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# Old Games and Other Code ## What this is This repo is a collection of old games and code I wrote in junior high and high school. This was back in the days of DOS and command line. It was a simpler time. It was a better time. This was back before internet access was a common thing. We got QBasic for free with our MS-DOS and we were grateful because you couldn't just go out and download a compiler. If we were lucky, we found development tools on a 5 1/4" floppy in the shareware collection at bookstores. You kids probably don't even know what a bookstore is, what with the Amazons and the tablets and the smartphones these days. ## What you'll need * None of this will run under Windows, so you'll need [DOSBox](http://www.dosbox.com/). * **BAS** files are QBasic programs. You can use [Basic2DOSBox](http://www.qbasic.net/en/qbasic-downloads/DOS/Windows-Solutions.htm) to install QBasic on DOSBox. * **ASI** files are ASIC programs. ASIC is/was a Shareware BASIC compiler. I found a copy [here](http://publish.uwo.ca/~jkiernan/asicinfo.htm). ## What's actually here ### Space Fighter / Supership (1993) **Supership** is a shoot 'em up. It's probably one of my earliest attempts at a real action game. It was not a succesful attempt. Hit detection is way off and there's zero feedback. However, you can purchase new weapons after each level with the points you score, which I find pretty impressive looking back at it. ### Bouncer (1996) **Bouncer** is a collection of demo apps that are variants of an ASCII smiley face bouncing around the screen like a Pong ball. Extended ASCII characters are what we had back in the day, back before emoji were a thing. There were less than 200 of them and most of those were just normal alphabetical characters with accents and umlauts *and we were thankful to even have that*. ### Game Pack (1996) **Game Pack** is actually a collection of three games: **Hovercraft A-225X** (I think I liked weird acronyms as a kid), **Bounce Paddles**, and **Slots**. Hovercraft is another shooter that is not good at being a shooter. You basically have to pick flying objects out of the sky before they pass you, and your laser is an instant-fire, so it's insanely easy. Bounce Paddles is Pong. Slots is barely a game, because there's not even any score. I think it's mainly an attempt to play with animation (as shown by the painfully long win/"close" animations, which can be turned off). I think this was an attempt to emulate what I'd seen in a lot of shareware games. Mainly a serious attempt at ASCII art, but also flirting with the idea that I might be able to package and sell these games at some point. (Spoiler alert: that never happened.) FSDraw and FSPic were utility applications that would create and display image files (which were just collections of X and Y coordinates and their associated colors). ### The Great Labyrinth (1996) **The Great Labyrinth** was an attempt to emulate RPGs like *Dragon Warrior*, *The Bard's Tale*, and *The Legend of Zelda*. It's not a good game per se, but by the same token, I am impressed young me decided to scope down the RPG concept to something he (I?) could manage to finish. Battles play out automatically. There's a set number of weapons, armor, and keys in the pre-defined labyrinth. Your main choices are where to go and whether to open chests (which may contain food, traps, or monsters). There was no experience or gold; you simply regained HP based on the strength of the monster. It had a really crappy story that I've chosen to redact in this release. Basically, your kingdom gets ransacked and so you decide to go hunting for a treasure that you can sell to return it to its former prosperity. This was in the heady days before *The Phantom Menace* and I hadn't yet learned that economics does not make for a good fantasy plot. In retrospect, it'd make a pretty good mobile game, stripping down the old-school RPG experience to a few meaningful choices. FSDraw and FSPic were utility applications that would create and display image files (which were just collections of X and Y coordinates and their associated colors). ### Noteman (1996) **Noteman** is a crappy Pac-Man clone. FSDraw and FSPic were utility applications that would create and display image files (which were just collections of X and Y coordinates and their associated colors). ### Snag-A-Box (1996) **Snag-A-Box** was an attempt to create a single-screen arcade platformer like *Joust* or *Mario Bros.*. It's also one of the few cases where I used actual graphics in ASIC rather than ASCII art. (I'd done this more in QBasic, which had better support for such things.) The premise is, you have to navigate a series of platforms to collect treasure chests with your rope, avoiding rolling balls that will bowl you over. Screen wrapping was essential. It's not a great game, but it works. You'll also find my art style has not greatly changed from what it was here.