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en/ch00-preface.xml

 	    project.</para></listitem>
       </itemizedlist>
 
-      <para id="x_76">Most of these reasons are equally valid---at least in
-	theory---whether you're working on a project by yourself, or
-	with a hundred other people.</para>
+      <para id="x_76">Most of these reasons are equally
+	valid&emdash;at least in theory&emdash;whether you're working
+	on a project by yourself, or with a hundred other
+	people.</para>
 
       <para id="x_77">A key question about the practicality of revision control
 	at these two different scales (<quote>lone hacker</quote> and
     <title>About the examples in this book</title>
 
     <para id="x_84">This book takes an unusual approach to code samples.  Every
-      example is <quote>live</quote>---each one is actually the result
+      example is <quote>live</quote>&emdash;each one is actually the result
       of a shell script that executes the Mercurial commands you see.
       Every time an image of the book is built from its sources, all
       the example scripts are automatically run, and their current
 	centralised system to fall over under the combined load of
 	just a few dozen concurrent users.  Once again, the typical
 	response tends to be an expensive and clunky replication
-	facility.  Since the load on a central server---if you have
-	one at all---is many times lower with a distributed tool
+	facility.  Since the load on a central server&emdash;if you have
+	one at all&emdash;is many times lower with a distributed tool
 	(because all of the data is replicated everywhere), a single
 	cheap server can handle the needs of a much larger team, and
 	replication to balance load becomes a simple matter of

en/ch01-tour-basic.xml

       using Mercurial on your computer immediately.</para>
 
     <sect2>
+      <title>Windows</title>
+
+      <para id="x_c">The best version of Mercurial for Windows is
+	TortoiseHg, which can be found at <ulink
+	  url="http://bitbucket.org/tortoisehg/stable/wiki/Home">http://bitbucket.org/tortoisehg/stable/wiki/Home</ulink>. 
+	This package has no external dependencies; it <quote>just
+	  works</quote>.  It provides both command line and graphical
+	user interfaces.</para>
+
+    </sect2>
+
+    <sect2>
+      <title>Mac OS X</title>
+
+      <para id="x_a">Lee Cantey publishes an installer of Mercurial
+	for Mac OS X at <ulink
+	  url="http://mercurial.berkwood.com">http://mercurial.berkwood.com</ulink>.</para>
+    </sect2>
+
+    <sect2>
       <title>Linux</title>
 
       <para id="x_2">Because each Linux distribution has its own packaging
 	<literal>mercurial</literal>.</para>
 
       <itemizedlist>
-	<listitem><para id="x_4">Debian:</para>
+	<listitem><para id="x_4">Ubuntu and Debian:</para>
 	  <programlisting>apt-get install mercurial</programlisting></listitem>
-	<listitem><para id="x_5">Fedora Core:</para>
+	<listitem><para id="x_5">Fedora and OpenSUSE:</para>
 	  <programlisting>yum install mercurial</programlisting></listitem>
 	<listitem><para id="x_6">Gentoo:</para>
 	  <programlisting>emerge mercurial</programlisting></listitem>
-	<listitem><para id="x_7">OpenSUSE:</para>
-	  <programlisting>yum install mercurial</programlisting></listitem>
-	<listitem><para id="x_8">Ubuntu: Ubuntu's Mercurial package is based on
-	    Debian's.  To install it, run the following
-	    command.</para>
-	  <programlisting>apt-get install mercurial</programlisting></listitem>
       </itemizedlist>
 
     </sect2>
 
       <para id="x_9">SunFreeWare, at <ulink
 	  url="http://www.sunfreeware.com">http://www.sunfreeware.com</ulink>, 
-	is a good source for a large number of pre-built Solaris
-	packages for 32 and 64 bit Intel and Sparc architectures,
-	including current versions of Mercurial.</para>
+	provides prebuilt packages of Mercurial.</para>
 
     </sect2>
-    <sect2>
-      <title>Mac OS X</title>
 
-      <para id="x_a">Lee Cantey publishes an installer of Mercurial for Mac OS
-	X at <ulink
-	  url="http://mercurial.berkwood.com">http://mercurial.berkwood.com</ulink>. 
-	This package works on both Intel- and Power-based Macs. Before
-	you can use it, you must install a compatible version of
-	Universal MacPython <citation>web:macpython</citation>. This
-	is easy to do; simply follow the instructions on Lee's
-	site.</para>
+  </sect1>
 
-      <para id="x_b">It's also possible to install Mercurial using Fink or
-	MacPorts, two popular free package managers for Mac OS X.  If
-	you have Fink, use <command>sudo apt-get install
-	  mercurial-py25</command>.  If MacPorts, <command>sudo port
-	  install mercurial</command>.</para>
-
-    </sect2>
-    <sect2>
-      <title>Windows</title>
-
-      <para id="x_c">Lee Cantey publishes an installer of Mercurial for Windows
-	at <ulink
-	  url="http://mercurial.berkwood.com">http://mercurial.berkwood.com</ulink>. 
-	This package has no external dependencies; it <quote>just
-	  works</quote>.</para>
-
-      <note>
-	<para id="x_d">  The Windows version of Mercurial does not
-	  automatically convert line endings between Windows and Unix
-	  styles.  If you want to share work with Unix users, you must
-	  do a little additional configuration work. XXX Flesh this
-	  out.</para>
-      </note>
-
-    </sect2>
-  </sect1>
   <sect1>
     <title>Getting started</title>
 
 	command to make a copy of a repository, it's best to use a
 	built-in command that Mercurial provides.  This command is
 	called <command role="hg-cmd">hg clone</command>, because it
-	creates an identical copy of an existing repository.</para>
+	makes an identical copy of an existing repository.</para>
 
       &interaction.tour.clone;
 
+      <para>One advantage of using <command role="hg-cmd">hg
+	  clone</command> is that, as we can see above, it lets us clone
+	repositories over the network.  Another is that it remembers
+	where we cloned from, which we'll find useful soon when we
+	want to fetch new changes from another repository.</para>
+
       <para id="x_14">If our clone succeeded, we should now have a local
 	directory called <filename class="directory">hello</filename>.
 	This directory will contain some files.</para>
       <para id="x_15">These files have the same contents and history in our
 	repository as they do in the repository we cloned.</para>
 
-      <para id="x_16">Every Mercurial repository is complete, self-contained,
-	and independent.  It contains its own private copy of a
-	project's files and history.  A cloned repository remembers
-	the location of the repository it was cloned from, but it does
-	not communicate with that repository, or any other, unless you
-	tell it to.</para>
+      <para id="x_16">Every Mercurial repository is complete,
+	self-contained, and independent.  It contains its own private
+	copy of a project's files and history.  As we just mentioned,
+	a cloned repository remembers the location of the repository
+	it was cloned from, but Mercurial will not communicate with
+	that repository, or any other, unless you tell it to.</para>
 
       <para id="x_17">What this means for now is that we're free to experiment
 	with our repository, safe in the knowledge that it's a private
     <para id="x_1b">One of the first things we might want to do with a new,
       unfamiliar repository is understand its history.  The <command
 	role="hg-cmd">hg log</command> command gives us a view of
-      history.</para>
+      the history of changes in the repository.</para>
 
     &interaction.tour.log;
 
 
     <para id="x_1d">The fields in a record of output from <command
 	role="hg-cmd">hg log</command> are as follows.</para>
+
     <itemizedlist>
-      <listitem><para id="x_1e"><literal>changeset</literal>: This field has the
-	  format of a number, followed by a colon, followed by a
-	  hexadecimal string.  These are
-	  <emphasis>identifiers</emphasis> for the changeset.  There
-	  are two identifiers because the number is shorter and easier
-	  to type than the hex string.</para></listitem>
+      <listitem><para id="x_1e"><literal>changeset</literal>: This
+	  field has the format of a number, followed by a colon,
+	  followed by a hexadecimal (or <emphasis>hex</emphasis>)
+	  string.  These are <emphasis>identifiers</emphasis> for the
+	  changeset.  The hex string is a unique identifier: the same
+	  hex string will always refer to the same changeset. The
+	  number is shorter and easier to type than the hex string,
+	  but it isn't unique: the same number in two different clones
+	  of a repository may identify different changesets.  Why
+	  provide the number at all, then?  For local
+	  convenience.</para>
+      </listitem>
       <listitem><para id="x_1f"><literal>user</literal>: The identity of the
 	  person who created the changeset.  This is a free-form
 	  field, but it most often contains a person's name and email
 	  person who created the changeset.)</para></listitem>
       <listitem><para id="x_21"><literal>summary</literal>: The first line of
 	  the text message that the creator of the changeset entered
-	  to describe the changeset.</para></listitem></itemizedlist>
-    <para id="x_22">The default output printed by <command role="hg-cmd">hg
-	log</command> is purely a summary; it is missing a lot of
-      detail.</para>
+	  to describe the changeset.</para></listitem>
+      <listitem>
+	<para>Some changesets, such as the first in the list above,
+	  have a <literal>tag</literal> field.  A tag is another way
+	  to identify a changeset, by giving it an easy-to-remember
+	  name. (The tag named <literal>tip</literal> is special: it
+	  always refers to the newest change in a repository.)</para>
+      </listitem>
+    </itemizedlist>
+
+    <para id="x_22">The default output printed by <command
+	role="hg-cmd">hg log</command> is purely a summary; it is
+      missing a lot of detail.</para>
 
     <para id="x_23"><xref linkend="fig:tour-basic:history"/> provides
       a graphical representation of the history of the <filename
 	  log</command> identifies a changeset using both a number and
 	a hexadecimal string.</para>
       <itemizedlist>
-	<listitem><para id="x_27">The revision number is <emphasis>only valid in
-	      that repository</emphasis>,</para></listitem>
-	<listitem><para id="x_28">while the hex string is the
+	<listitem><para id="x_27">The revision number is a handy
+	    notation that is <emphasis>only valid in that
+	      repository</emphasis>.</para></listitem>
+	<listitem><para id="x_28">The hexadecimal string is the
 	    <emphasis>permanent, unchanging identifier</emphasis> that
 	    will always identify that exact changeset in
 	    <emphasis>every</emphasis> copy of the
 	    repository.</para></listitem></itemizedlist>
-      <para id="x_29">This distinction is important.  If you send someone an
-	email talking about <quote>revision 33</quote>, there's a high
-	likelihood that their revision 33 will <emphasis>not be the
-	  same</emphasis> as yours.  The reason for this is that a
-	revision number depends on the order in which changes arrived
-	in a repository, and there is no guarantee that the same
-	changes will happen in the same order in different
-	repositories. Three changes $a,b,c$ can easily appear in one
-	repository as $0,1,2$, while in another as $1,0,2$.</para>
+
+      <para id="x_29">This distinction is important.  If you send
+	someone an email talking about <quote>revision 33</quote>,
+	there's a high likelihood that their revision 33 will
+	<emphasis>not be the same</emphasis> as yours.  The reason for
+	this is that a revision number depends on the order in which
+	changes arrived in a repository, and there is no guarantee
+	that the same changes will happen in the same order in
+	different repositories. Three changes <literal>a,b,c</literal>
+	can easily appear in one repository as
+	<literal>0,1,2</literal>, while in another as
+	<literal>0,2,1</literal>.</para>
 
       <para id="x_2a">Mercurial uses revision numbers purely as a convenient
 	shorthand.  If you need to discuss a changeset with someone,
 	  log</command> down to a single revision, use the <option
 	  role="hg-opt-log">-r</option> (or <option
 	  role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option>) option.  You can use
-	either a revision number or a long-form changeset identifier,
+	either a revision number or a hexadecimal identifier,
 	and you can provide as many revisions as you want.</para>
 
       &interaction.tour.log-r;
 
       &interaction.tour.log-vp;
 
+      <para>The <option role="hg-opt-log">-p</option> option is
+	tremendously useful, so it's well worth remembering.</para>
+
     </sect2>
   </sect1>
+
   <sect1>
     <title>All about command options</title>
 
       dealing with the options that you can pass to commands.  It
       follows the conventions for options that are common to modern
       Linux and Unix systems.</para>
+
     <itemizedlist>
-      <listitem><para id="x_32">Every option has a long name.  For example, as
+      <listitem>
+	<para id="x_32">Every option has a long name.  For example, as
 	  we've already seen, the <command role="hg-cmd">hg
 	    log</command> command accepts a <option
-	    role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option> option.</para></listitem>
-      <listitem><para id="x_33">Most options have short names, too.  Instead of
-	  <option role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option>, we can use <option
-	    role="hg-opt-log">-r</option>.  (The reason that some
-	  options don't have short names is that the options in
-	  question are rarely used.)</para></listitem>
-      <listitem><para id="x_34">Long options start with two dashes (e.g. <option
-	    role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option>), while short options
-	  start with one (e.g. <option
-	    role="hg-opt-log">-r</option>).</para></listitem>
-      <listitem><para id="x_35">Option naming and usage is consistent across
+	    role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option> option.</para>
+      </listitem>
+      <listitem>
+	<para id="x_33">Most options have short names, too.  Instead
+	  of <option role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option>, we can use
+	  <option role="hg-opt-log">-r</option>.  (The reason that
+	  some options don't have short names is that the options in
+	  question are rarely used.)</para>
+      </listitem>
+      <listitem>
+	<para id="x_34">Long options start with two dashes (e.g.
+	  <option role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option>), while short
+	  options start with one (e.g. <option
+	    role="hg-opt-log">-r</option>).</para>
+      </listitem>
+      <listitem>
+	<para id="x_35">Option naming and usage is consistent across
 	  commands.  For example, every command that lets you specify
 	  a changeset ID or revision number accepts both <option
 	    role="hg-opt-log">-r</option> and <option
-	    role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option>
-	  arguments.</para></listitem></itemizedlist>
+	    role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option> arguments.</para>
+      </listitem>
+      <listitem>
+	<para>If you are using short options, you can save typing by
+	  running them together. For example, the command <command
+	    role="hg-cmd">hg log -v -p -r 2</command> can be written
+	  as <command role="hg-cmd">hg log -vpr2</command>.</para>
+      </listitem>
+    </itemizedlist>
+
     <para id="x_36">In the examples throughout this book, I use short options
       instead of long.  This just reflects my own preference, so don't
       read anything significant into it.</para>
       less when passed <option role="hg-opt-global">-q</option> (or
       <option role="hg-opt-global">--quiet</option>).</para>
 
+    <note>
+      <title>Option naming consistency</title>
+
+      <para>Almost always, Mercurial commands use consistent option
+	names to refer to the same concepts.  For instance, if a
+	command deals with changesets, you'll always identify them
+	with <option role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option> or <option
+	  role="hg-opt-log">-r</option>.  This consistent use of
+	option names makes it easier to remember what options a
+	particular command takes.</para>
+    </note>
+
   </sect1>
   <sect1>
     <title>Making and reviewing changes</title>
       the remote repository.  Since we already have a copy of it
       locally, we can just clone that instead.  This is much faster
       than cloning over the network, and cloning a local repository
-      uses less disk space in most cases, too.</para>
+      uses less disk space in most cases, too<footnote>
+	<para>The saving of space arises when source and destination
+	  repositories are on the same filesystem, in which case
+	  Mercurial will use hardlinks to do copy-on-write sharing of
+	  its internal metadata.  If that explanation meant nothing to
+	  you, don't worry: everything happens transparently and
+	  automatically, and you don't need to understand it.</para>
+	</footnote>.</para>
 
     &interaction.tour.reclone;
 
 
     <para id="x_3b">In our <filename class="directory">my-hello</filename>
       repository, we have a file <filename>hello.c</filename> that
-      contains the classic <quote>hello, world</quote> program. Let's
-      use the ancient and venerable <command>sed</command> command to
-      edit this file so that it prints a second line of output.  (I'm
-      only using <command>sed</command> to do this because it's easy
-      to write a scripted example this way.  Since you're not under
-      the same constraint, you probably won't want to use
-      <command>sed</command>; simply use your preferred text editor to
-      do the same thing.)</para>
+      contains the classic <quote>hello, world</quote> program.</para>
 
-    &interaction.tour.sed;
+    &interaction.tour.cat1;
+
+    <para>Let's edit this file so that it prints a second line of
+      output.</para>
+
+    &interaction.tour.cat2;
 
     <para id="x_3c">Mercurial's <command role="hg-cmd">hg status</command>
       command will tell us what Mercurial knows about the files in the
       file after we were done; it was able to figure this out
       itself.</para>
 
-    <para id="x_3f">It's a little bit helpful to know that we've modified
+    <para id="x_3f">It's somewhat helpful to know that we've modified
       <filename>hello.c</filename>, but we might prefer to know
       exactly <emphasis>what</emphasis> changes we've made to it.  To
       do this, we use the <command role="hg-cmd">hg diff</command>
 
     &interaction.tour.diff;
 
+    <tip>
+      <title>Understanding patches</title>
+
+      <para>Remember to take a look at <xref
+	  linkend="sec:mq:patch"/> if you don't know how to read
+	output above.</para>
+    </tip>
   </sect1>
   <sect1>
     <title>Recording changes in a new changeset</title>
 	    configuration settings.  The initial contents of your
 	    <filename role="special">.hgrc</filename> should look like
 	    this.</para>
+
+	<remark>Figure out what the appropriate directory is on
+	  Windows.</remark>
+
 	<programlisting># This is a Mercurial configuration file.
 [ui]
-username = Firstname Lastname
-&lt;email.address@domain.net&gt;</programlisting>
+username = Firstname Lastname &lt;email.address@domain.net&gt;</programlisting>
 
 	<para id="x_4b">The <quote><literal>[ui]</literal></quote> line begins a
 	  <emphasis>section</emphasis> of the config file, so you can
 
 	<para id="x_4c">You can use any text you like as the value of
 	    the <literal>username</literal> config item, since this
-	    information is for reading by other people, but for
-	    interpreting by Mercurial.  The convention that most
+	    information is for reading by other people, but will not be
+	    interpreted by Mercurial.  The convention that most
 	    people follow is to use their name and email address, as
 	    in the example above.</para>
 	<note>
 
       <para id="x_4f">The editor that the <command role="hg-cmd">hg
 	    commit</command> command drops us into will contain an
-	  empty line, followed by a number of lines starting with
+	  empty line or two, followed by a number of lines starting with
 	  <quote><literal>HG:</literal></quote>.</para>
 
-    <programlisting>XXX fix this XXX</programlisting>
+    <programlisting>
+This is where I type my commit comment.
+
+HG: Enter commit message.  Lines beginning with 'HG:' are removed.
+HG: --
+HG: user: Bryan O'Sullivan &lt;bos@serpentine.com&gt;
+HG: branch 'default'
+HG: changed hello.c</programlisting>
 
       <para id="x_50">Mercurial ignores the lines that start with
 	  <quote><literal>HG:</literal></quote>; it uses them only to
 
       &interaction.tour.tip;
 
-      <para id="x_57">We refer to
-	  the newest revision in the repository as the tip revision,
-	  or simply the tip.</para>
+      <para id="x_57">We refer to the newest revision in the
+	repository as the <emphasis>tip revision</emphasis>, or simply
+	the <emphasis>tip</emphasis>.</para>
+
+      <para>By the way, the <command role="hg-cmd">hg tip</command>
+	command accepts many of the same options as <command
+	  role="hg-cmd">hg log</command>, so <option
+	  role="hg-opt-global">-v</option> above indicates <quote>be
+	  verbose</quote>, <option role="hg-opt-tip">-p</option>
+	specifies <quote>print a patch</quote>.  The use of <option
+	  role="hg-opt-tip">-p</option> to print patches is another
+	example of the consistent naming we mentioned earlier.</para>
     </sect2>
   </sect1>
 
 
       &interaction.tour.incoming;
 
-      <para id="x_5b">(Of course, someone could
-	  cause more changesets to appear in the repository that we
-	  ran <command role="hg-cmd">hg incoming</command> in, before
-	  we get a chance to <command role="hg-cmd">hg pull</command>
-	  the changes, so that we could end up pulling changes that we
-	  didn't expect.)</para>
+      <para id="x_5b">Suppose you're pulling changes from a repository
+      on the network somewhere. While you are looking at the <command
+	  role="hg-cmd">hg incoming</command> output, and before you
+	pull those changes, someone might have committed something in
+	the remote repository. This means that it's possible to pull
+	more changes than you saw when using <command
+	  role="hg-cmd">hg incoming</command>.</para>
 
       <para id="x_5c">Bringing changes into a repository is a simple
 	  matter of running the <command role="hg-cmd">hg
 	can use <command role="hg-cmd">hg update</command> to update
 	the working directory to the state it was in at <emphasis>any
 	  revision</emphasis> in the history of the repository.  If
-	you had the working directory updated to an old revision---to
-	hunt down the origin of a bug, say---and ran a <command
+	you had the working directory updated to an old revision&emdash;to
+	hunt down the origin of a bug, say&emdash;and ran a <command
 	  role="hg-cmd">hg pull</command> which automatically updated
 	the working directory to a new revision, you might not be
 	terribly happy.</para>
 
       &interaction.tour.push;
 
-      <para id="x_69">As with
-	  <command role="hg-cmd">hg pull</command>, the <command
-	    role="hg-cmd">hg push</command> command does not update
-	  the working directory in the repository that it's pushing
-	  changes into. (Unlike <command role="hg-cmd">hg
-	    pull</command>, <command role="hg-cmd">hg push</command>
-	  does not provide a <literal>-u</literal> option that updates
-	  the other repository's working directory.)</para>
+      <para id="x_69">As with <command role="hg-cmd">hg
+	  pull</command>, the <command role="hg-cmd">hg push</command>
+	command does not update the working directory in the
+	repository that it's pushing changes into. Unlike <command
+	  role="hg-cmd">hg pull</command>, <command role="hg-cmd">hg
+	  push</command> does not provide a <literal>-u</literal>
+	option that updates the other repository's working directory.
+	This asymmetry is deliberate: the repository we're pushing to
+	might be on a remote server and shared between several people.
+	If we were to update its working directory while someone was
+	working in it, their work would be disrupted.</para>
 
       <para id="x_6a">What happens if we try to pull or push changes
 	  and the receiving repository already has those changes?

en/examples/auto-snippets.xml

 <!ENTITY interaction.tour-merge-conflict.pull SYSTEM "results/tour-merge-conflict.pull.lxo">
 <!ENTITY interaction.tour-merge-conflict.son SYSTEM "results/tour-merge-conflict.son.lxo">
 <!ENTITY interaction.tour-merge-conflict.wife SYSTEM "results/tour-merge-conflict.wife.lxo">
+<!ENTITY interaction.tour.cat1 SYSTEM "results/tour.cat1.lxo">
+<!ENTITY interaction.tour.cat2 SYSTEM "results/tour.cat2.lxo">
 <!ENTITY interaction.tour.clone SYSTEM "results/tour.clone.lxo">
 <!ENTITY interaction.tour.clone-pull SYSTEM "results/tour.clone-pull.lxo">
 <!ENTITY interaction.tour.clone-push SYSTEM "results/tour.clone-push.lxo">
 hg clone hello my-hello
 cd my-hello
 
-#$ name: sed
+#$ name: cat1
+cat hello.c
+
+#$ name:
 
 sed -i '/printf/a\\tprintf("hello again!\\n");' hello.c
 
+#$ name: cat2
+# ... edit edit edit ...
+cat hello.c
+
 #$ name: status
 
 ls