Source

crcmod /

Filename Size Date modified Message
crcmod
docs
py3
src
test
5.8 KB
545 B
342 B
216 B

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The software in this package is a Python module for generating objects that compute the Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC). There is no attempt in this package to explain how the CRC works. There are a number of resources on the web that give a good explanation of the algorithms. Just do a Google search for "crc calculation" and browse till you find what you need. Another resource can be found in chapter 20 of the book "Numerical Recipes in C" by Press et. al.

This package allows the use of any 8, 16, 24, 32, or 64 bit CRC. You can generate a Python function for the selected polynomial or an instance of the Crc class which provides the same interface as the md5 and sha modules from the Python standard library. A Crc class instance can also generate C/C++ source code that can be used in another application.

Guidelines

If you are simply looking for something to compute a strong checksum (typically referred to as a message digest) over some data, I strongly suggest you use the md5 module. As shown in the timing study below, the MD5 algorithm has about the same performance as a 32-bit CRC generated with this module. In addition, MD5 is a cryptographically strong message digest. As discussed in RFC 1321, the probability of having the same digest for two data sets is 2^-64 which is the same as a 64-bit CRC. A CRC can be fooled into generating the same value by simply adding any multiple of the generator polynomial to the original message. This is very difficult to do with the MD5 algorithm.

If you are still interested in this module, you have an application that requires the use of a CRC. Documentation is available from the doc strings. It is up to you to decide what polynomials to use in your application. If someone has not specified the polynomials to use, you will need to do some research to find one suitable for your application. Examples are available in the unit test script test_crcmod.py and the timing script timing_test.py.

If you need to generate code for another language, I suggest you subclass the Crc class and replace the method generateCode. Use generateCode as a model for the new version.

Installation

The crcmod package is installed using distutils. If you have the tools installed to build a Python extension module, run the following command.

python setup.py install

If you don't have the tools to build an extension module, you will need to install the pure Python version using the following command.

python setup_py.py install

NOTE: The version for Python 3.x is in the py3 directory. The install process is the same but you need to use the 3.x interpreter.

Unit Testing

The script test_crcmod.py is the unit test for crcmod. When you first install the package, you should run this test to make sure everything is installed properly. This script performs a number of tests including a comparison to the direct method which uses a class implementing polynomials over the integers mod 2.

The unit test script also demonstrates how to use the code generator. The result of this is written out to the file examples.c. The generated code was checked to make sure it compiles with the GCC compiler.

Timing

A few timing measurements were taken using the timeit module in the Python standard library. The Python implementation is compared to the extension module, the md5 module in the standard library, and the crc32 function from the binascii module. These measurements were taken on my development system which is a 3GHz Pentium IV with hyper threading running the Debian Sarge distribution of Linux with the 2.6.6 version of the kernel. The Python version is 2.3.3.

The following result was obtained by running the timing_test.py script twice. Once with the Python version and once with the extension module.

Timing in microseconds per iteration min and max of 10 repetitions

CRC: 14981.4, 15035.8 Python implementation CRC: 64.2, 64.4 extension module md5: 59.0, 59.3

crc32: 87.2, 87.4

It is interesting that on this system, the md5 module is slightly faster than a 32-bit CRC even though the message digest is 128-bits and is cryptographically more secure. This is surprising since the MD5 code looks a lot more complex. I tried unrolling the inner loop and using the function interface instead of the class interface. These changes only got the result down to where the MD5 and CRC took about the same amount of time.

Note: the crc32 is slower because it includes a mask operation to get the low order byte of a 32-bit word. A cast is used in the CRC module to accomplish the same thing.