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Edoardo Batini  committed 17565b6

Capablanca-CF: sections 4 and 5.

credits to Vasanthakannan

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  • Parent commits 7964b5d

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File wsgi/static/pgn/capablanca-cf/chapter1/example11.pgn

+[Event "?"]
+[Site "?"]
+[Date "2012.07.16"]
+[Round "?"]
+[White "New game"]
+[Black "?"]
+[Result "*"]
+[Annotator ",vasanth"]
+[SetUp "1"]
+[FEN "5rk1/1b3p1p/ppq3p1/2p5/8/1P1P1R1Q/PBP3PP/7K b - - 0 1"]
+[PlyCount "6"]
+
+ 1... Re8 2. Qxh7+ Kxh7 3. Rh3+ Kg8 4. Rh8# *
+

File wsgi/static/pgn/capablanca-cf/chapter1/example12.pgn

+[Event "?"]
+[Site "?"]
+[Date "????.??.??"]
+[Round "?"]
+[White "?"]
+[Black "?"]
+[Result "*"]
+[SetUp "1"]
+[FEN "5rk1/1bq1bp1p/p1n3p1/1p6/3N4/1P1PR2Q/PBP3PP/6K1 w - - 0 1"]
+[PlyCount "7"]
+
+1. Nxc6 Bg5 {Black cannot take the Knight because White
+threatens mate by Qxh7+ followed by Rh3+.} 2. Ne7+ Qxe7 ({Again if} 2... Bxe7
+3. Qxh7+ Kxh7 4. Rh3+ Kg8 5. Rh8#) 3. Rxe7 Bxe7 4. Qd7 {and White wins one of
+the two Bishops, remains with a Queen and a Bishop against a Rook and Bishop, and should
+therefore win easily.} *
+

File wsgi/static/pgn/capablanca-cf/chapter1/example13.pgn

+[Event "?"]
+[Site "?"]
+[Date "????.??.??"]
+[Round "?"]
+[White "New game"]
+[Black "?"]
+[Result "*"]
+[SetUp "1"]
+[FEN "2q2rk1/1b3ppp/pp6/2p5/2P1N3/PP1Q4/1B3PPP/6K1 w - - 0 0"]
+[PlyCount "5"]
+
+1. Nf6+ gxf6 {Forced, otherwise Q X h7 mates} 2. Qg3+ Kh8 3. Bxf6# *
+

File wsgi/static/pgn/capablanca-cf/chapter1/example14.pgn

+[Event "?"]
+[Site "?"]
+[Date "????.??.??"]
+[Round "?"]
+[White "New game"]
+[Black "?"]
+[Result "*"]
+[SetUp "1"]
+[FEN "2q1rrk1/1bpn1ppp/pp1p4/1B6/4N3/1P1QR3/PBP2PPP/6K1 w - - 0 1"]
+[PlyCount "7"]
+
+1. Bxd7 Qxd7 ({If} 1... Bxe4 2. Qc3 {threatens mate, and therefore wins the
+Queen, which is already attacked.}) 2. Nf6+ gxf6 3. Rg3+ Kh8 4. Bxf6# *
+

File wsgi/static/pgn/capablanca-cf/chapter1/example15.pgn

+[Event "?"]
+[Site "?"]
+[Date "????.??.??"]
+[Round "?"]
+[White "New game"]
+[Black "?"]
+[Result "*"]
+[SetUp "1"]
+[FEN "r3qrk1/1pp2ppp/p1np4/3Q4/8/P2B1N2/1PP2PPP/3R2K1 w - - 0 1"]
+[PlyCount "5"]
+
+1. Bxh7+ Kxh7 ({If} 1... Kh8 2. Qh5 g6 3. Qh6 {and wins}) 2. Qh5+ Kg8 3. Ng5
+{and Black cannot stop mate at h7 except by sacrificing the Queen by Qe4 which
+would leave White with a Queen for a Rook.} *
+

File wsgi/static/pgn/capablanca-cf/chapter1/example16.pgn

+[Event "?"]
+[Site "?"]
+[Date "????.??.??"]
+[Round "?"]
+[White "New game"]
+[Black "?"]
+[Result "*"]
+[SetUp "1"]
+[FEN "2nb1rk1/1pqrnppp/p2p4/2pQ1N2/6P1/1P1B1N1P/P3RP2/3R2K1 w - - 0 1"]
+[PlyCount "19"]
+
+1. Nxe7+ {(this clears the line for the Bishop)} Bxe7 {(to stop the Knight from
+moving to g5 after the sacrifice of the Bishop)}
+2. Rxe7 Nxe7 3. Bxh7+ Kxh7 (3... Kh8 4. Qh5 g6 5. Bxg6+ Kg7 6. Qh7+ Kf6 7. g5+
+Ke6 8. Bxf7+ Rxf7 9. Qe4#) 4. Qh5+ Kg8 5. Ng5 Rc8 6. Qh7+ Kf8 7. Qh8+ Ng8 8.
+Nh7+ Ke7 9. Re1+ Kd8 10. Qxg8# *
+

File wsgi/templates/capablanca-cf-base.html

                                 <h5>Table of Contents</h5>
                                 <li><a class="chapter" href="#">Chapter I. First Principles: Endings, Middle-game and Openings</a>
                                     <ul class="sectionList">
-                                        <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/some_simple_mates.html">1. Some Simple Mates</a></li>
-                                        <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/pawn_promotion.html">2. Pawn Promotion</a></li>
-                                        <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/pawn_endings.html">3. Pawn Endings</a></li>
+                                        <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/some_simple_mates.html">
+                                            1. Some Simple Mates</a>
+                                        </li>
+                                        <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/pawn_promotion.html">
+                                            2. Pawn Promotion</a>
+                                        </li>
+                                        <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/pawn_endings.html">
+                                            3. Pawn Endings</a>
+                                        </li>
+                                        <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/some_winning_positions.html">
+                                            4.  Some Winning Positions in the Middle-Game</a>
+                                        </li>
+                                        <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/relative_value_pieces.html">
+                                            5. Relative Value of the Pieces</a>
+                                        </li>
                                     </ul>
                                 </li>
                                 <li><a class="chapter" href="#">Chapter II. Further Principles in End-Game Play</a>

File wsgi/templates/capablanca-cf/chapter1/relative_value_pieces.html

+{% extends "capablanca-cf-base.html" %}
+{% block title %}
+5. Relative value of the pieces
+{% endblock %}
+
+{% block content %}
+<h1>5. Relative value of the pieces</h1>
+
+<p>
+    Before going on to the general principles of the openings, it is advisable
+    to give the student an idea of the proper relative value of the pieces.
+    There is no complete and accurate table for all of them, and the only thing
+    to do is to compare the pieces separately.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+    For all general theoretical purposes the Bishop and the Knight have to be
+    considered as of the same value, though it is my opinion that the Bishop
+    will prove the more valuable piece in most cases; and it is well known that
+    two Bishops are almost always better than two Knights.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+    The Bishop will be stronger against Pawns than the Knight, and in
+    combination with Pawns will also be stronger against the Rook than the
+    Knight will be.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+    A Bishop and a Rook are also stronger than a Knight and a Rook, but a Queen
+    and a Knight may be stronger than a Queen and a Bishop.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+    A Bishop will often be worth more than three Pawns, but a Knight very
+    seldom so, and may even not be worth so much.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+    A Rook will be worth a Knight and two Pawns, or a Bishop and two Pawns,
+    but, as said before, the Bishop will be a better piece against the Rook.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+    Two Rooks are slightly stronger than a Queen. They are slightly weaker than
+    two Knights and a Bishop, and a little more so than two Bishops and a
+    Knight. The power of the Knight decreases as the pieces are changed off.
+    The power of the Rook, on the contrary, increases.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+    The King, a purely <em>defensive</em> piece throughout the middle-game,
+    becomes an <em>offensive</em> piece once all the pieces are off the board,
+    and sometimes even when there are one or two minor pieces left. The
+    handling of the King becomes of paramount importance once the end-game
+    stage is reached.
+</p>
+
+{% endblock %}

File wsgi/templates/capablanca-cf/chapter1/some_winning_positions.html

+{% extends "capablanca-cf-base.html" %}
+{% block title %}
+4. Some winning positions in the middle-game
+{% endblock %}
+
+{% block content %}
+<h1>4. Some winning positions in the middle-game</h1>
+
+<p>By the time the student has digested all that has been previously
+explained, he, no doubt, is anxious to get to the actual game and play with
+all the pieces. However, before considering the openings, we shall devote a
+little time to some combinations that often arise during the game, and which
+will give the reader some idea of the beauty of the game, once he becomes
+better acquainted with it.</p>
+
+<h3>Example 11. </h3>
+
+<p>It is Black's move, and thinking that White merely threatens to play Qh6
+and to mate at g7, Black plays 1 ... Re8, threatening mate by way of Re1.
+White now uncovers his real and most effective threat, viz.:</p>
+
+{{ game.pgn("example11", "chapter1", "capablanca-cf") }}
+
+<p>This same type of combination may come as the result of a somewhat more
+complicated position.</p>
+
+<h3>Example 12. </h3>
+
+<p>White is a piece behind, and unless he can win it back quickly he will
+lose; he therefore plays:</p>
+
+{{ game.pgn("example12", "chapter1", "capablanca-cf") }}
+
+<p>These two examples show the danger of advancing the "g" Pawn one square,
+after having Castled on that side.</p>
+
+<h3>Example 13. </h3>
+
+<p>This is another very interesting type of combination. Black has a Rook for
+a Knight and should therefore win, unless White is able to obtain some
+compensation immediately. White, in fact, mates in a few moves thus:</p>
+
+{{ game.pgn("example13", "chapter1", "capablanca-cf") }}
+
+<h3>Example 14. </h3>
+
+<p>The same type of combination occurs in a more complicated form in the
+following position.</p>
+
+{{ game.pgn("example14", "chapter1", "capablanca-cf") }}
+
+<h3>Example 15. </h3>
+
+<p>A very frequent type of combination is shown in the following position.</p>
+
+<p>Here White is the exchange and a Pawn behind, but he can win quickly thus:</p>
+
+{{ game.pgn("example15", "chapter1", "capablanca-cf") }}
+
+<h3>Example 16. </h3>
+
+<p>This same type of combination is seen in a more complicated form in the
+following position.</p>
+
+<p>White proceeds as follows:</p>
+
+{{ game.pgn("example16", "chapter1", "capablanca-cf") }}
+
+<p>This combination is rather long and has many variations, therefore a
+beginner will hardly be able to fathom it; but, knowing the type of
+combination, he might under similar circumstances undertake and carry out a
+brilliant attack which he would otherwise never think of.</p>
+
+<p>It will be seen that all the combinations shown have for a
+foundation the proper co-ordination of the pieces, which have all been brought
+to bear against a weak point.</p>
+
+{% endblock %}