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Learning Log

Following this post:

http://www.freestylemind.com/how-to-keep-track-of-what-youve-learnt/

about keeping a learning log, here is a command-line tool that allows you to edit and review your learning log.

Usage

Adding

Adding something you've learnt:

$ llog add

The program asks you a caption for this item you've learnt. You may enter anything, like: "How to cook eggs with tomato", or "How to query a MySQL database", for example.

Options

  • --date: assign the added item to the specified date. The format must be YYYY-MM-DD. If not specified, the item will be assigned to the current date / time.

Review

Every day or so, you can review your past log. The present program makes several jumps in your log:

  • yesterday,
  • last week (more precisely D-7),
  • last month (more precisely D-30),
  • last six months (more precisely D-180),
  • last year (more precisely Y-1),

To make a complete review, just type:

$ llog review

Options

  • --date: review a specific date by using this option. The format must be YYYY-MM-DD.

Note

Why do we do D-30, instead of M-1, for example... Simply because the calendar months don't have the same length. If we did apply the "M-1" rule, you'd never have a "May 31st" review. Because on 'June 30th', you'd reviewed the 'May 30th', and on 'July 1st' we would have displayed the 'June 1st' log. And May 31st would've been invisible. Same arguments for D-180, etc.

Note

February 29th and bissextile years are treated differently. Every bit you'd learnt on that day are being displayed in your "last year" review if your current date is either 28th or 29th of February. This prevents a nasty bug that'd hide your log for this special day.

General options

  • --debug: might display useful information for debugging.
  • --path: overrides the path stored in the configuration file, allowing the user to store log items in different repositories.
  • --today: shortcut to --date=<today's date>. Will work for any command.

Tip

Instead of putting your repository in ~/LearningLog, you may try to save your logs into your Dropbox or Ubuntu One or any other "cloud-based" file-sharing system. This would allow you to have your learning log available on any linked machine, synced elegantly (since the logs are stored in text files, it's very 'Dropbox-like' friendly).

If you want to change the path were the LearningLog is pointing at, just edit the $XDG_CONFIG_DIR/llog/llog.conf and adapt it to your settings.

License terms

This tool is published under the terms of the MIT License, as follows:

Copyright (c) 2009 Bruno Bord

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.