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Doc-3k/library/contextlib.rst

 .. versionadded:: 2.5
 
 This module provides utilities for common tasks involving the :keyword:`with`
-statement.
+statement. For more information see also :ref:`typecontextmanager` and
+:ref:`context-managers`.
 
 Functions provided:
 

Doc-3k/library/re.rst

 
 
 
-This module provides regular expression matching operations similar to those
-found in Perl.  Regular expression pattern strings may not contain null bytes,
-but can specify the null byte using the ``\number`` notation.  Both patterns and
-strings to be searched can be Unicode strings as well as 8-bit strings.  The
-:mod:`re` module is always available.
+This module provides regular expression matching operations similar to
+those found in Perl. Both patterns and strings to be searched can be
+Unicode strings as well as 8-bit strings.  The :mod:`re` module is
+always available.
 
-Regular expressions use the backslash character (``'\'``) to indicate special
-forms or to allow special characters to be used without invoking their special
-meaning.  This collides with Python's usage of the same character for the same
-purpose in string literals; for example, to match a literal backslash, one might
-have to write ``'\\\\'`` as the pattern string, because the regular expression
-must be ``\\``, and each backslash must be expressed as ``\\`` inside a regular
-Python string literal.
+Regular expressions use the backslash character (``'\'``) to indicate
+special forms or to allow special characters to be used without invoking
+their special meaning.  This collides with Python's usage of the same
+character for the same purpose in string literals; for example, to match
+a literal backslash, one might have to write ``'\\\\'`` as the pattern
+string, because the regular expression must be ``\\``, and each
+backslash must be expressed as ``\\`` inside a regular Python string
+literal.
 
 The solution is to use Python's raw string notation for regular expression
 patterns; backslashes are not handled in any special way in a string literal
 newline. Usually patterns will be expressed in Python code using this raw string
 notation.
 
-
 .. seealso::
 
    Mastering Regular Expressions
 section, we'll write RE's in ``this special style``, usually without quotes, and
 strings to be matched ``'in single quotes'``.)
 
-Some characters, like ``'|'`` or ``'('``, are special. Special characters either
-stand for classes of ordinary characters, or affect how the regular expressions
-around them are interpreted.
+Some characters, like ``'|'`` or ``'('``, are special. Special
+characters either stand for classes of ordinary characters, or affect
+how the regular expressions around them are interpreted. Regular
+expression pattern strings may not contain null bytes, but can specify
+the null byte using the ``\number`` notation, e.g., ``'\x00'``.
+
 
 The special characters are:
 
    Used to indicate a set of characters.  Characters can be listed individually, or
    a range of characters can be indicated by giving two characters and separating
    them by a ``'-'``.  Special characters are not active inside sets.  For example,
-   ``[akm$]`` will match any of the characters ``'a'``, ``'k'``, ``'m'``, or
-   ``'$'``; ``[a-z]`` will match any lowercase letter, and ``[a-zA-Z0-9]`` matches
-   any letter or digit.  Character classes such as ``\w`` or ``\S`` (defined below)
-   are also acceptable inside a range.  If you want to include a ``']'`` or a
-   ``'-'`` inside a set, precede it with a backslash, or place it as the first
-   character.  The pattern ``[]]`` will match ``']'``, for example.
+   ``[akm$]`` will match any of the characters ``'a'``, ``'k'``,
+   ``'m'``, or ``'$'``; ``[a-z]`` will match any lowercase letter, and
+   ``[a-zA-Z0-9]`` matches any letter or digit.  Character classes such
+   as ``\w`` or ``\S`` (defined below) are also acceptable inside a
+   range, although the characters they match depends on whether :const:`LOCALE`
+   or  :const:`UNICODE` mode is in force.  If you want to include a
+   ``']'`` or a ``'-'`` inside a set, precede it with a backslash, or
+   place it as the first character.  The pattern ``[]]`` will match
+   ``']'``, for example.
 
    You can match the characters not within a range by :dfn:`complementing` the set.
    This is indicated by including a ``'^'`` as the first character of the set;
    currently supported extensions.
 
 ``(?iLmsux)``
-   (One or more letters from the set ``'i'``, ``'L'``, ``'m'``, ``'s'``, ``'u'``,
-   ``'x'``.)  The group matches the empty string; the letters set the corresponding
-   flags (:const:`re.I`, :const:`re.L`, :const:`re.M`, :const:`re.S`,
-   :const:`re.U`, :const:`re.X`) for the entire regular expression.  This is useful
-   if you wish to include the flags as part of the regular expression, instead of
-   passing a *flag* argument to the :func:`compile` function.
+   (One or more letters from the set ``'i'``, ``'L'``, ``'m'``, ``'s'``,
+   ``'u'``, ``'x'``.)  The group matches the empty string; the letters
+   set the corresponding flags: :const:`re.I` (ignore case),
+   :const:`re.L` (locale dependent), :const:`re.M` (multi-line),
+   :const:`re.S` (dot matches all), :const:`re.U` (Unicode dependent),
+   and :const:`re.X` (verbose), for the entire regular expression. (The
+   flags are described in :ref:`contents-of-module-re`.) This
+   is useful if you wish to include the flags as part of the regular
+   expression, instead of passing a *flag* argument to the
+   :func:`compile` function.
 
    Note that the ``(?x)`` flag changes how the expression is parsed. It should be
    used first in the expression string, or after one or more whitespace characters.
    accessible via the symbolic group name *name*.  Group names must be valid Python
    identifiers, and each group name must be defined only once within a regular
    expression.  A symbolic group is also a numbered group, just as if the group
-   were not named.  So the group named 'id' in the example above can also be
+   were not named.  So the group named 'id' in the example below can also be
    referenced as the numbered group 1.
 
    For example, if the pattern is ``(?P<id>[a-zA-Z_]\w*)``, the group can be
 
 ``(?(id/name)yes-pattern|no-pattern)``
    Will try to match with ``yes-pattern`` if the group with given *id* or *name*
-   exists, and with ``no-pattern`` if it doesn't. ``|no-pattern`` is optional and
+   exists, and with ``no-pattern`` if it doesn't. ``no-pattern`` is optional and
    can be omitted. For example,  ``(<)?(\w+@\w+(?:\.\w+)+)(?(1)>)`` is a poor email
    matching pattern, which will match with ``'<user@host.com>'`` as well as
    ``'user@host.com'``, but not with ``'<user@host.com'``.
 
 ``\B``
    Matches the empty string, but only when it is *not* at the beginning or end of a
-   word.  This is just the opposite of ``\ b``, so is also subject to the settings
+   word.  This is just the opposite of ``\b``, so is also subject to the settings
    of ``LOCALE`` and ``UNICODE``.
 
 ``\d``

Doc-3k/library/stdtypes.rst

 Python defines several context managers to support easy thread synchronisation,
 prompt closure of files or other objects, and simpler manipulation of the active
 decimal arithmetic context. The specific types are not treated specially beyond
-their implementation of the context management protocol.
+their implementation of the context management protocol. See the
+:mod:`contextlib` module for some examples.
 
 Python's generators and the ``contextlib.contextfactory`` decorator provide a
 convenient way to implement these protocols.  If a generator function is
 objects because they don't contain a reference to their global execution
 environment.  Code objects are returned by the built-in :func:`compile` function
 and can be extracted from function objects through their :attr:`__code__`
-attribute.
+attribute. See also the :mod:`code` module.
 
 .. index::
    builtin: exec

Doc-3k/library/struct.rst

 
    Pack the values ``v1, v2, ...`` according to the given format, write the packed
    bytes into the writable *buffer* starting at *offset*. Note that the offset is
-   not an optional argument.
+   a required argument.
 
    .. versionadded:: 2.5