Source

holyspiritwebster.org / pagesV3 / qanda-2.htm

Full commit
  1
  2
  3
  4
  5
  6
  7
  8
  9
 10
 11
 12
 13
 14
 15
 16
 17
 18
 19
 20
 21
 22
 23
 24
 25
 26
 27
 28
 29
 30
 31
 32
 33
 34
 35
 36
 37
 38
 39
 40
 41
 42
 43
 44
 45
 46
 47
 48
 49
 50
 51
 52
 53
 54
 55
 56
 57
 58
 59
 60
 61
 62
 63
 64
 65
 66
 67
 68
 69
 70
 71
 72
 73
 74
 75
 76
 77
 78
 79
 80
 81
 82
 83
 84
 85
 86
 87
 88
 89
 90
 91
 92
 93
 94
 95
 96
 97
 98
 99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
325
326
327
328
329
330
331
332
333
334
335
336
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
351
352
353
354
355
356
357
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
379
380
381
382
383
384
385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
407
408
409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
418
419
420
421
422
423
424
425
426
427
428
429
430
431
432
433
434
435
436
437
438
439
440
441
442
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456
457
458
459
460
461
462
463
464
465
466
467
468
469
470
471
472
473
474
475
476
477
478
479
480
481
482
483
484
485
486
487
488
489
490
491
492
493
494
495
496
497
498
499
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
507
508
509
510
511
512
513
514
515
516
517
518
519
520
521
522
523
524
525
526
527
528
529
530
531
532
533
534
535
536
537
538
539
540
541
542
543
544
545
 
<!DOCTYPE html
  PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html lang="en-us" xml:lang="en-us"><!-- #BeginTemplate "/Templates/SiteVersion3.dwt" -->
<head>
<!-- #BeginEditable "doctitle" --> 
<title>Questions and Answers</title>
<META NAME="description" CONTENT="Church of the Holy Spirit web site,a Roman Catholic Church located in Webster NY USA that is a welcoming  parish to frendship and fellowship following our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ">
<META NAME="keywords" CONTENT="Catholic, Holy Spirit, Webster, Parish, Church, home page, catholic, church, worship,God, parish, Webster, webster, penfield,Penfield, pastor, Mass Masses, adoration,rochester,Rochester, religion ">
<!-- #EndEditable -->
<META NAME="description" CONTENT="Church of the Holy Spirit web site,a Roman Catholic Church located in Webster NY USA that is a welcoming  parish to frendship and fellowship following our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ">
<META NAME="keywords" CONTENT="Catholic, Holy Spirit, Webster, Parish, Church, home page, catholic, church, worship,God, parish, Webster, webster, penfield,Penfield, pastor, Mass Masses, adoration,rochester,Rochester, religion ">

<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>
<meta name="copyright" content="(C) Copyright 2009"/>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="CACHE-CONTROL" CONTENT="PUBLIC">
<meta name="security" content="public"/>
<meta name="Robots" content="index,follow "/>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="CONTENT-LANGUAGE" CONTENT="en-US">
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Style-Type" CONTENT="text/css">
<meta http-equiv="PICS-Label" content='(PICS-1.1 "http://www.icra.org/ratingsv02.html" l gen true r (cz 1 lz 1 nz 1 oz 1 vz 1) "http://www.rsac.org/ratingsv01.html" l gen true r (n 0 s 0 v 0 l 0) "http://www.classify.org/safesurf/" l gen true r (SS~~000 1))' />
<meta name="no-email-collection" value="http://www.unspam.com/noemailcollection/"/>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<link rel="stylesheet" href="../css/navTop.css">
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../css/stylesheet.css">
<!--[if gte IE 5.5]>
<script language="JavaScript" src="../js/NEED.js" type="text/JavaScript"></script>
<![endif]-->
<script language="JavaScript" src="../js/scrollingBox.js" type="text/JavaScript"></script>
<script language="JavaScript">
<!--
function MM_reloadPage(init) {  //reloads the window if Nav4 resized
  if (init==true) with (navigator) {if ((appName=="Netscape")&&(parseInt(appVersion)==4)) {
    document.MM_pgW=innerWidth; document.MM_pgH=innerHeight; onresize=MM_reloadPage; }}
  else if (innerWidth!=document.MM_pgW || innerHeight!=document.MM_pgH) location.reload();
}
MM_reloadPage(true);
// -->
</script>
</head>
<body background="../images/siteStructure/gradients/PgBkgrnd.red.gold.jpg">
<table width="841" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" height="169">
  <tr>
    <td height="158" background="../images/siteStructure/gradients/Lin5x200.red.gold.png" width="841" > 
      <div align="center"> <img src="../images/siteStructure/banner.png" width="477" height="144"></div>
</table>
	
	
<table align="center" width="841" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" height="0" >
  <tr>
    <td bgcolor="#FFFFF0" height="3"> 
      <ul id="navmenu">
        <li><a href="../index.html">Home</a></li>
        <li><a href="qanda-2.htm#">Parish Information</a> 
          <ul>
            <li><a href="http://www.holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/address.htm">Address</a></li>
            <li><a href="http://www.holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/gen_info.htm">General 
              Information</a></li>
            <li><a href="http://www.holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/contacts.htm">Parish 
              Contacts</a></li>
            <li><a href="http://www.holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/worship.htm">Mass-Adoration 
              </a></li>
            <li><a href="http://www.holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/treasures1.htm">Parish 
              Treasures </a></li>
          </ul>
        <li><a href="qanda-2.htm#">Links</a> 
          <ul >
            <li><a href="http://www.holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/links.htm#Leadership">Catholic 
              Leadership</a></li>
            <li><a href="http://www.holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/links.htm#photos">Photo 
              Gallery</a></li>
            <li><a href="http://www.holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/links.htm#Local">Local 
              Area Links</a></li>
            <li><a href="http://www.holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/links.htm#WPCC">WPCC 
              Organizations</a></li>
            <li><a href="http://www.holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/links.htm#Youth">Youth 
              Links</a></li>
            <li><a href="http://www.holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/links.htm#Natural">Natural 
              Family Planning</a></li>
            <li><a href="http://www.holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/links.htm#General">General 
              Catholic Links</a></li>
          </ul>
        </li>
        <li><a href="qanda-2.htm#">Ministries</a> 
          <ul>
            <li><a href="Ministries.htm">Overview 
              </a></li>
            <li><a href="ministry/pastoral.htm">Pastoral 
              / Sacramental</a></li>
            <li><a href="ministry/leadership.htm">Parish 
              Leadership</a></li>
			<li><a href="health.htm">WPCC Health Ministry 
              </a></li>
            <li><a href="nfp.htm">Natural 
              Family Plan</a></li>
            <li><a href="ministry/LITURGY.htm"> 
              Liturgy</a></li>
            <li><a href="http://holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/ministry/FINANCE.htm"> 
              Finance</a></li>
            <li><a href="ministry/FACILITIES.htm"> 
              Facilities</a></li>
            <li><a href="ministry/SOCIAL.htm"> 
              Social Ministry</a></li>
            <li><a href="ministry/EVANGELIZATION.htm"> 
              Evangelization</a></li>
            <li><a href="ministry/SOCIAL.EVENTS.htm">Social 
              Events</a></li>
            <li><a href="ministry/STEWARDSHIP.htm">Stewardship</a></li>
            <li><a href="ministry/COMMUNICATIONS.htm">Communications</a></li>
          </ul>
        </li>
        <li><a href="qanda-2.htm#">Parish News</a> 
          <ul>
            <li><a href="bulletin.htm">Parish 
              Bulletin</a></li>
            <li><a href="news/events.htm">Parish 
              Activities </a></li>
            <li><a href="news/community-outreach.htm"> 
              Outreach Ministries</a></li>
            <li><a href="news/community-news.html">Community 
              News </a></li>
            <li><a href="news/faith.htm">Faith 
              Formation </a></li>
          </ul>
        </li>
		<!-- 
         <li><a href="#">Parish Council</a> 
		  <ul>
            <li><a href="http://holyspiritwebster.org/Suggestions.html">Submit 
              Comments</a></li>
            <li><a href="http://holyspiritwebster.org/pagesV3/parish.council.htm">Meeting 
              Minutes</a></li>
          </ul>
        </li>
		-->
		<li><a href="qanda-2.htm#">Liturgy Q and A</a> 
		  <ul>
            <li><a href="qanda-1.htm">Q and 
              A pg1</a> </li>
          </ul>
		
			<li><a href="qanda-2.htm#">Stewardship</a> 
		  <ul>
            <li><a href="parish-stewardship.htm">Parish</a> 
            </li>
            <li><a href="focus-areas.htm">Focus 
              Areas</a> </li>
          </ul>

		
		
        <li><a href="qanda-2.htm#">Vocations</a> 
          <ul class="link-style-2" style="left: -3px; top: 19px">
            <li><a href="vocations.htm">Diocesan 
              priest</a> 
          </ul>
      </ul>
        </td>
        </tr>
</table>

<!-- #BeginEditable "E1" --> 
<table id="table13" style="font-size: 10pt;" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="841" height="2604">
  <tr bgcolor="#FFFFF0"> 
    <td valign="top" colspan="3" height="4" > 
      <div align="center"> 
        <script language="JavaScript1.1" type="text/javascript" src="../js/gday.js"></script>
      </div>
    </td>
  </tr>
  <tbody> 
  <tr> 
    <td valign="top" width="12" height="652" bgcolor="#FFFFF0" > 
      <p class="stdTextBlack"><span class="smallTitle"><br>
        </span></p>
    </td>
    <td valign="top" width="404" height="652" > 
      <p>&nbsp;</p>
      <h3 align="left" class="txt-brown-sm"><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">Pope</span><a name="Pope"></a> 
        Leo XIII in his 1891 encyclical, Rerum Novarum (On the Condition of Labor), 
        articulated Catholic social justice teachings, while addressing the plight 
        of immigrants. Church leaders since that time have continued to expand 
        and refine these justice principles. These teachings should dominate the 
        thought patterns and actions of all Catholics.<br>
        Basic biblical attitudes and perspectives teach us to treat immigrants 
        with respect, care and concern. Hospitality to strangers (Leviticus 19:33-34), 
        to the very least of our brothers and sisters, is one of the criteria 
        upon which our own final judgment will be based (Matthew 25:31-46). Jesus 
        himself experienced life as a stranger in a foreign land when he had to 
        flee the death threats of Herod (Matthew 2:13-15).<br>
        These and other biblical justice principles provide the foundational Catholic 
        response to negative attitudes toward undocumented immigrants. Catholics 
        need to affirm that all have a right to emigrate to provide for themselves 
        and their families. God has given us much, not to hoard for ourselves, 
        but to share with all. While each country has a right to regulate its 
        borders and control immigration, that right has to be exercised with justice 
        and always tempered by mercy.<br>
        Catholic Bishops have made justice for immigrants one of the priorities 
        of the Church in the United States. Visit the web site www.justiceforimmigrants.org/ 
        and reflect on how well biblical principles inform your attitude toward 
        immigrants.<br>
        &copy;2007 Liturgical Publications Inc, New Berlin, WI 5315 </h3>
      <h3 align="left" class="stdTextBlack"><span class="txt-brown-sm"><a name="Thomas"></a></span><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">ThomasMore</span><span class="txt-brown-sm">, 
        chancellor of England during the reign of Henry VIII (1509-1547) was eventually 
        killed for remaining faithful to his beliefs and values. Unfortunately 
        for Thomas, these convictions went against the king's desires and dictates. 
        As Thomas More was led to his death, he offered his king and longtime 
        friend these words of conviction and right action: &quot;I die the king's 
        good servant, but God's first.&quot;<br>
        Thomas More, who worked in law and government, knew the value and necessity 
        of good government for the sake of the common good. He worked diligently 
        to make certain that government was just and fair. Political activity 
        and policies had to be guided by faith-values and beliefs, and not merely 
        by the law of the land. Thomas worked at consistently making the laws 
        of the land reflect the laws of God. When the two conflicted, Thomas was 
        clear concerning his choice to value his beliefs in God over his life.<br>
        As we try to discern the various issues that face us this election year, 
        let us be as clear as Thomas was in the choices that need to be made. 
        On abortion, on the death penalty, on immigration, on poverty, on unemployment, 
        on war, on any act of injustice, we must work to have our laws reflect 
        our beliefs and values.<br>
        What choice would you make if confronted with the same dilemma that Thomas 
        More and John Fisher faced?<br>
        &copy;2008 Liturgical Publications Inc, New Berlin, WI 53151</span></h3>
      <h3 align="left" class="stdTextBlack"><span class="txt-brown-sm"><a name="Both_feasts"></a></span><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">Both 
        feasts</span><span class="txt-brown-sm"> highlight the sacrifices that 
        people are willing to make in order to be faithful to their values and 
        beliefs. Peter, Paul and the first martyrs all died during the first persecution 
        of Christians under the Emperor Nero, between the years 64 and 68.<br>
        The Roman historian Tacitus tells of a great fire that broke out in Rome 
        in July of 64. It lasted ten days, during which almost two-thirds of the 
        city was ruined. Many suspected Nero started the fire. To remove any suspicion, 
        Nero blamed the Christians. Persecutions ensued and many Christians were 
        killed during the entertainments near the Vatican Hill stadium. Peter, 
        Paul and many of the early Christians died during this persecution.<br>
        Since Paul was a Roman citizen, he could not be killed like the others. 
        Rather, he was taken to the Ostian Way and beheaded. Legend tells that 
        Peter and Paul met on their way to their respective places of death, a 
        moment beautifully captured in many icons. They embrace, both anxious 
        concerning their fates, yet at peace knowing that they have &quot;fought 
        the good fight, have won the race, and that a crown of victory awaits 
        them&quot; (cf. 2 Timothy 4:7). Major churches now tower over the traditional 
        sites of their martyrdom.<br>
        How do you maintain fidelity and faith when bombarded with situations 
        in today's world that challenge your beliefs?<br>
        &copy;2007 Liturgical Publications Inc, New Berlin, WI 53151<br>
        </span></h3>
      <h3 align="left" class="stdTextBlack"><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">As 
        Catholic<a name="Catholic"></a> Christians</span><span class="txt-brown-sm"> 
        our baptismal call challenges us to make real Jesus' mission and ministry 
        of establishing the reign of God on earth. Christians are committed to 
        transforming the world, continually making sure that justice, human dignity, 
        respect, and rights prevail. Politically active Christians work toward 
        insuring that justice pervades legislation and political activity.<br>
        The US Catholic bishops have reminded Catholics of their moral obligation 
        to activate their political responsibility. Catholics are challenged to 
        select candidates that uphold values that will bring about the reign of 
        God on earth. In documents such as Faithful Citizenship, the bishops offer 
        guidelines aiding all Christians toward selecting candidates who would 
        be consonant with Christian values.<br>
        Recently, among Catholics disagreements have arisen concerning which Christian 
        values should take priority. Some feel that pro-life issues such as abortion 
        and embryonic stem cell research, along with homosexuality and gay marriage 
        are so significant that they ought to dominate the decision-making process. 
        Others feel that poverty, war, the death penalty, unemployment and immigration 
        are the significant issues that need to be weighed in any voting decision.<br>
        Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship, approved by the bishops 
        in November, 2007, is based on the seven key themes of Catholic social 
        teaching that should guide every Catholic voter. You can download and 
        read the document at www.usccb.org/faithfulcitizenship/.<br>
        In what ways does your faith help you discern which candidate to support 
        this election year?<br>
        &copy;2007 Liturgical Publications Inc, New Berlin, WI 53151</span></h3>
      <h3 align="left" class="stdTextBlack"><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">Letters</span><span class="txt-brown-sm"><a name="Letters"></a> 
        make up the bulk of New Testament books. Twenty-one of the twenty-seven 
        books are letters from various people, most of them from Paul or his followers. 
        Letters were an easy and common way of communicating in the ancient world, 
        as they are today. Some letters are more formal than others.<br>
        The second Lectionary reading of each Sunday proclaims the letters in 
        a somewhat continuous fashion. Each of the three Lectionary years exposes 
        us to selections from different letters, allowing us to enter into the 
        world of the early followers of Jesus. One soon realizes that even though 
        the specifics may be different, the human emotions, struggles and questions 
        concerning what it means to follow Jesus are perennial.<br>
        In Cycle A of the Lectionary, we only read from four of the letters during 
        Ordinary Time: the beginning of 1 Corinthians, Romans, Philippians, and 
        1 Thessalonians. Hebrews and James, along with the other letters from 
        Paul, are read in Ordinary Time in Cycles B and C. The themes explored 
        in the letters from Peter and John are especially apropos to the Easter 
        season and so we read from those letters in the cycles of that season.<br>
        This Sunday pay close attention to the second reading. Locate that letter 
        in the Bible. Reflect on what that letter is saying to you about what 
        following Jesus entails.<br>
        &copy;2007 Liturgical Publication</span></h3>
      <h3 align="left" class="stdTextBlack"><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">Tisha<a name="Tisha"></a> 
        B'Av</span><span class="txt-brown-sm"> literally means the ninth day of 
        the month of Av, which usually occurs during August. It is a day of mourning 
        focused on the destruction of the first and second temples.<br>
        The first temple built by Solomon around 950 BC was destroyed in 586 BC 
        by the Babylonians, who exiled the Hebrew people to Babylonia. In 536, 
        upon their return, the people rebuilt the temple, which was later expanded 
        and beautified by Herod the Great. That second temple, the one in which 
        Jesus taught, was destroyed by the Romans in 70 AD.<br>
        Along with mourning the destruction of the temple, Jews also mourn other 
        tragedies that legend claims to have coincidentally taken place on the 
        ninth of Av. One great tragedy concerns the persecution and expulsion 
        of Jews from Spain in 1492.<br>
        Tisha B'Av, like Yom Kippur, is a twenty-four-hour period of fasting with 
        a variety of restrictions typically associated with mourning, such as 
        no laughter, no activities that give pleasure and enjoyment, no washing 
        or bathing, no sexual relations, and not even reading Torah. The synagogue 
        service includes readings from the book of Lamentations and prayers of 
        mourning.<br>
        How does ritualizing grief and mourning help us deal with the tragedies 
        of life in a healthier and more faith-filled manner? What Christian rituals 
        of mourning have been most beneficial to you?<br>
        &copy;2007 Liturgical Publications Inc, New Berlin, WI 53151</span></h3>
      <p class="blackHeading2"><span class="txt-brown-sm"><a name="Pius"></a></span><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">Pope 
        PiusX</span><span class="txt-brown-sm">, pope from 1903-1914, had a great 
        love and devotion to the Eucharist and desired to promote it. Over the 
        years many influences had entered the Catholic world, particularly the 
        attitude that one was not worthy to receive communion. This led many Catholics 
        to refrain from receiving, even on Sundays. Pius X saw this as a distortion 
        of the way Catholics should approach the Eucharist and worked towards 
        changing that attitude.<br>
        In 1903, Pius X issued several decrees strongly encouraging all faithful 
        to receive frequently, even daily. In 1910, he lowered the age for receiving 
        first communion from the teenage years to the age of reason, understood 
        to be seven years of age. Now accepted as a common practice, early reception 
        of the Eucharist was a rather radical position to promote during his day.<br>
        Pius X also worked diligently to promote and encourage daily Bible reading 
        among Catholics. He established the Pontifical Biblical Commission, still 
        in existence, to promote Bible study and to oversee all matters biblical. 
        Restoring Gregorian chant, codifying church law, and encouraging a pastoral 
        sensitivity to people were other trademarks of his pontificate.<br>
        Pius X shunned Vatican pomp and circumstance, wishing to serve the Lord 
        in simplicity. He once observed that &quot;I was born poor, I have lived 
        poor, and I wish to die poor.&quot;<br>
        Reflect on the role that Eucharist plays in your life.<br>
        &copy;2007 Liturgical Publications Inc, New Berlin, WI 53151</span></p>
      </td>
    <td valign="top" width="425" height="652" > 
      <h3 align="left" class="stdTextBlack">&nbsp;</h3>
      <h3 align="left" class="stdTextBlack"><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">Typically</span><span class="txt-brown-sm"><a name="Typically"></a> 
        we associate the veneration of the cross with Good Friday. Today's feast 
        dates back to the discovery in Jerusalem of what was believed to be the 
        true cross by Constantine's mother, Helena, on September 14, 320. For 
        Christians the cross symbolizes Jesus' complete and total love for all 
        humanity.<br>
        The second reading from Philippians (which we also hear on Palm Sunday) 
        proclaims that Jesus did not grasp on to his divinity but rather emptied 
        himself, becoming obedient and attentive to God's will. It was Jesus' 
        faithful living according to God's intentions that ultimately led to his 
        death. Yet, God affirms his Son by raising him up and showing him as the 
        savior of all humanity.<br>
        The first reading from the book of Numbers offers the healing and life-giving 
        sign of a serpent mounted on a pole. The serpent, a source of death, is 
        transformed by God's grace into a source of healing and new life for the 
        bitten and poisoned Israelites. The early church writers saw this event 
        as a prefiguring of the cross.<br>
        John's Gospel takes up this sign and applies it to Jesus who was also 
        raised up on a pole, the wooden cross. Through his willingness to be raised 
        up in death, Jesus becomes, through God's transforming grace, the ultimate 
        source of healing and life for all of humanity.<br>
        Reflect on what meaning the cross has for you in your faith life. Do you 
        have a cross in an important place in your home?<br>
        &copy;2008 Liturgical Publications Inc, New Berlin, WI 53151</span></h3>
      <h3 align="left" class="stdTextBlack"><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">The 
        hymn<a name="hymn"></a></span><span class="txt-brown-sm"> in Philippians, 
        chapter 2 is usually referred to as the kenotic hymn. Kenotic is Greek 
        for self-emptying, since this well-known hymn speaks of Jesus letting 
        go of divinity, and emptying himself to take on a human nature human. 
        Paul encourages all to be of the same mind. Jesus' self-emptying becomes 
        a model for all humans to imitate, because this movement addresses humanity's 
        main struggle.<br>
        Genesis 3 recounts the outcome of the temptation that all people experience. 
        The serpent tempts Adam and Eve to eat of the fruit because in doing so, 
        they will be like God. The desire of humans to be in charge, in control, 
        and to dominate others by grasping on to power is a strong temptation, 
        difficult to overcome. Paul believes that such a path is ultimately self-destructive, 
        because it violates what God originally created us for, namely communion 
        with God, united with others.<br>
        How do we achieve this community that God intended for all humanity? Paul's 
        answer lies in the attitude of Christ. He did not grasp on to divinity 
        but rather let go of it to show us what it means to be fully human. Being 
        human involves the acceptance that we are created by God, conforming ourselves 
        to what God intends and desires of us. This obedience to God's ways is 
        what brings about God's reign.<br>
        &copy;2008 Liturgical Publications Inc, New Berlin, WI 53151</span></h3>
      <h3 align="left" class="stdTextBlack"><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">Matthew<a name="Matthew"></a>'s 
        Gospel</span><span class="txt-brown-sm"> has been used to justify hatred 
        of Jews, centered primarily on the charge of deicide, the killing of God 
        (Jesus). Matthew 27:25 quotes the Jewish mob agitating for Jesus' crucifixion 
        as saying, &quot;His blood be upon us and upon our children.&quot; Taken 
        out of historical context, the verse has caused untold bloodshed of Jews 
        by Christians. So is Matthew's Gospel anti-Jewish?<br>
        Matthew is a Jew writing for a primarily Jewish community that has accepted 
        Jesus as the Messiah. It is struggling for existence within a Pharisaic-dominated 
        Judaism that has chosen not to accept Jesus as Messiah. Matthew's community 
        seems to be persecuted by other Jews for believing in Jesus as Messiah 
        and legitimate Torah-interpreter. Matthew assures his community that it 
        is on the right track in accepting Jesus. The Gospel is written as a defense 
        of those Jews who accept Jesus, in response to the criticism of fellow 
        Jews who do not. The defense gets heated (Matthew 23) as charges of hypocrisy, 
        false pride and legal wrangling are leveled against primarily Pharisaic 
        Jews who reject Jesus as Messiah.<br>
        The historical context situates these intense arguments among Jews who 
        disagreed over the significance of Jesus. Distinctions between Jew and 
        Christian have yet to occur. This is Jewish in-house disagreement and 
        tension. Only when taken out of their historical context can these words 
        be mistaken as anti-Jewish. Matthew's Gospel is not anti-Jewish in any 
        sense, although it has been interpreted to be so for centuries. Reflect 
        on how we can develop better understanding between Christians and Jews.<br>
        &copy;2008 Liturgical Publications Inc, New Berlin, WI 53151</span></h3>
      <h3 align="left" class="stdTextBlack"><span class="txt-brown-sm"><a name="Today"></a></span><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">Today's 
        first reading</span><span class="txt-brown-sm"> from Exodus challenges 
        all Christians to &quot;not molest or oppress an alien, for you were once 
        aliens yourselves in the land of Egypt.&quot; In the Gospel reading, Jesus 
        responds to the query concerning which of the Lord's commandments is the 
        greatest. Jesus quotes both Deuteronomy 6:5 and Leviticus 19:18-love the 
        Lord your God with all your being, and your neighbor as yourself.<br>
        Jesus states that the second commandment is like the first. In so doing, 
        Jesus reveals that loving God entails the love of neighbor. The final 
        judgment scene in Matthew 25 has Jesus equate love for the least of the 
        brothers and sisters with love for God. Jesus' ministry shows that when 
        we love and care for all, especially those in need, we are loving God 
        with all of our being.<br>
        These Scripture passages can guide our response to the immigration issue 
        that we face as a nation. In the Gospel, Jesus declares that the whole 
        law and the prophets depend on these two commandments that are really 
        one. As a nation we have a right to secure our borders and have an immigration 
        policy. But both policies have to be just, fair, and humane.<br>
        If Jesus were among us, what policies would he establish? How would he 
        deal with undocumented people? Jesus is our answer. What is your answer?<br>
        &copy;2008 Liturgical Publications Inc, New Berlin, WI 53151</span></h3>
      <h3 align="left" class="stdTextBlack"><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">Every<a name="Every"></a> 
        diocese</span><span class="txt-brown-sm"> has a mother church, the bishop&#146;s 
        cathedral where the diocesan church gathers and celebrates. The cathedral 
        is the seat of the bishop&#146;s authority over the diocese. That authority 
        is intended to be one of service to God&#146;s people, shepherding and 
        guiding them in a truly pastoral mode.<br>
        The pope is first and foremost the bishop of Rome, as well as the head 
        of the Roman Catholic Church. St. John Lateran is his cathedral, and ist 
        prominence derives from that reality. The basilica of St. Peter is not 
        the cathedral of Rome, despite the fact that the Pope uses St. Peter&#146;s 
        as his base of operations.<br>
        St. John Lateran cathedral traces its origins to Constantine who converted 
        a portion of the Laterani family palace into a church, and gave it to 
        Pope Sylvester, (314-335), as the papal church and residence. It became 
        known as the cathedral of the pope, and its fa&ccedil;ade&#146;s inscription 
        refers to it as &#147;the Mother and Head of all Churches, in the City 
        and of the World.&#148; The universal celebration of this feast stresses 
        the unity among Roman Catholics, as they unite themselves with the Chair 
        of Peter.<br>
        The Lateran portion of the name refers to the family who donated the land, 
        St. John refers to the two saints in whose honor the church is dedicated, 
        John the Baptist and John the Evangelist. Make an effort sometime soon 
        to visit your diocesan cathedral and pray for all bishops that they continue 
        to be true shepherds of God&#146;s people.<br>
        &copy;2006 Liturgical Publications Inc, New Berlin, WI 53151</span></h3>
      <h3 align="left" class="stdTextBlack"><span class="txt-brown-sm"><a name="This"></a></span><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">This 
        feast </span><span class="txt-brown-sm">celebrates an event that appears 
        nowhere in the New Testament, but is recounted in the apocryphal gospel, 
        the Protevangelium of James. This gospel, along with others, was never 
        accepted by the early Christian communities as inspired by God. However, 
        its details and events captured the imagination and fed the devotional 
        life of the early Christians.<br>
        The gospel tells of Mary's parents, Joachim and Anne, desiring a child, 
        but unable to have one. Both pray to God, promising that if they were 
        granted a child, they would dedicate the child exclusively to God. God 
        grants them a girl, whom they name Mary. At three years of age, Mary is 
        taken to the temple in Jerusalem and there presented to the Lord. There 
        she grows up in holiness and devotion to God, until the time comes for 
        her to be married.<br>
        <br>
        The feast was first celebrated in the Eastern Church, which continues 
        the devotion to this day. Devotion in the Western Church was begun by 
        a French knight who, returning from the Crusades pressed for its celebration. 
        Several popes promoted it and in 1585, Pope Sixtus V placed the feast 
        on the universal calendar. The Presentation was a popular subject for 
        many great painters and artists.<br>
        <br>
        The feast celebrates Mary's great devotion and dedication to God. Take 
        Mary as your model as you strive to dedicate your life to God.<br>
        &copy;2008 Liturgical Publications Inc, New Berlin, WI 53151</span></h3>
      <h3 align="left" class="stdTextBlack"><span class="txt-brown-lg-bold">Matthew</span><span class="txt-brown-sm"><a name="Matthew"></a> 
        25:31-46 depicts a final judgment scene in which all nations are gathered. 
        Does this include Jews and Christians, or is the parable referring to 
        non-believers who are neither Christian nor Jew? A good argument can be 
        made that such is the case. If so, the parable addresses an issue that 
        is still prevalent today-namely, how can non-believers be saved?<br>
        Matthew's Gospel delineates a conflict occurring between those who accept 
        Jesus as Messiah and savior and those who don't. For Matthew, Jesus is 
        Immanuel, God-with-us, who has promised that whenever two or three are 
        gathered in his name, he is there in their midst. At the end of the Gospel, 
        Jesus proclaims that he will be with his followers till the end of time; 
        but the question does surface concerning the fate of those who are not 
        believers or followers of Jesus.<br>
        Matthew recounts this final judgment scene to address that very question. 
        The nations are judged based on how they treated the believers or followers 
        of Jesus, the least of the brothers and sisters. If they took care of 
        Jesus' followers' needs, then they are judged righteous and worthy of 
        salvation. If they did not, then they are cursed. If this is the criteria 
        for non-believers, how much more so should it be the criteria among believers 
        themselves as well? Obviously believers and non-believers alike are subject 
        to the same judgment.<br>
        Reflect on how you measure up against such criteria for final judgment.<br>
        &copy;2008 Liturgical Publications Inc, New Berlin, WI 53151</span></h3>
          </td>
  </tr>
  </tbody> 
</table>
<!-- End of StatCounter Code -->
 
<div id="Layer1" style="position:absolute; left:401px; top:330px; width:326px; height:153px; z-index:1"></div>
<!-- #EndEditable --> 

<table width="843" border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" height="46">
  <tr>
    <td background="../images/siteStructure/gradients/Lin900x8.red.gold.png" width="838" height="30"> 
      <div align="center"> 
	    <div class="footer"> <b class="txt-black-sm-bold">Copyright 2005-2010 
          Church of the Holy Spirit, ( Roman Catholic Diocese of Rochester )<br>
          1355 Hatch Road, Webster, NY 14580 - Phone: (585) 671-5520 </b></div>
      </div>
    </td>
  </tr>
<!-- Start of StatCounter Code -->
<script type="text/javascript">
var sc_project=4418681; 
var sc_invisible=1; 
var sc_partition=55; 
var sc_click_stat=1; 
var sc_security="1d33f943"; 
</script>

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://www.statcounter.com/counter/counter.js"></script><noscript><div class="statcounter"><a title="myspace visitors " href="http://www.statcounter.com/myspace/" target="_blank"><img class="statcounter" src="http://c.statcounter.com/4418681/0/1d33f943/1/" alt="myspace visitors " ></a></div></noscript>
<!-- End of StatCounter Code -->
</table>


<!-- End of StatCounter Code -->

</body>
<!-- #EndTemplate --></html>