kcrisman avatar kcrisman committed 0cafb3e Draft

Added non-command content and other stuff

Finished off good draft of Sage history etc.
Finished off good draft and pictures for next steps for users
Added more references to Sage cell server as appropriate
Other pictures
Added outline of pedagogical issues page

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Files changed (7)

 
 <h1>How to Use Sage in the Classroom</h1>
 
-<p>FIXME: Make this actual content, not just ideas</p>
+<p>FIXME: Make more actual content, not just ideas</p>
 
-<p>If the reader has come this far, she probably is ready to start talking about how to use Sage in 
+<p>If the reader has come this far, she probably is ready to start talking more about how to use Sage in
 the classroom!  This section takes a step back from nitty-gritty and looks at those big things.</p>
 
-	<ul>
-		<li><a href="#Sharing" class="internal">Sharing Sage Worksheets</a></li>
-		<li><a href="#Labs" class="internal">Lab Work and Research</a></li>
-		<li><a href="#Sagelets" class="internal">Interactive Sagelets</a></li>
-	</ul>
+    <ul>
+        <li><a href="#Demos" class="internal">In-Class Demos</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#CheatSheet" class="internal">Cheat Sheets of Shortcuts</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Sharing" class="internal">Sharing Sage Worksheets</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#CellServer" class="internal">Sage Cell Server</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Labs" class="internal">Lab Work</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Research" class="internal">Research</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Sagelets" class="internal">Interactive Sagelets</a></li>
+    </ul>
+
+<h2 id="Demos">In-Class Demos</h2>
+
+<p>Say something about how to do this in the classroom.</p>
+
+<h2 id="CheatSheet">Cheat Sheets of Shortcuts</h2>
+
+<p>Say something about how to do this in the classroom.</p>
 
 <h2 id="Sharing">Sharing Sage Worksheets</h2>
 
-<p>What should we say about this?  My main point is that whether it is used as a cheat sheet or used 
-for showing people how to do certain things, it's good.  Maybe start pointing to great examples, like 
-John Perry's at USM or some of Rob Beezer's, or something?  Probably that is a good idea.  But we want 
+<p>What should we say about this?  My main point is that whether it is used as a cheat sheet or used
+for showing people how to do certain things, it's good.  Maybe start pointing to great examples, like
+John Perry's at USM or some of Rob Beezer's, or something?  Probably that is a good idea.  But we want
 variety.</p>
 
-<h2 id="Labs">Lab Work and Research</h2>
+<h2 id="CellServer">Sage Cell Server</h2>
+
+<p>Say something about how to use this in the classroom.</p>
+
+<h2 id="Labs">Lab Work</h2>
 
 <p>There are alternate ways to use Sage as well.  Many people use computers to create great
-lab experiences for mathematics students, especially in calculus.  However, Sage is a 
-wonderful outlet for students beginning research too.</p>
+lab experiences for mathematics students, especially in calculus.</p>
 
-<h3 id="Labs">Lab Experiences</h3>
-
-<p>We need a few good examples of generic lab stuff here.  Not necessarily Sage-related.  Obviously 
+<p>We need a few good examples of generic lab stuff here.  Not necessarily Sage-related.  Obviously
 this will reference the stuff on <a href="#Sagelets" class="internal">@interacts</a>.</p>
 
-<h3 id="Research">Undergraduate Research</h3>
+<h2 id="Research">Research</h2>
 
-<p>I have something minor which can be referenced from the Sage special session in DC, and Robert 
+<p>  However, Sage is a
+wonderful outlet for students beginning research too.
+I have something minor which can be referenced from the Sage special session in DC, and Robert
 Miller has nice examples of this in graph theory.  I am sure there are others!</p>
 
 <h2 id="Sagelets">Interactive Sagelets</h2>
 
 <h3>From Static to Dynamic Mathematics</h3>
 
-<p>Here we discuss them.  Liberally reference Geogebra, including articles in JOMA/Loci, and the 
-Wolfram Demonstrations project and/or Maplets and other free applets.  Point to specific examples 
-which are <em>not</em> gigantic on the Wiki page, probably on the worksheet at #Sagelets.  There 
-aren't any which are really small to cut and paste?  Then let's write some!</p>
+<p>Here we discuss them.  Liberally reference Geogebra, including articles in JOMA/Loci, and the
+Wolfram Demonstrations project and/or Maplets and other free applets.  Point to specific examples
+which are <em>not</em> gigantic on the Wiki page, probably on the worksheet at #Sagelets.  Or what
+about <a href="http://interact.sagemath.org/">the interact database</a>?  Also a place that maybe
+belongs in the community part... </p>
 
 <p>Point out that this is a growing field, and that you don't have to be a programmer to do it.</p>
 
 <h3 id="NoCutPaste">But I Don't Want to Just Cut and Paste those Sagelets!</h3>
 
-<p>Here, of course, we say that it is quite easy to create them, and point to the <a 
+<p>Here, of course, we say that it is quite easy to create them, and point to the <a
 href="http://mathdl.maa.org/mathDL/4/InteractArticle.html">companion article</a>!</p>
 
 
 
 <p>A wealth of information about Sage is available online. The main
 source for online documentation
-is <a href="http://sagemath.org/doc/"><tt>sagemath.org/doc</tt></a>, which includes the 
+is <a href="http://sagemath.org/doc/"><tt>sagemath.org/doc</tt></a>, which includes the
 <a href="http://sagemath.org/doc/tutorial/">Sage tutorial</a>
 and <a href="http://sagemath.org/doc/reference/">comprehensive
 reference manual</a>. If you later want to contribute to Sage, there
 <li>
 The <a href="http://groups.google.com/group/sage-support">sage-support</a> email list
 </li>
-<li> 
+<li>
 The "<a href="http://ask.sagemath.org/">Ask Sage</a>" site, which is a question-and-answer site
 similar to resources such as <a href="http://mathoverflow.net">MathOverflow</a> or <a href="http://answers.yahoo.com/">Yahoo! Answers</a>.</p>
 </li></ul>
+
+<img src="screenshots/AskSage.png" />
+
+
+
 There are many more mailing lists mentioned on
 the <a href="http://www.sagemath.org/development.html#mailingList">the
 Sage development page</a>.
 <img src="screenshots/f_dot_tab_completion.png" />
 
 <p>As you can see, there are a <strong>lot</strong> of options!</p>
-<p>Most of them should be considered as functions (which they are, 
+<p>Most of them should be considered as functions (which they are,
 in the Python/programming language sense).  How does one use a function?  With
 a paired set of open/close parentheses.</p>
 
 <img src="screenshots/f_dot_arccos.png" />
 
 <p>In this case, there is only one kind of arccosine you can do to the function.
-However, one can do an integral with respect to any variable one likes, so 
+However, one can do an integral with respect to any variable one likes, so
 the syntax may require an argument to the function, like <code>f.integrate(x)</code>.</p>
 
-<p>The reason for all this is that Sage inherits from Python 
+<p>The reason for all this is that Sage inherits from Python
 (<a href=#python>see below</a>), which is an
 object-oriented programming language. The important point is that
 placing a dot after any given mathematical thing you create should
 <p>Knowing something's name isn't the same as getting actual information
 about it, of course.   If you know the name of an object or command you want
 information about, you can simply append "?" to it, and either press
-Tab or evaluate.</p>  
+Tab or evaluate.</p>
 
 <p>Try evaluating <code>sin?</code>
 or <code>solve?</code> or <code>P?</code> in your worksheet from the
 difficult to find out if the one you want has been
 implemented. Fortunately, there's a function that will help you find
 other functions: <code>search_def</code> searches function
-definitions.</p> 
+definitions.</p>
 
 <p>For example, if you want to do something related to
 spanning trees of a graph, you might
 <p>Instead of inventing a new programming language, Sage is based
 on <a href="http://python.org">Python</a>. Python is very well-regarded
 and widely used throughout industry and academia; it is considered easy
-to learn, and has been around for over two decades.  
+to learn, and has been around for over two decades.
 Sage's syntax is almost exactly
-identical to Python's, and any Python code will work in Sage -- so
+identical to Python's, and nearly any Python code will work in Sage -- so
 learning Python helps you work with Sage.</p>
 
-<p>There is an enormous variety of resources on Python: a 
+<p>There is an enormous variety of resources on Python: a
  <a href="http://wiki.python.org/moin/PythonBooks">wide variety of
  books</a> aimed at many audiences, in various (human) languages, and
  countless <a href="http://wiki.python.org/moin/BeginnersGuide/NonProgrammers">web
- pages</a>. We particularly recommend 
+ pages</a>. We particularly recommend
 <a href="http://www.greenteapress.com/thinkpython/">Allen B.
  Downey's <i>Python for Software Design: How to Think Like a Computer
  Scientist</i></a>.</p>
 
-<!-- 
+<!--
 What about this?  It's dead, though there are mirrors.  Still?
 <a href="http://diveintopython.org">Mark Pilgrim's <i>Dive
- Into Python</i></a> and 
+ Into Python</i></a> and
 -->
 
 <p>Many of your students will also encounter Python in other classes or
 <p>Although many readers will have used comprehensive mathematics software before, we will assume <em>no</em> background knowledge here.  Further, although one can easily download and use Sage on a variety of operating systems, our goal is to demonstrate actual classroom use, and hence we'll focus on how to get started using <em>only</em> the notebook interface.</p>
 
 <p>In this first section, we actually will try to introduce Sage
-  generically as much as possible, without doing much mathematics. (To
-  start right off with the math, please go to
-  the <a href="Mathematics.html">"Doing Mathematics with Sage"
-  section</a>.)</p>
+  generically as much as possible, without doing much mathematics.</p>
 
 		<ul>
 			<li><a href="Started.html" class="internal">Getting Started with the Online Notebook</a></li>
 			Help and Discovering Sage's Abilities</a></li>
 		</ul>
 
-<p>So to follow along, open up another browser window and get ready to use Sage!  Standards-compliant browsers like Firefox are best, but most modern browsers should work just fine.</p> 
+<p>So to follow along, open up another browser window and get ready to use Sage!  Standards-compliant browsers like Firefox are best, but most modern browsers should work just fine.</p>
+
+<p>If you are already comfortable with the idea of evaluating cells and want to get right to the good stuff,
+please go to the <a href="Mathematics.html">"Doing Mathematics with Sage" section</a>.  You can either follow along
+with the commands in a Sage notebook session, at a Sage cell server like <a href="http://aleph.sagemath.org/">http://aleph.sagemath.org/</a>,
+or try them out yourself with the embedded Sage cells in the pages.</p>
 
 <div class="footer">
 <p>Up: <a href="index.html#Contents" class="internal">Contents</a> |
 
 <h2 id="NewContent">Adding Content - Word Processing, links, and LaTeX</h2>
 
-<p>Thanks to <a href="" target="_blank" class="external" title="Open external site in a new window">the 
-mini-word processor TinyMCE</a> and a TeX rendering engine called <a href="" target="_blank" 
-class="external" title="Open external site in a new window">jsmath</a>, you can put much more in Sage 
-than Mathematics - making it perfect for making class notes.  FIXME: Or MathJax?</p>
+<p>Thanks to <a href="" target="_blank" class="external" title="Open external site in a new window">the
+mini-word processor TinyMCE</a> and a TeX rendering engine called <a href="" target="_blank"
+class="external" title="Open external site in a new window">jsmath</a>, you can put much more in Sage
+than Mathematics - making it perfect for making class notes.  FIXME: By the time this is published, probably MathJax?</p>
 
-<p>Here, we give a small sample of what is 
+<p>Here, we give a small sample of what is
 possible.</p>
 
 <h4>Word Processing</h4>
 <p>Recall that between any two "computation cells" there is a thin blue line waiting, which a scroll
 over with the mouse reveals.  Clicking on this line gives a new computational cell.</p>
 
-<p>Go over one such line, but do <em>not</em> click.  Instead, first press (and hold down) the Shift key. 
-<em>Then</em> click, while still holding the Shift key.  Once you let go, a tiny word processor should open up.  
+<p>Go over one such line, but do <em>not</em> click.  Instead, first press (and hold down) the Shift key.
+<em>Then</em> click, while still holding the Shift key.  Once you let go, a tiny word processor should open up.
 This is where one can do just about any normal word processing one wishes.</p>
 
-<p>FIXME: Add screenshots.</p>
+<img src="screenshots/ShiftClick.png" />
+
 
 <p>Simply typing will behave as normal.  There are buttons for ordered and unordered lists, various typefaces,
 <b>bold</b>, <em>italic</em>, and so forth.  This is especially useful for annotating class notes; however,
 it is also heavily used for putting brief <em>formatted</em> explanations in research worksheets as well.</p>
 
-<p>FIXME: Screenshot with a few of these.</p>
+<img src="screenshots/StrikeThrough.png" />
 
-<p>Once one is done (this is a WYSIWYG editor, so it should look pretty much like the output), one can 
+<p>Once one is done (this is a WYSIWYG editor, so it should look pretty much like the output), one can
 close the editor with the button, or press Shift-Enter as in evaluating a cell; either option will
 close the editor and give nicely formatted text.</p>
 
 <h4>Links</h4>
 
 <p>Because a Sage worksheet is a webpage as well, and in this article we assume it is being accessed through
-the internet and not locally, it is incredibly helpful to take advantage of web links.  For instance, 
+the internet and not locally, it is incredibly helpful to take advantage of web links.  For instance,
 the authors often will use this to put in a reference to a reference to more information about a mathematical
-object, or to some fun site like the <a href="http://www.mersenne.org">Great Internet Mersenne 
+object, or to some fun site like the <a href="http://www.mersenne.org">Great Internet Mersenne
 Prime Search</a>.  Course management system sites or course home pages are also useful links.</p>
 
-<p>Adding a link is easy inside the editor.  
+<p>Adding a link is easy inside the editor.
 <ul>
 <li>Open the editor.</li>
 <li>Type some text to be linked.</li>
 <li>Highlight the exact text which will be linked.</li>
-<li>Click on the icon for a web link. (FIXME: picture)</li>
+<li>Click on the icon for a web link (see screenshot below).</li>
 <li>Put in the <em>entire</em> address, including "http://", of the link.</li>
-<li>(Alternately, you may want to choose the "open in new window" option.)</li>
+<li>(Optionally, you may want to choose the "open in new window" option.)</li>
 <li>Close the web link window, and the editor.</li>
 </ul>
 Your link should now work!</p>
 
+<img src="screenshots/WebLink.png" />
+
+
+
 <h4>LaTeX</h4>
 
-<p>One of the most annoying things about most word processing for mathematicians 
-is that it can be tedious to insert formulas.  What we wouldn't give for just being able to 
-put dollar signs around "x^2" and have it instantly be understood.</p>
+<p>One of the most annoying things about most word processing for mathematicians
+is that it can be tedious to insert formulas.  What wouldn't we give for just being able to
+put dollar signs around "x^2" and have it instantly be understood?</p>
 
-<p>Sage uses the same technology as sites like <a href="http://www.ams.org/mathscinet/index.html">MathSciNet</a>
+<p>Sage uses the same technology (FIXME: jsmath or MathJax?) as sites like <a href="http://www.ams.org/mathscinet/index.html">MathSciNet</a>
 and <a href="http://mathoverflow.net/">Math Overflow</a> to make this easy.  Once again, open up
 a TinyMCE editor in the notebook, but this time put some dollar signs around some math notation.</p>
 
-<p>FIXME: Add a screenshot</p>
+<img src="screenshots/AddLaTeX.png" />
 
-<p>Once you close the window, things should render properly.  It's possible to do quite complicated things.  FIXME: Screenshot</p>
 
-<p>It can take a while to render a long worksheet, but it's well worth it; things look much more professional, 
-and easier to understand for your students.</p>
+<p>Once you close the window, things should render properly.  It's possible to do quite complicated things.</p>
+
+<img src="screenshots/LaTeXAdded.png" />
+
+
+<p>It can take a while to render a long worksheet, but it's well worth it; things look much more professional,
+and are easier to understand for your students.</p>
 
 <h2 id="CommandLine">What if I want a command line?</h2>
 
-<p>The user aimed at in this article is one who has used the computer mostly in a graphical interface, 
-so we focus on the notebook.  However, once one has gained minimal facility with Sage, it can be nice to 
-have direct access to Sage. This could be for a one-off computation for which opening a new worksheet 
+<p>The user aimed at in this article is one who has used the computer mostly in a graphical interface,
+so we focus on the notebook.  However, once one has gained minimal facility with Sage, it can be nice to
+have more direct access to Sage. This could be for a one-off computation for which opening a new worksheet
 seems overly much, or to interact more easily with the computer itself.</p>
 
-<p>The first thing you will need is a connection to a Sage program that is not on the web.  This could 
+<p>The first thing you will need is a connection to a Sage program that is not on the web.  This could
 be on a college network, or in a local copy.   Most readers would probably just use a local Sage on their
 computer, so see <a href="Started.html#Offline">below</a> for how to do that.</p>
 
 <p>In either case, the next thing to do is open a terminal window of some kind.  If you do not know what that means,
 then this section is not for you.  In fact, the developers of Sage are pretty explicit about believing that the
-main interaction with Sage should be through the browser, because it is so much easier to share and see.</p>
+main interaction with Sage should always be possible through the browser, because it is so much easier to share and see.</p>
 
 <p>Once you are there, you will need to "cd" to the directory in which Sage is located.  This will probably look
-like "sage-4.7.1" or something similar.  Then simply type "./sage", and you are on your way.  
+like "sage-4.7.1" or something similar.  Then simply type "./sage", and you are on your way.
 Many people will make an alias so they can just use "sage"; adding the Sage directory to your "PATH"
 will also work.</p>
 
-<p>There are a few particularly useful commands.
+<img src="screenshots/Terminal.png" />
+
+
+<p>There are a few particularly useful options to the "sage" command which access different things.
 <ul>
-<li>"sage -maxima", "sage -gap", and so forth, will start version of the constituent programs.</li> 
+<li>"sage -maxima", "sage -gap", and so forth, will start version of the constituent programs.</li>
 <li>"sage -notebook" will start your very own notebook server.</li>
-<li>FIXME: others?</li>
+<li>"sage -advanced" will give you a complete list of advanced commands.</li>
 </ul></p>
 
 <h2 id="Offline">How do I use Sage offline?</h2>
 
-<p>Most of this article assumes that one is using Sage through a notebook browser on the internet.  
-However, in reality one often wants to work when the wider web is not available.  What should you do 
+<p>Most of this article assumes that one is using Sage through a notebook browser on the internet.
+However, in reality one often wants to work when the wider web is not available.  What should you do
 then?</p>
 
-<p>Luckily, Sage is just a free download away!  It is easiest to go to <a href="http://www.sagemath.org" 
-target="_blank" class="external" title="Open external site in a new window">the Sage website</a> and 
-follow instructions there for your system, but we also provide brief instructions here for starting up a 
-notebook server right on your own computer.  You should also note that this is the easiest way to obtain 
+<p>Luckily, Sage is just a free download away!  It is easiest to go to <a href="http://www.sagemath.org"
+target="_blank" class="external" title="Open external site in a new window">the Sage website</a> and
+follow instructions there for your system, but we also provide brief instructions here for starting up a
+notebook server right on your own computer.  You should also note that this is the easiest way to obtain
 <a href="Evaluate.html#CommandLine" class-"internal">command line</a> access to Sage.</p>
 
 <h4 id="Windows">Windows</h4>
 
-<p>On Windows, the current best option is through a virtual machine.  These instructions are from 
-the current README.txt.
+<p>On Windows, the current best option is through a virtual machine.  These instructions are from
+the current <a href="http://wiki.sagemath.org/SageApplianceInstallation">Sage Appliance installation instructions</a> and
+<a href="http://wiki.sagemath.org/SageAppliance">usage instructions</a>.
 <ul>
 <li>First, download <a href="http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads">VirtualBox</a>, a free
-virtual machine system.  Version 4 or later is required.</li>. 
-<li>Go to the <a href="http://www.sagemath.org">Sage website</a> and 
+virtual machine system.  Version 4 or later is required.</li>
+<li>Go to the <a href="http://www.sagemath.org/download-windows.html">Sage website</a> and
 download the file Sage-x.y.z.ova corresponding to the current version of Sage.</li>
-<li>Open VirtualBox, and import Sage by clicking 'File', then 'Import Appliance'.  FIXME: Screenshot?</li>
-<li>You choose a password, and can then use the notebook as you ordinarily would.</li>
+<li>Open VirtualBox, and import Sage by clicking 'File', then 'Import Appliance'.</li>
+<li>Power on the Sage appliance, and the notebook should start up.</li>
 </ul>
-There are <em>much</em> more detailed instructions in the README.txt located where the .ova file
-is downloaded, and we encourage reading them.</p>
+There are <em>many</em> screenshots and much more detailed information in the instruction links above,
+as well as the README.txt where the .ova file is downloaded; we encourage reading them.</p>
 
-<p>A more native Windows solution has been in the works for a long time, but we simply lack the manpower 
-to finish it off.  Sage welcomes volunteers!</p>
 
 <h4 id="Mac">Mac</h4>
 
 <p>On Mac, there is a native app that can be downloaded from the Sage website.  Here are a few useful
 tips.
 <ul>
-<li>The app will start up in the browser you have set (in Safari) as your default browser.  You can also
-choose to have none of those, and use a mini-browser included in the app.</li>
+<li>The app will start up in the browser you have set as your default browser (this preference is located in Safari's
+preferences).  You can also choose to have none of those, and use a mini-browser included in the app.</li>
 <li>A <em>very</em> useful tool is to have a menu item along the top of the screen for Sage, where you can
-start a command line or browser as you wish (as well as several more advanced items).  This makes it 
-very easy to start up a Sage session whenever you want.  FIXME: Screenshot</li>
-<li>FIXME: More?</li>
+start a command line or browser as you wish (as well as several more advanced items).  This makes it
+very easy to start up a Sage session whenever you want.  <img src="screenshots/MenuBar.png" /></li>
+<li>Naturally, you can also access the Sage program from the Terminal program if you wish.</li>
 </ul>
-We cannot currently double-click Sage worksheet files to open them in Sage, but this functionality is
-in the review process.</p>
+FIXME: The ability to double-click Sage worksheet files is coming in the near future.</p>
 
 <h4 id="Linux">Linux</h4>
 
-<p>There are binaries on the Sage page for most major Linux distributions.  If you don't find yours there, 
-it is not hard to download the source and compile it.</p>
-
-<p>FIXME: Make this more detailed</p>
+<p>There are binaries on the Sage page for most major Linux distributions.  If you don't find yours there,
+it is not hard to download the source and compile it.  Ask the Sage support list or at <a href="http://ask.sagemath.org/questions/">ask.sagemath.org</a>
+with any issues.  Sage also works on Solaris and FreeBSD.</p>
 
 <div class="footer">
 <p>Previous: <a href="Classroom.html" class="internal">How to Use Sage in the Classroom</a> | Up: <a href="index.html#Contents" class="internal">Contents</a> | Next: <a href="WhySage.html" class="internal">Why Sage?</a></p>
 Docs</a>. The advantage of this is that one can harness the whole power
 of Sage through any web browser.</p>
 
-<p>Since this article is itself online, we assume that you have access to some server running Sage - most 
-likely one of the ones hosted by the Sage team itself, such as <a href="http://www.sagenb.org" 
-target="_blank" class="external" title="Open external site in a new window">this one</a> or <a 
-href="http://demo.sagenb.org" target="_blank" class="external" title="Open external site in a new 
-window">this one</a>.  However, it is easy to use the same interface on an <a href="NextSteps.html#Offline" class="internal">offline 
+<p>Since this article is itself online, we assume that you have access to some server running Sage - most
+likely one of the ones hosted by the Sage team itself, such as <a href="http://www.sagenb.org"
+target="_blank" class="external" title="Open external site in a new window">this one</a> or <a
+href="http://demo.sagenb.org" target="_blank" class="external" title="Open external site in a new
+window">this one</a>.  However, it is easy to use the same interface on an <a href="NextSteps.html#Offline" class="internal">offline
 computer</a> once one has downloaded Sage for personal use.</p>
 
-FIXME: do we want the links above to have class="external" and so on?
-The offline computer link will need to link to the appropriate spot later in the article.
+<p>(If you want to simply try out Sage commands in a <a href="http://aleph.sagemath.org/">cell server</a>
+or to see what they look like first, just skip ahead to <a href="Mathematics.html">"Doing Mathematics with Sage"</a>.)</p>
 
 <p>Most of the time, a Sage user will simply evaluate commands of her own choosing; however, particularly in a situation with many users all needing the same content, one can also upload a worksheet directly to Sage or edit a previously "published" worksheet.</p>
 
 
 <p>No matter when you use Sage, if you intend to use it through a browser, then you'll have to log in!</p>
 
+FIXME: it seems pointless to update the screenshots, but should we at least mention that they should
+expect a newer version?
+
 <img src="screenshots/login_page_screenshot.png" />
 
-<p>If you have not created an account on the server you are browsing to, then you will want to 
-click on "Create a New Account".  This will take you to a page where you may use an arbitrary 
+<p>If you have not created an account on the server you are browsing to, then you will want to
+click on "Create a New Account".  This will take you to a page where you may use an arbitrary
 username, though use of the @ and . symbols are discouraged.</p>
 
 FIXME: Let's be a little more specific, or maybe just use the "official" one from the NB
 <img src="screenshots/notebook_home.png" />
 
 <p>Once you've logged in, you can simply click on "New Worksheet" to
-begin actually computing.</p> 
+begin actually computing.</p>
 <p>There will be a pop-up window suggesting you
 change the name from "Untitled", but that is up to you.  The worksheets are not tracked by name,
 so you can change the name at any time as is convenient or useful.</p>
 
 <h2 id="Upload">Uploading and Editing Worksheets</h2>
 
-<p>It is likely that a student using Sage in a course will not be motivated to learn Sage 
-syntax from scratch to do homework.  Instead, we will usually provide something predigested, so that 
+<p>It is likely that a student using Sage in a course will not be motivated to learn Sage
+syntax from scratch to do homework.  Instead, we will usually provide something predigested, so that
 the student focuses first on the mathematics.</p>
 
-<p>So it is often the case that one will want to use an existing worksheet.  By clicking 
-the "Upload Worksheet" link, one arrives at an interface with a few different 
-options.  Key here is that one can upload a worksheet on one's local computer <b>or</b> enter a URL for any worksheet available on the internet.  
-In fact, <a href="">here</a> is a specific URL to upload the worksheet with all examples from this article.</p>
+<p>So it is often the case that one will want to use an existing worksheet.  By clicking
+the "Upload Worksheet" link, one arrives at an interface with a few different
+options.  Key here is that one can upload a worksheet on one's local computer <b>or</b> enter a URL for any worksheet available on the internet.
+In fact, <a href="FIXME">here</a> is a specific URL to upload the worksheet with all examples from this article.</p>
 
 <img src="screenshots/upload_form.png" />
 
 <p>But many other programs are proprietary.  This particularly bothered the founder of Sage, William Stein,
 because it was actually quite plausible that a student of his might work on a research topic in
 computational number theory, but then not be able to afford the software it was implemented in.  Starting
-from scratch, he started a new program based on the Python language to glue together many other pieces.</p>
+from scratch, he started a new program based on the Python language; it was not long before he glued in
+interfaces to many other programs, in addition to his new code.</p>
 
 <p>Over the past several years, these pieces (including Maxima, GAP, Pari, MathJax, and many others)
-were added to many many thousands of lines of new code to provide a comprehensive system.   And it's
+were added to many, many thousands of lines of new code to provide a comprehensive system.   And it's
 a system that is licensed in such a way that improvements to it will always be fully available to the
-entire mathematical community, no matter how many resources one has.</p>
+entire mathematical community, no matter how many resources one has.  <a href="http://www.sagemath.org/development-ack.html">Funding
+support</a> has come from the NSF and other government agencies, Sun, Google, and Microsoft, as well as many
+private donors and local institutions who have supported educational or research workshops.</p>
 
 <p>This approach is also quite friendly to pedagogy, because we can actually point students to the underlying
 algorithms, to verify that it really is what the textbook says.  In many areas,
-it's also possible for them to directly contribute.</p>
+it's also possible for them to directly contribute.  <a href="http://wiki.sagemath.org/prep/2012">MAA PREP workshops</a>
+and other pedagogical events continue to proliferate.</p>
 
 <p>Though Sage's mission is to be a viable alternative to similar proprietary software, the developers do not
 see Sage as competing with other open-source alternatives; each project has a different type
 of the places mentioned in the section on <a href="Help.html" class="internal">help</a> are great places to ask.  For
 those who don't mind signing up for a developer account on <a href="http://trac.sagemath.org/sage_trac/">the Sage Trac</a>
 of bugs and enhancement requests, you can create a ticket there complete with details of what went wrong.</li>
+<li>Along similar lines, there is a new community <a href="http://interact.sagemath.org/">Sage interact database</a>
+as a place to share functionality snippets, and which provides a great opportunity for sharing ideas.</li>
 <li>Finally, for those who don't mind actually typing a little bit in the actual files or have some programming experience,
 there are three great ways to get involved - ask on the
 <a href="https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/sage-devel">Sage developer list</a> for details:
 
   <li><a href="Classroom.html" class="internal">How to Use Sage in the Classroom</a>
     <ul>
-      <li><a href="Classroom.html#Sharing" class="internal">Sharing and Publishing Sage Worksheets</a></li>
-      <li><a href="Classroom.html#Labs" class="internal">Lab Work</a>
-      <li><a href="Classroom.html#Sagelets" class="internal">Interactive Sagelets</a>
+        <li><a href="#Demos" class="internal">In-Class Demos</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#CheatSheet" class="internal">Cheat Sheets of Shortcuts</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Sharing" class="internal">Sharing Sage Worksheets</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#CellServer" class="internal">Sage Cell Server</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Labs" class="internal">Lab Work</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Research" class="internal">Research</a></li>
+        <li><a href="#Sagelets" class="internal">Interactive Sagelets</a></li>
     </ul>
   </li>
 
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