Source

gevent / greentest / test_support.py

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"""Supporting definitions for the Python regression tests."""

import sys

HOST = 'localhost'

class Error(Exception):
    """Base class for regression test exceptions."""

class TestFailed(Error):
    """Test failed."""

class TestSkipped(Error):
    """Test skipped.

    This can be raised to indicate that a test was deliberatly
    skipped, but not because a feature wasn't available.  For
    example, if some resource can't be used, such as the network
    appears to be unavailable, this should be raised instead of
    TestFailed.
    """

class ResourceDenied(TestSkipped):
    """Test skipped because it requested a disallowed resource.

    This is raised when a test calls requires() for a resource that
    has not be enabled.  It is used to distinguish between expected
    and unexpected skips.
    """

verbose = 1              # Flag set to 0 by regrtest.py
use_resources = None     # Flag set to [] by regrtest.py
max_memuse = 0           # Disable bigmem tests (they will still be run with
                         # small sizes, to make sure they work.)

# _original_stdout is meant to hold stdout at the time regrtest began.
# This may be "the real" stdout, or IDLE's emulation of stdout, or whatever.
# The point is to have some flavor of stdout the user can actually see.
_original_stdout = None
def record_original_stdout(stdout):
    global _original_stdout
    _original_stdout = stdout

def get_original_stdout():
    return _original_stdout or sys.stdout

def unload(name):
    try:
        del sys.modules[name]
    except KeyError:
        pass

def unlink(filename):
    import os
    try:
        os.unlink(filename)
    except OSError:
        pass

def forget(modname):
    '''"Forget" a module was ever imported by removing it from sys.modules and
    deleting any .pyc and .pyo files.'''
    unload(modname)
    import os
    for dirname in sys.path:
        unlink(os.path.join(dirname, modname + os.extsep + 'pyc'))
        # Deleting the .pyo file cannot be within the 'try' for the .pyc since
        # the chance exists that there is no .pyc (and thus the 'try' statement
        # is exited) but there is a .pyo file.
        unlink(os.path.join(dirname, modname + os.extsep + 'pyo'))

def is_resource_enabled(resource):
    """Test whether a resource is enabled.  Known resources are set by
    regrtest.py."""
    return use_resources is not None and resource in use_resources

def requires(resource, msg=None):
    """Raise ResourceDenied if the specified resource is not available.

    If the caller's module is __main__ then automatically return True.  The
    possibility of False being returned occurs when regrtest.py is executing."""
    # see if the caller's module is __main__ - if so, treat as if
    # the resource was set
    return
    if sys._getframe().f_back.f_globals.get("__name__") == "__main__":
        return
    if not is_resource_enabled(resource):
        if msg is None:
            msg = "Use of the `%s' resource not enabled" % resource
        raise ResourceDenied(msg)

import socket

def find_unused_port(family=socket.AF_INET, socktype=socket.SOCK_STREAM):
    """Returns an unused port that should be suitable for binding.  This is
    achieved by creating a temporary socket with the same family and type as
    the 'sock' parameter (default is AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM), and binding it to
    the specified host address (defaults to 0.0.0.0) with the port set to 0,
    eliciting an unused ephemeral port from the OS.  The temporary socket is
    then closed and deleted, and the ephemeral port is returned.

    Either this method or bind_port() should be used for any tests where a
    server socket needs to be bound to a particular port for the duration of
    the test.  Which one to use depends on whether the calling code is creating
    a python socket, or if an unused port needs to be provided in a constructor
    or passed to an external program (i.e. the -accept argument to openssl's
    s_server mode).  Always prefer bind_port() over find_unused_port() where
    possible.  Hard coded ports should *NEVER* be used.  As soon as a server
    socket is bound to a hard coded port, the ability to run multiple instances
    of the test simultaneously on the same host is compromised, which makes the
    test a ticking time bomb in a buildbot environment. On Unix buildbots, this
    may simply manifest as a failed test, which can be recovered from without
    intervention in most cases, but on Windows, the entire python process can
    completely and utterly wedge, requiring someone to log in to the buildbot
    and manually kill the affected process.

    (This is easy to reproduce on Windows, unfortunately, and can be traced to
    the SO_REUSEADDR socket option having different semantics on Windows versus
    Unix/Linux.  On Unix, you can't have two AF_INET SOCK_STREAM sockets bind,
    listen and then accept connections on identical host/ports.  An EADDRINUSE
    socket.error will be raised at some point (depending on the platform and
    the order bind and listen were called on each socket).

    However, on Windows, if SO_REUSEADDR is set on the sockets, no EADDRINUSE
    will ever be raised when attempting to bind two identical host/ports. When
    accept() is called on each socket, the second caller's process will steal
    the port from the first caller, leaving them both in an awkwardly wedged
    state where they'll no longer respond to any signals or graceful kills, and
    must be forcibly killed via OpenProcess()/TerminateProcess().

    The solution on Windows is to use the SO_EXCLUSIVEADDRUSE socket option
    instead of SO_REUSEADDR, which effectively affords the same semantics as
    SO_REUSEADDR on Unix.  Given the propensity of Unix developers in the Open
    Source world compared to Windows ones, this is a common mistake.  A quick
    look over OpenSSL's 0.9.8g source shows that they use SO_REUSEADDR when
    openssl.exe is called with the 's_server' option, for example. See
    http://bugs.python.org/issue2550 for more info.  The following site also
    has a very thorough description about the implications of both REUSEADDR
    and EXCLUSIVEADDRUSE on Windows:
    http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms740621(VS.85).aspx)

    XXX: although this approach is a vast improvement on previous attempts to
    elicit unused ports, it rests heavily on the assumption that the ephemeral
    port returned to us by the OS won't immediately be dished back out to some
    other process when we close and delete our temporary socket but before our
    calling code has a chance to bind the returned port.  We can deal with this
    issue if/when we come across it."""
    tempsock = socket.socket(family, socktype)
    port = bind_port(tempsock)
    tempsock.close()
    del tempsock
    return port

def bind_port(sock, host='', preferred_port=54321):
    """Try to bind the sock to a port.  If we are running multiple
    tests and we don't try multiple ports, the test can fails.  This
    makes the test more robust."""

    import socket, errno

    # Find some random ports that hopefully no one is listening on.
    # Ideally each test would clean up after itself and not continue listening
    # on any ports.  However, this isn't the case.  The last port (0) is
    # a stop-gap that asks the O/S to assign a port.  Whenever the warning
    # message below is printed, the test that is listening on the port should
    # be fixed to close the socket at the end of the test.
    # Another reason why we can't use a port is another process (possibly
    # another instance of the test suite) is using the same port.
    for port in [preferred_port, 9907, 10243, 32999, 0]:
        try:
            sock.bind((host, port))
            if port == 0:
                port = sock.getsockname()[1]
            return port
        except socket.error:
            if sys.exc_info()[1].args[0] != errno.EADDRINUSE:
                raise
            print >>sys.__stderr__, \
                '  WARNING: failed to listen on port %d, trying another' % port
    raise TestFailed('unable to find port to listen on')

FUZZ = 1e-6

def fcmp(x, y): # fuzzy comparison function
    if type(x) == type(0.0) or type(y) == type(0.0):
        try:
            x, y = coerce(x, y)
            fuzz = (abs(x) + abs(y)) * FUZZ
            if abs(x-y) <= fuzz:
                return 0
        except:
            pass
    elif type(x) == type(y) and type(x) in (type(()), type([])):
        for i in range(min(len(x), len(y))):
            outcome = fcmp(x[i], y[i])
            if outcome != 0:
                return outcome
        return cmp(len(x), len(y))
    return cmp(x, y)

try:
    unicode
    have_unicode = 1
except NameError:
    have_unicode = 0

is_jython = sys.platform.startswith('java')

import os
# Filename used for testing
if os.name == 'java':
    # Jython disallows @ in module names
    TESTFN = '$test'
elif os.name == 'riscos':
    TESTFN = 'testfile'
else:
    TESTFN = '@test'
    # Unicode name only used if TEST_FN_ENCODING exists for the platform.
    if have_unicode:
        # Assuming sys.getfilesystemencoding()!=sys.getdefaultencoding()
        # TESTFN_UNICODE is a filename that can be encoded using the
        # file system encoding, but *not* with the default (ascii) encoding
        if isinstance('', unicode):
            # python -U
            # XXX perhaps unicode() should accept Unicode strings?
            TESTFN_UNICODE = "@test-\xe0\xf2"
        else:
            # 2 latin characters.
            TESTFN_UNICODE = unicode("@test-\xe0\xf2", "latin-1")
        TESTFN_ENCODING = sys.getfilesystemencoding()
        # TESTFN_UNICODE_UNENCODEABLE is a filename that should *not* be
        # able to be encoded by *either* the default or filesystem encoding.
        # This test really only makes sense on Windows NT platforms
        # which have special Unicode support in posixmodule.
        if (not hasattr(sys, "getwindowsversion") or
                sys.getwindowsversion()[3] < 2): #  0=win32s or 1=9x/ME
            TESTFN_UNICODE_UNENCODEABLE = None
        else:
            # Japanese characters (I think - from bug 846133)
            TESTFN_UNICODE_UNENCODEABLE = eval('u"@test-\u5171\u6709\u3055\u308c\u308b"')
            try:
                # XXX - Note - should be using TESTFN_ENCODING here - but for
                # Windows, "mbcs" currently always operates as if in
                # errors=ignore' mode - hence we get '?' characters rather than
                # the exception.  'Latin1' operates as we expect - ie, fails.
                # See [ 850997 ] mbcs encoding ignores errors
                TESTFN_UNICODE_UNENCODEABLE.encode("Latin1")
            except UnicodeEncodeError:
                pass
            else:
                sys.stderr.write('WARNING: The filename %r CAN be encoded by the filesystem.  '
                'Unicode filename tests may not be effective'
                % TESTFN_UNICODE_UNENCODEABLE)

# Make sure we can write to TESTFN, try in /tmp if we can't
fp = None
try:
    fp = open(TESTFN, 'w+')
except IOError:
    TMP_TESTFN = os.path.join('/tmp', TESTFN)
    try:
        fp = open(TMP_TESTFN, 'w+')
        TESTFN = TMP_TESTFN
        del TMP_TESTFN
    except IOError:
        print ('WARNING: tests will fail, unable to write to: %s or %s' %
                (TESTFN, TMP_TESTFN))
if fp is not None:
    fp.close()
    unlink(TESTFN)
del os, fp

def findfile(file, here=__file__):
    """Try to find a file on sys.path and the working directory.  If it is not
    found the argument passed to the function is returned (this does not
    necessarily signal failure; could still be the legitimate path)."""
    import os
    if os.path.isabs(file):
        return file
    path = sys.path
    path = [os.path.dirname(here)] + path
    for dn in path:
        fn = os.path.join(dn, file)
        if os.path.exists(fn): return fn
    return file

def verify(condition, reason='test failed'):
    """Verify that condition is true. If not, raise TestFailed.

       The optional argument reason can be given to provide
       a better error text.
    """

    if not condition:
        raise TestFailed(reason)

def vereq(a, b):
    """Raise TestFailed if a == b is false.

    This is better than verify(a == b) because, in case of failure, the
    error message incorporates repr(a) and repr(b) so you can see the
    inputs.

    Note that "not (a == b)" isn't necessarily the same as "a != b"; the
    former is tested.
    """

    if not (a == b):
        raise TestFailed("%r == %r" % (a, b))

def sortdict(dict):
    "Like repr(dict), but in sorted order."
    items = dict.items()
    items.sort()
    reprpairs = ["%r: %r" % pair for pair in items]
    withcommas = ", ".join(reprpairs)
    return "{%s}" % withcommas

def check_syntax(statement):
    try:
        compile(statement, '<string>', 'exec')
    except SyntaxError:
        pass
    else:
        print ('Missing SyntaxError: "%s"' % statement)

def open_urlresource(url):
    import urllib, urlparse
    import os.path

    filename = urlparse.urlparse(url)[2].split('/')[-1] # '/': it's URL!

    for path in [os.path.curdir, os.path.pardir]:
        fn = os.path.join(path, filename)
        if os.path.exists(fn):
            return open(fn)

    requires('urlfetch')
    print >> get_original_stdout(), '\tfetching %s ...' % url
    fn, _ = urllib.urlretrieve(url, filename)
    return open(fn)

#=======================================================================
# Decorator for running a function in a different locale, correctly resetting
# it afterwards.

def run_with_locale(catstr, *locales):
    def decorator(func):
        def inner(*args, **kwds):
            try:
                import locale
                category = getattr(locale, catstr)
                orig_locale = locale.setlocale(category)
            except AttributeError:
                # if the test author gives us an invalid category string
                raise
            except:
                # cannot retrieve original locale, so do nothing
                locale = orig_locale = None
            else:
                for loc in locales:
                    try:
                        locale.setlocale(category, loc)
                        break
                    except:
                        pass

            # now run the function, resetting the locale on exceptions
            try:
                return func(*args, **kwds)
            finally:
                if locale and orig_locale:
                    locale.setlocale(category, orig_locale)
        inner.func_name = func.func_name
        inner.__doc__ = func.__doc__
        return inner
    return decorator

#=======================================================================
# Big-memory-test support. Separate from 'resources' because memory use should be configurable.

# Some handy shorthands. Note that these are used for byte-limits as well
# as size-limits, in the various bigmem tests
_1M = 1024*1024
_1G = 1024 * _1M
_2G = 2 * _1G

# Hack to get at the maximum value an internal index can take.
class _Dummy:
    def __getslice__(self, i, j):
        return j
try:
    MAX_Py_ssize_t = _Dummy()[:]
except TypeError:
    MAX_Py_ssize_t = sys.maxsize

def set_memlimit(limit):
    import re
    global max_memuse
    sizes = {
        'k': 1024,
        'm': _1M,
        'g': _1G,
        't': 1024*_1G,
    }
    m = re.match(r'(\d+(\.\d+)?) (K|M|G|T)b?$', limit,
                 re.IGNORECASE | re.VERBOSE)
    if m is None:
        raise ValueError('Invalid memory limit %r' % (limit,))
    memlimit = int(float(m.group(1)) * sizes[m.group(3).lower()])
    if memlimit > MAX_Py_ssize_t:
        memlimit = MAX_Py_ssize_t
    if memlimit < _2G - 1:
        raise ValueError('Memory limit %r too low to be useful' % (limit,))
    max_memuse = memlimit

def bigmemtest(minsize, memuse, overhead=5*_1M):
    """Decorator for bigmem tests.

    'minsize' is the minimum useful size for the test (in arbitrary,
    test-interpreted units.) 'memuse' is the number of 'bytes per size' for
    the test, or a good estimate of it. 'overhead' specifies fixed overhead,
    independant of the testsize, and defaults to 5Mb.

    The decorator tries to guess a good value for 'size' and passes it to
    the decorated test function. If minsize * memuse is more than the
    allowed memory use (as defined by max_memuse), the test is skipped.
    Otherwise, minsize is adjusted upward to use up to max_memuse.
    """
    def decorator(f):
        def wrapper(self):
            if not max_memuse:
                # If max_memuse is 0 (the default),
                # we still want to run the tests with size set to a few kb,
                # to make sure they work. We still want to avoid using
                # too much memory, though, but we do that noisily.
                maxsize = 5147
                self.failIf(maxsize * memuse + overhead > 20 * _1M)
            else:
                maxsize = int((max_memuse - overhead) / memuse)
                if maxsize < minsize:
                    # Really ought to print 'test skipped' or something
                    if verbose:
                        sys.stderr.write("Skipping %s because of memory "
                                         "constraint\n" % (f.__name__,))
                    return
                # Try to keep some breathing room in memory use
                maxsize = max(maxsize - 50 * _1M, minsize)
            return f(self, maxsize)
        wrapper.minsize = minsize
        wrapper.memuse = memuse
        wrapper.overhead = overhead
        return wrapper
    return decorator

def bigaddrspacetest(f):
    """Decorator for tests that fill the address space."""
    def wrapper(self):
        if max_memuse < MAX_Py_ssize_t:
            if verbose:
                sys.stderr.write("Skipping %s because of memory "
                                 "constraint\n" % (f.__name__,))
        else:
            return f(self)
    return wrapper

#=======================================================================
# Preliminary PyUNIT integration.

import unittest


class BasicTestRunner:
    def run(self, test):
        result = unittest.TestResult()
        test(result)
        return result


def run_suite(suite, testclass=None):
    """Run tests from a unittest.TestSuite-derived class."""
    if verbose:
        runner = unittest.TextTestRunner(sys.stdout, verbosity=2)
    else:
        runner = BasicTestRunner()

    result = runner.run(suite)
    if not result.wasSuccessful():
        if len(result.errors) == 1 and not result.failures:
            err = result.errors[0][1]
        elif len(result.failures) == 1 and not result.errors:
            err = result.failures[0][1]
        else:
            if testclass is None:
                msg = "errors occurred; run in verbose mode for details"
            else:
                msg = "errors occurred in %s.%s" \
                      % (testclass.__module__, testclass.__name__)
            raise TestFailed(msg)
        raise TestFailed(err)


def run_unittest(*classes):
    """Run tests from unittest.TestCase-derived classes."""
    suite = unittest.TestSuite()
    for cls in classes:
        if isinstance(cls, (unittest.TestSuite, unittest.TestCase)):
            suite.addTest(cls)
        else:
            suite.addTest(unittest.makeSuite(cls))
    if len(classes)==1:
        testclass = classes[0]
    else:
        testclass = None
    run_suite(suite, testclass)


#=======================================================================
# doctest driver.

def run_doctest(module, verbosity=None):
    """Run doctest on the given module.  Return (#failures, #tests).

    If optional argument verbosity is not specified (or is None), pass
    test_support's belief about verbosity on to doctest.  Else doctest's
    usual behavior is used (it searches sys.argv for -v).
    """

    import doctest

    if verbosity is None:
        verbosity = verbose
    else:
        verbosity = None

    # Direct doctest output (normally just errors) to real stdout; doctest
    # output shouldn't be compared by regrtest.
    save_stdout = sys.stdout
    sys.stdout = get_original_stdout()
    try:
        f, t = doctest.testmod(module, verbose=verbosity)
        if f:
            raise TestFailed("%d of %d doctests failed" % (f, t))
    finally:
        sys.stdout = save_stdout
    if verbose:
        print ('doctest (%s) ... %d tests with zero failures' % (module.__name__, t))
    return f, t

#=======================================================================
# Threading support to prevent reporting refleaks when running regrtest.py -R

def threading_setup():
    import threading
    return len(threading._active), len(threading._limbo)

def threading_cleanup(num_active, num_limbo):
    import threading
    import time

    _MAX_COUNT = 10
    count = 0
    while len(threading._active) != num_active and count < _MAX_COUNT:
        print (threading._active)
        count += 1
        time.sleep(0.1)

    count = 0
    while len(threading._limbo) != num_limbo and count < _MAX_COUNT:
        print (threading._limbo)
        count += 1
        time.sleep(0.1)

def reap_children():
    """Use this function at the end of test_main() whenever sub-processes
    are started.  This will help ensure that no extra children (zombies)
    stick around to hog resources and create problems when looking
    for refleaks.
    """

    # Reap all our dead child processes so we don't leave zombies around.
    # These hog resources and might be causing some of the buildbots to die.
    import os
    if hasattr(os, 'waitpid'):
        any_process = -1
        while True:
            try:
                # This will raise an exception on Windows.  That's ok.
                pid, status = os.waitpid(any_process, os.WNOHANG)
                if pid == 0:
                    break
            except:
                break