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_posts/2014-04-11-testing_your_chicken_code.md

 #### What does testing give you?
 
 If done right, it gives you a reasonable amount of confidence, that the code you're testing works correctly. Your tests act like a specification for the code under test.
-Secondly they give you a safety net that enables you to change your code and still make sure, that the code works as expected. This means that you're free to refactor your without having to worry, that you broke some, probably distant, part of the code. That is not only true for yourself but also for another person, who wants to contribute to your code.
+Secondly they give you a safety net that enables you to change your code and still make sure, that the code works as expected. This means that you're free to refactor without having to worry, that you broke some, probably distant, part of the code. That is not only true for yourself but also for another person, who wants to contribute to your code.
 
 Closely related to this are regression tests, which are used to detect bugs, that have been fixed sometime in the past, but pop up again, after you have changed some portion of your code. Regression tests are an important part of a test suite. Once you discover a bug, you generally write a test that reproduces it. This test will be naturally be failing as the system/code under test doesn't behave as expected. The next step is to fix the bug and make the test pass. This must be contrasted with the sort of tests that are used to test your features. While those are
 estimates for the correctness of your code, testing for bugs and fixing them can act as a proof. Of course there is no rule without an exception. [Bugs tend to come in clusters](http://testingreflections.com/node/7584) and can be grouped into categories or families. This means in practice that you may have fixed this particular bug but you're advised to look