
 .. method:: Message.is_multipart()

File Doc-26/library/logging.rst

View file
 
 Loggers have the following attributes and methods. Note that Loggers are never
 instantiated directly, but always through the module-level function
-:func:`logging.getLogger(name)`.
+``logging.getLogger(name)``.
 
 
 .. attribute:: Logger.propagate
 
    Indicates if a message of severity *lvl* would be processed by this logger.
    This method checks first the module-level level set by
-   :func:`logging.disable(lvl)` and then the logger's effective level as determined
+   ``logging.disable(lvl)`` and then the logger's effective level as determined
    by :meth:`getEffectiveLevel`.
 
 
 
    Returns an instance of :class:`LogRecord` initialized with interesting
    information. The *name* is the logger name; *lvl* is the numeric level;
-   *pathname* is the absolute pathname of the source file in which the logging call
-   was made; *lineno* is the line number in that file where the logging call is
-   found; *msg* is the user-supplied message (a format string); *args* is the tuple
-   which, together with *msg*, makes up the user message; and *exc_info* is the
-   exception tuple obtained by calling :func:`sys.exc_info()`\ (or :const:`None`,
-   if no exception information is available). The *func* is the name of the
-   function from which the logging call was made. If not specified, it defaults to
-   ``None``.
+   *pathname* is the absolute pathname of the source file in which the logging
+   call was made; *lineno* is the line number in that file where the logging
+   call is found; *msg* is the user-supplied message (a format string); *args*
+   is the tuple which, together with *msg*, makes up the user message; and
+   *exc_info* is the exception tuple obtained by calling :func:`sys.exc_info`
+   (or :const:`None`, if no exception information is available). The *func* is
+   the name of the function from which the logging call was made. If not
+   specified, it defaults to ``None``.
 
    .. versionchanged:: 2.5
       *func* was added.

File Doc-26/library/pyexpat.rst

View file
 
 .. method:: xmlparser.ParseFile(file)
 
-   Parse XML data reading from the object *file*.  *file* only needs to provide the
-   :meth:`read(nbytes)` method, returning the empty string when there's no more
+   Parse XML data reading from the object *file*.  *file* only needs to provide
+   the ``read(nbytes)`` method, returning the empty string when there's no more
    data.
 
 

File Doc-26/library/sgmllib.rst

View file
    This method is called to process a character reference of the form ``&#ref;``.
    The base implementation uses :meth:`convert_charref` to convert the reference to
    a string.  If that method returns a string, it is passed to :meth:`handle_data`,
-   otherwise :meth:`unknown_charref(ref)` is called to handle the error.
+   otherwise ``unknown_charref(ref)`` is called to handle the error.
 
    .. versionchanged:: 2.5
       Use :meth:`convert_charref` instead of hard-coding the conversion.

File Doc-26/whatsnew/2.0.rst

View file
 
 Unicode strings, just like regular strings, are an immutable sequence type.
 They can be indexed and sliced, but not modified in place. Unicode strings have
-an :meth:`encode( [encoding] )` method that returns an 8-bit string in the
-desired encoding.  Encodings are named by strings, such as ``'ascii'``,
-``'utf-8'``, ``'iso-8859-1'``, or whatever.  A codec API is defined for
-implementing and registering new encodings that are then available throughout a
-Python program.  If an encoding isn't specified, the default encoding is usually
-7-bit ASCII, though it can be changed for your Python installation by calling
-the :func:`sys.setdefaultencoding(encoding)` function in a customised version of
+an ``encode( [encoding] )`` method that returns an 8-bit string in the desired
+encoding.  Encodings are named by strings, such as ``'ascii'``, ``'utf-8'``,
+``'iso-8859-1'``, or whatever.  A codec API is defined for implementing and
+registering new encodings that are then available throughout a Python program.
+If an encoding isn't specified, the default encoding is usually 7-bit ASCII,
+though it can be changed for your Python installation by calling the
+:func:`sys.setdefaultencoding(encoding)` function in a customised version of
 :file:`site.py`.
 
 Combining 8-bit and Unicode strings always coerces to Unicode, using the default

File Doc-26/whatsnew/2.6.rst

View file
 
 * The :mod:`gopherlib` module has been removed.
 
-* New function in the :mod:`heapq` module: :func:`merge(iter1, iter2, ...)`
+* New function in the :mod:`heapq` module: ``merge(iter1, iter2, ...)``
   takes any number of iterables that return data  *in sorted order*,  and  returns
   a new iterator that returns the contents of all the iterators, also in sorted
   order.  For example::
 
   (Contributed by Raymond Hettinger.)
 
-* New function in the :mod:`itertools` module: :func:`izip_longest(iter1, iter2,
-  ...[, fillvalue])` makes tuples from each of the elements; if some of the
+* New function in the :mod:`itertools` module: ``izip_longest(iter1, iter2,
+  ...[, fillvalue])`` makes tuples from each of the elements; if some of the
   iterables are shorter than others, the missing values  are set to *fillvalue*.
   For example::
 

File Doc-3k/howto/curses.rst

View file
 Windows remember where the cursor was left after the last operation, so if you
 leave out the *y,x* coordinates, the string or character will be displayed
 wherever the last operation left off.  You can also move the cursor with the
-:func:`move(y,x)` method.  Because some terminals always display a flashing
-cursor, you may want to ensure that the cursor is positioned in some location
-where it won't be distracting; it can be confusing to have the cursor blinking
-at some apparently random location.
+``move(y,x)`` method.  Because some terminals always display a flashing cursor,
+you may want to ensure that the cursor is positioned in some location where it
+won't be distracting; it can be confusing to have the cursor blinking at some
+apparently random location.
 
 If your application doesn't need a blinking cursor at all, you can call
-:func:`curs_set(0)` to make it invisible.  Equivalently, and for compatibility
-with older curses versions, there's a :func:`leaveok(bool)` function.  When
-*bool* is true, the curses library will attempt to suppress the flashing cursor,
-and you won't need to worry about leaving it in odd locations.
+``curs_set(0)`` to make it invisible.  Equivalently, and for compatibility with
+older curses versions, there's a ``leaveok(bool)`` function.  When *bool* is
+true, the curses library will attempt to suppress the flashing cursor, and you
+won't need to worry about leaving it in odd locations.
 
 
 Attributes and Color
 7:white.  The curses module defines named constants for each of these colors:
 :const:`curses.COLOR_BLACK`, :const:`curses.COLOR_RED`, and so forth.
 
-The :func:`init_pair(n, f, b)` function changes the definition of color pair
-*n*, to foreground color f and background color b.  Color pair 0 is hard-wired
-to white on black, and cannot be changed.
+The ``init_pair(n, f, b)`` function changes the definition of color pair *n*, to
+foreground color f and background color b.  Color pair 0 is hard-wired to white
+on black, and cannot be changed.
 
 Let's put all this together. To change color 1 to red text on a white
 background, you would call::
 to which the cursor should be moved before pausing.
 
 It's possible to change this behavior with the method :meth:`nodelay`. After
-:meth:`nodelay(1)`, :meth:`getch` for the window becomes non-blocking and
-returns ``curses.ERR`` (a value of -1) when no input is ready.  There's also a
+``nodelay(1)``, :meth:`getch` for the window becomes non-blocking and returns
+``curses.ERR`` (a value of -1) when no input is ready.  There's also a
 :func:`halfdelay` function, which can be used to (in effect) set a timer on each
 :meth:`getch`; if no input becomes available within the number of milliseconds
 specified as the argument to :func:`halfdelay`, curses raises an exception.

File Doc-3k/library/email.message.rst

View file
 
 .. method:: Message.__str__()
 
-   Equivalent to :meth:`as_string(unixfrom=True)`.
+   Equivalent to ``as_string(unixfrom=True)``.
 
 
 .. method:: Message.is_multipart()

File Doc-3k/library/logging.rst

View file
 
 Loggers have the following attributes and methods. Note that Loggers are never
 instantiated directly, but always through the module-level function
-:func:`logging.getLogger(name)`.
+``logging.getLogger(name)``.
 
 
 .. attribute:: Logger.propagate
 
    Indicates if a message of severity *lvl* would be processed by this logger.
    This method checks first the module-level level set by
-   :func:`logging.disable(lvl)` and then the logger's effective level as determined
+   ``logging.disable(lvl)`` and then the logger's effective level as determined
    by :meth:`getEffectiveLevel`.
 
 
 
    Returns an instance of :class:`LogRecord` initialized with interesting
    information. The *name* is the logger name; *lvl* is the numeric level;
-   *pathname* is the absolute pathname of the source file in which the logging call
-   was made; *lineno* is the line number in that file where the logging call is
-   found; *msg* is the user-supplied message (a format string); *args* is the tuple
-   which, together with *msg*, makes up the user message; and *exc_info* is the
-   exception tuple obtained by calling :func:`sys.exc_info()`\ (or :const:`None`,
-   if no exception information is available). The *func* is the name of the
-   function from which the logging call was made. If not specified, it defaults to
-   ``None``.
+   *pathname* is the absolute pathname of the source file in which the logging
+   call was made; *lineno* is the line number in that file where the logging
+   call is found; *msg* is the user-supplied message (a format string); *args*
+   is the tuple which, together with *msg*, makes up the user message; and
+   *exc_info* is the exception tuple obtained by calling :func:`sys.exc_info`
+   (or :const:`None`, if no exception information is available). The *func* is
+   the name of the function from which the logging call was made. If not
+   specified, it defaults to ``None``.
 
    .. versionchanged:: 2.5
       *func* was added.

File Doc-3k/library/pyexpat.rst

View file
 
 .. method:: xmlparser.ParseFile(file)
 
-   Parse XML data reading from the object *file*.  *file* only needs to provide the
-   :meth:`read(nbytes)` method, returning the empty string when there's no more
+   Parse XML data reading from the object *file*.  *file* only needs to provide
+   the ``read(nbytes)`` method, returning the empty string when there's no more
    data.
 
 

File Doc-3k/library/sgmllib.rst

View file
    This method is called to process a character reference of the form ``&#ref;``.
    The base implementation uses :meth:`convert_charref` to convert the reference to
    a string.  If that method returns a string, it is passed to :meth:`handle_data`,
-   otherwise :meth:`unknown_charref(ref)` is called to handle the error.
+   otherwise ``unknown_charref(ref)`` is called to handle the error.
 
    .. versionchanged:: 2.5
       Use :meth:`convert_charref` instead of hard-coding the conversion.

File Doc-3k/whatsnew/2.0.rst

View file
 
 Unicode strings, just like regular strings, are an immutable sequence type.
 They can be indexed and sliced, but not modified in place. Unicode strings have
-an :meth:`encode( [encoding] )` method that returns an 8-bit string in the
-desired encoding.  Encodings are named by strings, such as ``'ascii'``,
-``'utf-8'``, ``'iso-8859-1'``, or whatever.  A codec API is defined for
-implementing and registering new encodings that are then available throughout a
-Python program.  If an encoding isn't specified, the default encoding is usually
-7-bit ASCII, though it can be changed for your Python installation by calling
-the :func:`sys.setdefaultencoding(encoding)` function in a customised version of
+an ``encode( [encoding] )`` method that returns an 8-bit string in the desired
+encoding.  Encodings are named by strings, such as ``'ascii'``, ``'utf-8'``,
+``'iso-8859-1'``, or whatever.  A codec API is defined for implementing and
+registering new encodings that are then available throughout a Python program.
+If an encoding isn't specified, the default encoding is usually 7-bit ASCII,
+though it can be changed for your Python installation by calling the
+:func:`sys.setdefaultencoding(encoding)` function in a customised version of
 :file:`site.py`.
 
 Combining 8-bit and Unicode strings always coerces to Unicode, using the default

File Doc-3k/whatsnew/2.6.rst

View file
 
 * The :mod:`gopherlib` module has been removed.
 
-* New function in the :mod:`heapq` module: :func:`merge(iter1, iter2, ...)`
+* New function in the :mod:`heapq` module: ``merge(iter1, iter2, ...)``
   takes any number of iterables that return data  *in sorted order*,  and  returns
   a new iterator that returns the contents of all the iterators, also in sorted
   order.  For example::
 
   (Contributed by Raymond Hettinger.)
 
-* New function in the :mod:`itertools` module: :func:`izip_longest(iter1, iter2,
-  ...[, fillvalue])` makes tuples from each of the elements; if some of the
+* New function in the :mod:`itertools` module: ``izip_longest(iter1, iter2,
+  ...[, fillvalue])`` makes tuples from each of the elements; if some of the
   iterables are shorter than others, the missing values  are set to *fillvalue*.
   For example::