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Convert CRLFs -> LFs in README.

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File README.markdown

-Flip
-====
-
-This is Cat's Eye Technologies' distribution of the game of _Flip_.
-
-Flip is a very simple computer game by John S. James which first appeared
-in the March/April 1977 edition of _Creative Computing_.
-
-In the game, the computer flips a virtual coin 50 times, and the object is
-for you to guess whether the coin will come up heads or tails each time.
-
-What makes it interesting is that the coin is not fair.  The computer tries
-to find patterns in your guesses, and exploit them by biasing the coin toss
-away from what it thinks you are likely to guess next.
-
-This is interesting because humans are actually not all that good at moving
-randomly; we tend to and fall into patterns.  So a pigeon, not thinking
-about the game and pecking haphazardly at "heads" and "tails" buttons, might
-actually be a better Flip player than you or me.
-
-You can think of the program as creating a Markov chain to model your
-guesses, and updating it each time you make a guess, based on your last few
-guesses.  Although, it's not quite that straightforward -- there is some
-randomness thrown in, too.
-
-This version of the game is written in Erlang, based largely on the version
-written in BASIC by Steve North appearing in _More BASIC Computer Games_,
-Ed. David H. Ahl (ISBN 0-89480-137-6).  Note that in this implementation,
-heads and tails are called `Y` and `N`.
-
-Running
--------
-
-To build the `flip` module, run the script `make.sh` from the root
-directory of the distribution.
-
-After the module has been built, the game can be played by running the
-script `flip` in the `bin` directory.  This script can be run from anywhere;
-it knows to locate the module in the distribution directory.
-
-Playing the Game
-----------------
-
-Each time the computer prompts you with a question mark, type 'Y' to
-guess that the flip was heads, or 'N' to guess that the flip was tails.
-A correct guess will be signalled by an asterisk printed before the
-next question mark.  At the end of the run (by default 50 flips,) your
-score will be printed.
-
-License
--------
-
-This work is in the public domain.  See the file `UNLICENSE` for more
-information.
+Flip
+====
+
+This is Cat's Eye Technologies' distribution of the game of _Flip_.
+
+Flip is a very simple computer game by John S. James which first appeared
+in the March/April 1977 edition of _Creative Computing_.
+
+In the game, the computer flips a virtual coin 50 times, and the object is
+for you to guess whether the coin will come up heads or tails each time.
+
+What makes it interesting is that the coin is not fair.  The computer tries
+to find patterns in your guesses, and exploit them by biasing the coin toss
+away from what it thinks you are likely to guess next.
+
+This is interesting because humans are actually not all that good at moving
+randomly; we tend to and fall into patterns.  So a pigeon, not thinking
+about the game and pecking haphazardly at "heads" and "tails" buttons, might
+actually be a better Flip player than you or me.
+
+You can think of the program as creating a Markov chain to model your
+guesses, and updating it each time you make a guess, based on your last few
+guesses.  Although, it's not quite that straightforward -- there is some
+randomness thrown in, too.
+
+This version of the game is written in Erlang, based largely on the version
+written in BASIC by Steve North appearing in _More BASIC Computer Games_,
+Ed. David H. Ahl (ISBN 0-89480-137-6).  Note that in this implementation,
+heads and tails are called `Y` and `N`.
+
+Running
+-------
+
+To build the `flip` module, run the script `make.sh` from the root
+directory of the distribution.
+
+After the module has been built, the game can be played by running the
+script `flip` in the `bin` directory.  This script can be run from anywhere;
+it knows to locate the module in the distribution directory.
+
+Playing the Game
+----------------
+
+Each time the computer prompts you with a question mark, type 'Y' to
+guess that the flip was heads, or 'N' to guess that the flip was tails.
+A correct guess will be signalled by an asterisk printed before the
+next question mark.  At the end of the run (by default 50 flips,) your
+score will be printed.
+
+License
+-------
+
+This work is in the public domain.  See the file `UNLICENSE` for more
+information.