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David Villa Alises committed eb19c55

traducción de títulos de sección

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     </para>
 
 <programlisting>
-  template&lt;typename T> void copy(T* begin, T* end, T* dest) {
-  while(begin != end)
-    *dest++ = *begin++;
-  }
+template&lt;typename T> void copy(T* begin, T* end, T* dest) {
+while(begin != end)
+  *dest++ = *begin++;
+}
 </programlisting>
 
     <!--
   </sect1>
   <sect1>
     <!-- Function objects -->
-    <title> </title>
+    <title>Objetos-función</title>
 
     <!--
     As you study some of the examples earlier in this chapter, you will probably
 
     <sect2>
       <!-- Classification of function objects -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Clasificación de objetos-función</title>
 
       <!--
       The Standard C++ library classifies a function object based on the number of
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Automatic creation of function objects -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Creación automática de objetos-función</title>
 
       <!--
       The <functional> header defines a number of useful generic function
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Adaptable function objects -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Objetos-función adaptables</title>
 
       <!--
       Standard function adaptors such as bind1st( ) and bind2nd( ) make some
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- More function object examples -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Más ejemplos de objetos-función</title>
 
       <!--
       The following FunctionObjects.cpp example provides simple tests for most of the
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Function pointer adaptors -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Adaptadores de puntero a función</title>
 
       <!--
       Wherever a function-like entity is expected by an algorithm, you can supply
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Writing your own function object adaptors -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Escribir sus propios adaptadores de objeto-función</title>
 
       <!--
       Consider how to write a program that converts strings representing
   </sect1>
   <sect1>
     <!-- A catalog of STL algorithms -->
-    <title> </title>
+    <title>Un catálogo de algoritmos STL</title>
 
     <!--
     This section provides a quick reference when you’re searching for the
 
     <sect2>
       <!-- Support tools for example creation -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Herramientas de soporte para la creación de ejemplos</title>
 
       <!--
       It’s useful to create some basic tools to test the algorithms. In the examples
 
       <sect3>
         <!-- Stable vs. unstable reordering -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Reordenación estable vs. inestable</title>
 
         <!--
         A number of the STL algorithms that move elements of a sequence around
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Filling and generating -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Relleno y generación</title>
 
       <!--
       These algorithms let you automatically fill a range with a particular value or
 
       <sect3>
         <!-- Example -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Ejemplo</title>
 
         <!--
         The following example fills and generates into vectors. It also shows the use of
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Counting -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Conteo</title>
 
       <!--
       All containers have a member function size( ) that tells you how many elements
 
       <sect3>
         <!-- Example -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Ejemplo</title>
 
         <!--
         Here, a vector<char> v is filled with random characters (including some
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Manipulating sequences -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Manipulación de secuencias</title>
 
       <!-- These algorithms let you move sequences around. -->
       <para>
 
       <sect3>
         <!-- Example -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Ejemplo</title>
 
         <!-- This gives a basic demonstration of sequence manipulation: -->
         <para>
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Searching and replacing -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Búsqueda y reemplazo</title>
 
       <!--
       All these algorithms are used for searching for one or more objects within a
 
       <sect3>
         <!-- Example -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Ejemplo</title>
 
         <!--
         To provide easy viewing of the results, this example manipulates vectors of
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Comparing ranges -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Comparación de rangos</title>
 
       <!--
       These algorithms provide ways to compare two ranges. At first glance, the
 
       <sect3>
         <!-- Example -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Ejemplo</title>
 
         <!--
         Because the Standard C++ string class is built like a container (it has begin( )
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Removing elements -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Eliminación de elementos</title>
 
       <!--
       Because of the genericity of the STL, the concept of removal is a bit
 
       <sect3>
         <!-- Example -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Ejemplo</title>
 
         <!--
         This example gives a visual demonstration of the way the “remove” and “unique”
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Sorting and operations on sorted ranges -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Ordenación y operación sobre rangos ordenados</title>
 
       <!--
       A significant category of STL algorithms must operate on a sorted range. STL
 
       <sect3>
         <!-- Sorting -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Ordenación</title>
 
         <!--
         The sort algorithms require ranges delimited by random-access iterators, such as
       </sect3>
       <sect3>
         <!-- Example -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Ejemplo</title>
 
         <!--
         The following example turns each input word into an NString and adds it to a
       </sect3>
       <sect3>
         <!-- Merging sorted ranges -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Mezcla de rangos ordenados</title>
 
         <!--
         As before, the first form of each function assumes that the intrinsic operator<
       </sect3>
       <sect3>
         <!-- Example -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Ejemplo</title>
 
         <!--
         It’s easier to see what goes on with merging if ints are used. The following
       </sect3>
       <sect3>
         <!-- Example -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Ejemplo</title>
 
         <!--
         It’s easiest to see the set operations demonstrated using simple vectors of
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Heap operations -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Operaciones sobre el montículo</title>
 
       <!--
       A heap is an array-like data structure used to implement a “priority queue,”
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Applying an operation to each element in a range -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Aplicando una operación a cada elemento de un rango</title>
 
       <!--
       These algorithms move through the entire range and perform an operation on each
 
       <sect3>
         <!-- Examples -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Ejemplos</title>
 
         <!--
         Since much of what you do with objects in a container is to apply an operation
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- Numeric algorithms -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Algoritmos numéricos</title>
 
       <!--
       These algorithms are all tucked into the header <numeric>, since they are
 
       <sect3>
         <!-- Example -->
-        <title> </title>
+        <title>Ejemplo</title>
 
         <!--
         This program tests all the algorithms in <numeric> in both forms, on integer
     </sect2>
     <sect2>
       <!-- General utilities -->
-      <title> </title>
+      <title>Utilidades generales</title>
 
       <!--
       Finally, here are some basic tools that are used with the other algorithms; you
   </sect1>
   <sect1>
     <!-- Creating your own STL–style algorithms -->
-    <title> </title>
+    <title>Creando sus propios algoritmos tipo STL</title>
 
     <!--
     Once you become comfortable with the style of STL algorithms, you can begin to
   </sect1>
   <sect1>
     <!-- Summary -->
-    <title> </title>
+    <title>Resumen</title>
 
     <!--
     The goal of this chapter is to give you a practical understanding of the
   </sect1>
   <sect1>
     <!-- Exercises -->
-    <title> </title>
+    <title>Ejercicios</title>
 
     <!--
     Solutions to selected exercises can be found in the electronic document The
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