Commits

Edoardo Batini  committed 711fb6f

Add three sections of chapter IV

  • Participants
  • Parent commits baed166

Comments (0)

Files changed (7)

File wsgi/static/pgn/capablanca-cf/chapter4/example50.pgn

+[Event "?"]
+[Site "Buenos Aires"]
+[Date "1911.05.26"]
+[Round "?"]
+[White "Capablanca"]
+[Black "Molina Carranza"]
+[Result "*"]
+[EventCountry "ARG"]
+[SetUp "1"]
+[FEN "r1bq1rk1/pp2nppp/4p3/2n5/8/2NBPN2/PP3PPP/R2Q1RK1 w - - 0 12"]
+
+12.Bxh7+ Kxh7 13.Ng5+ Kg6 14.Qg4 f5
+    (14...e5 {would have been immediately fatal. Thus:} 15.Ne6+ Kf6 16.f4! e4
+    17.Qg5+ Kxe6 18.Qe5+ Kd7 19.Rfd1+ Nd3 20.Nxe4 Kc6
+        ( {If}20...Ke8 21.Nd6+ {wins the Queen.})
+    21.Rxd3 Qxd3 22.Rc1+ Kb6
+        (22...Kd7 {mate in two.})
+    23.Qc7+ {and mate in five moves.})
+15.Qg3 Kh6 16.Qh4+ Kg6 17.Qh7+ Kf6
+    ( {If}17...Kxg5 18.Qxg7+ {and mate in a few moves.})
+18.e4 Ng6 19.exf5 exf5 20.Rad1 Nd3 21.Qh3 Ndf4 22.Qg3 Qc7 23.Rfe1 Ne2+
+{This blunder loses at once, but the game could not be saved in any case;}
+    ( {e.g.}23...Be6 24.Rxe6+ Nxe6 25.Nd5# )
+24.Rxe2 Qxg3 25.Nh7+ Kf7 26.hxg3 Rh8 27.Ng5+ Kf6 28.f4 {and Black resigns.} *
+

File wsgi/static/pgn/capablanca-cf/chapter4/example51.pgn

+[Event "?"]
+[Site "Sankt Petersburg"]
+[Date "1914.05.01"]
+[Round "?"]
+[White "Capablanca"]
+[Black "Bernstein"]
+[Result "*"]
+[EventCountry "RUS"]
+[SetUp "1"]
+[FEN "r1bq1k1r/b5pp/1nRN4/4p3/1P2P1n1/5NB1/P4PPP/3Q1RK1 w - - 0 21"]
+
+21.Bh4 Qd7 22.Nxc8 Qxc6 23.Qd8+ Qe8
+    ( {If}23...Kf7 24.Nd6+ {and mate next move.})
+24.Be7+ Kf7 25.Nd6+ Kg6 26.Nh4+ Kh5
+    (26...Kh6 27.Ndf5+ Kh5 28.Nxg7+ Kh6 29.Nhf5+ Kg6 30.Qd6+
+    {and mate next move.})
+27.Nxe8 Rxd8 28.Nxg7+ Kh6 29.Ngf5+ Kh5 30.h3! {The climax of the combination
+started with 21 Bh4. White is still threatening mate, and the best way to avoid
+it is for Black to give back all the material he has gained and to remain three
+Pawns behind.} *
+

File wsgi/static/pgn/capablanca-cf/chapter4/example52.pgn

+[Event "?"]
+[Site "?"]
+[Date "????.??.??"]
+[Round "?"]
+[White "Capablanca"]
+[Black "Blanco"]
+[Result "1-0"]
+[ECO "C10"]
+[Opening "French Defence"]
+
+1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.Nc3 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Nf3 Ngf6 6.Nxf6+ Nxf6 7.Ne5 {This move
+was first shown to me by the talented Venezuelan amateur, M. Ayala. The object
+is to prevent the development of Black's Queen's Bishop via b7, after ... b6,
+which is Black's usual development in this variation. Generally it is bad to
+move the same piece twice in an opening before the other pieces are out, and
+the violation of that principle is the only objection that can be made to this
+move, which otherwise has everything to recommend it.} 7...Bd6 8.Qf3
+    (8.Bg5 {might be better. The text move gives Black an opportunity of which
+he does not avail himself.})
+8...c6
+    (8...c5 {was the right move. It would have led to complications, in which
+Black might have held his own; at least, White's play would be very difficult.
+The text move accomplishes nothing, and puts Black in an  altogether defensive
+position. The veiled threat ... Bxe5 followed by ... Qa5+ is easily met.})
+9.c3 O-O 10.Bg5 Be7 {The fact that Black has now to move his Bishop back
+clearly demonstrates that Black's plan of development is faulty. He has lost
+too much time, and White brings his pieces into their most attacking position
+without hindrance of any sort.} 11.Bd3 Ne8
+    ( {The alternative was}11...Nd5 {Otherwise White would play} 12.Qh3
+    {and Black would be forced to play} 12...g6
+    {seriously weakening his King's side.}
+        ( {not}12...h6 {because of the sacrifice} 13.Bxh6 )
+    )
+12.Qh3 f5 {White has no longer an attack, but he has compelled Black to create
+a marked weakness. Now White's whole plan will be to exploit this weakness (the
+weak pawn at e6), and the student can now see how the principles expounded
+previously are applied in this game. Every move is directed to make the weak
+King's Pawn untenable, or to profit by the inactivity of the Black pieces
+defending the Pawn, in order to improve the position of White at other points.}
+13.Bxe7 Qxe7 14.O-O Rf6 15.Rfe1 Nd6 16.Re2 Bd7 {At last the Bishop comes out,
+not as an active attacking piece, but merely to make way for the Rook.} 17.Rae1
+Re8 18.c4 Nf7 {A very clever move, tending to prevent c5, and tempting White to
+play Nxd7, followed by Bxf5, which would be bad, as the following variation
+shows.
+But it always happens in such cases that, if one line of attack is
+anticipated, there is another; and this is no exception to the rule, as will be
+seen.} 19.d5!
+    (19.Nxd7 Qxd7 20.Bxf5 Ng5 21.Qg4 Rxf5 22.h4 h5 23.Qxf5 exf5 24.Rxe8+ Kh7
+    25.hxg5 Qxd4 )
+19...Nxe5 {Apparently the best way to meet the manifold threats of White.}
+    (19...cxd5 {would make matters worse, as the White Bishop would finally
+bear on the weak e6 Pawn via c4.})
+20.Rxe5 g6 21.Qh4 Kg7 22.Qd4 c5
+{Forced, as White threatened dxe6, and also Qxa7.} 23.Qc3 b6
+    (23...Qd6 {was better. But Black wants to tempt White to play dxe6,
+thinking that he will soon after regain his Pawn with a safe position. Such,
+however, is not the case, as White quickly demonstrates. I must add that in any
+case Black's position is, in my opinion, untenable, since all his pieces are
+tied up for the defence of a Pawn, while White's pieces are free to act.})
+24.dxe6 Bc8 25.Be2! {The deciding and timely manoeuvre. All the Black pieces
+are useless after this Bishop reaches d5.} 25...Bxe6 26.Bf3 Kf7 27.Bd5 Qd6 {Now
+it is evident that all the Black pieces are tied up, and it only remains for
+White to find the quickest way to force the issue. White will now try to place
+his Queen at h6, and then advance the "h" Pawn to h5 in order to break up the
+Black Pawns defending the King.} 28.Qe3 Re7
+    ( {If}28...f4 29.Qh3 h5 30.Qh4 Re7 31.Qg5 Kg7 32.h4 Qd7 33.g3 fxg3 34.f4
+    {and Black will soon be helpless, as he has to mark time with his pieces
+while White prepares to advance h5, and finally at the proper time to play
+Rxe6, winning.})
+29.Qh6 Kg8 30.h4 a6 31.h5 f4 32.hxg6 hxg6 33.Rxe6 {and Black resigns.} 1-0
+

File wsgi/templates/capablanca-cf-base.html

                             <ul id="mainNav" class="nice hide-on-phones">
                                 <h5>Table of Contents</h5>
                                 <li><a class="chapter" href="#">Chapter I. First Principles: Endings, Middle-game and Openings</a>
-                                <ul class="sectionList">
-                                    <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/some_simple_mates.html">1. Some Simple Mates</a></li>
-                                    <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/pawn_promotion.html">2. Pawn Promotion</a></li>
-                                    <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/pawn_endings.html">3. Pawn Endings</a></li>
-                                </ul>
+                                    <ul class="sectionList">
+                                        <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/some_simple_mates.html">1. Some Simple Mates</a></li>
+                                        <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/pawn_promotion.html">2. Pawn Promotion</a></li>
+                                        <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter1/pawn_endings.html">3. Pawn Endings</a></li>
+                                    </ul>
                                 </li>
                                 <li><a class="chapter" href="#">Chapter II. Further Principles in End-Game Play</a>
-                                <ul class="sectionList">
-                                </ul>
+                                    <ul class="sectionList">
+                                    </ul>
                                 </li>
                                 <li><a class="chapter" href="#">Chapter III. Planning a Win in the Middle-Game Play</a>
-                                <ul class="sectionList">
-                                <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter3/attacking_without_knights.html">
-                                    17. Attacking without the aid of the knights</a>
-                                </li>
-                                <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter3/attacking_with_knights.html">
-                                    18. Attacking with knights as a prominent force</a>
-                                </li>
-                                <li><a
-                                    href="/capablanca-cf/chapter3/winning_indirect_attack.html">
-                                    19. Winning by indirect attack</a>
-                                </li>
-                                </ul>
+                                    <ul class="sectionList">
+                                        <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter3/attacking_without_knights.html">
+                                            17. Attacking without the aid of the knights</a>
+                                        </li>
+                                        <li><a href="/capablanca-cf/chapter3/attacking_with_knights.html">
+                                            18. Attacking with knights as a prominent force</a>
+                                        </li>
+                                        <li><a
+                                            href="/capablanca-cf/chapter3/winning_indirect_attack.html">
+                                            19. Winning by indirect attack</a>
+                                        </li>
+                                    </ul>
                                 </li>
                                 <li><a class="chapter" href="#">Chapter IV. General Theory</a>
                                     <ul class="sectionList">
+                                        <li><a
+                                            href="/capablanca-cf/chapter4/the_initiative.html">
+                                            20. The initiative</a>
+                                        </li>
+                                        <li><a
+                                            href="/capablanca-cf/chapter4/direct_attacks_en_masse.html">
+                                            21. Direct attacks "en masse"</a>
+                                        </li>
+                                        <li><a
+                                            href="/capablanca-cf/chapter4/force_threatened_attack.html">
+                                            22. The force of the threatened attack</a>
+                                        </li>
                                     </ul>
                                 </li>
                                 <li><a class="chapter" href="#">Chapter V. End-Game Strategy</a>

File wsgi/templates/capablanca-cf/chapter4/direct_attacks_en_masse.html

+{% extends "capablanca-cf-base.html" %}
+{% block title %}
+21. Direct attacks "en masse"
+{% endblock %}
+
+{% block content %}
+<h1>21. Direct attacks "en masse"</h1>
+
+<p>In the first case the attack must be carried on with sufficient force to
+guarantee its success. Under no consideration must a direct attack against the
+King be carried on <em>à outrance</em> unless there is absolute certainty in
+one's own mind that it will succeed, since failure in such cases means
+disaster.</p>
+
+<h3>Example 50. </h3>
+
+<p>A good example of a successful direct attack against the King is shown in
+the following diagram.</p>
+
+<p>In this position White could simply play Bc2 and still have the better
+position, but instead he prefers an immediate attack on the King's side, with
+the certainty in his mind that the attack will lead to a win.  (We give, from
+now on, games and notes, so that the student may familiarise himself with the
+many and varied considerations that constantly are borne in mind by the Chess
+Master. We must take it for granted that the student has already reached a
+stage where, while not being able fully to understand every move, yet he can
+derive benefit from any discussion with regard to them). The game continues
+thus:</p>
+
+{{ game.pgn("example50", "chapter4", "capablanca-cf") }}
+
+<h3>Example 51. </h3>
+
+<p>Another example of this kind.</p>
+
+<p>In the position below the simple move Nxe5 would win, but White looks for
+complications and their beauties. Such a course is highly risky until a wide
+experience of actual master-play has developed a sufficient insight into all
+the possibilities of a position. This game, which won the brilliancy prize at
+St. Petersburg in 1914, continued as follows:</p>
+
+{{ game.pgn("example51", "chapter4", "capablanca-cf") }}
+
+<p>The student should note that in the examples given the attack is carried
+out with every available piece, and that often, as in some of the variations
+pointed out, it is the coming into action of the last available piece that
+finally overthrows the enemy. It demonstrates the principle already
+stated:</p>
+
+<p><em>Direct and violent attacks against the King must be carried "en masse",
+with full force, to ensure their success. The opposition must be overcome at
+all cost; the attack cannot be broken off, since in all such cases that means
+defeat.</em></p>
+
+{% endblock %}

File wsgi/templates/capablanca-cf/chapter4/force_threatened_attack.html

+{% extends "capablanca-cf-base.html" %}
+{% block title %}
+22. The force of the threatened attack
+{% endblock %}
+
+{% block content %}
+<h1>22. The force of the threatened attack</h1>
+
+<p>Failing an opportunity, in the second case, for direct attack, one must
+attempt to increase whatever weakness there may be in the opponent's position;
+or, if there is none, one or more must be created. It is always an advantage
+to threaten something, but such threats must be carried into effect only if
+something is to be gained immediately. For, holding the threat in hand, forces
+the opponent to provide against its execution and to keep material in
+readiness to meet it. Thus he may more easily overlook, or be unable to parry,
+a thrust at another point. But once the threat is carried into effect, it
+exists no longer, and your opponent can devote his attention to his own
+schemes. One of the best and most successful manoeuvres in this type of game
+is to make a demonstration on one side, so as to draw the forces of your
+opponent to that side, then through the greater mobility of your pieces to
+shift your forces quickly to the other side and break through, before your
+opponent has had the time to bring over the necessary forces for the
+defence.</p>
+
+<p>A good example of positional play is shown in the following game.</p>
+
+<h3>Example 52. </h3>
+
+<p>Played at the Havana International Masters Tournament, 1913.</p>
+
+<p>(French Defence) <strong>White: J. R. Capablanca. Black: R. Blanco.</strong></p>
+
+{{ game.pgn("example52", "chapter4", "capablanca-cf") }}
+
+<p>Commenting on White's play in this game, Dr. E. Lasker said at the time
+that if White's play were properly analysed it might be found that there
+was no way to improve upon it.</p>
+
+<p>These apparently simple games are often of the most difficult nature.
+Perfection in such cases is much more difficult to obtain than in those
+positions calling for a brilliant direct attack against the King,
+involving sacrifices of pieces.</p>
+
+{% endblock %}

File wsgi/templates/capablanca-cf/chapter4/the_initiative.html

+{% extends "capablanca-cf-base.html" %}
+{% block title %}
+20. The initiative
+{% endblock %}
+
+{% block content %}
+<h1>20. The initiative</h1>
+
+<p>Before we revert to the technique of the openings it will be advisable to
+dwell a little on general theory, so that the openings in their relation to
+the rest of the game may be better understood.</p>
+
+<p>As the pieces are set on the board both sides have the same position and
+the same amount of material. White, however, has the move, and the move in
+this case means <em>the initiative</em>, and the initiative, other things
+being equal, is an advantage. Now this advantage must be kept as long as
+possible, and should only be given up if some other advantage, material or
+positional, is obtained in its place. White, according to the principles
+already laid down, develops his pieces as fast as possible, but in so doing he
+also tries to hinder his opponent's development, by applying pressure wherever
+possible. He tries first of all to control the centre, and failing this to
+obtain some positional advantage that will make it possible for him to keep on
+harassing the enemy. He only relinquishes the initiative when he gets for it
+some material advantage under such favourable conditions as to make him feel
+assured that he will, in turn, be able to withstand his adversary's thrust;
+and finally, through his superiority of material, once more resume the
+initiative, which alone can give him the victory. This last assertion is
+self-evident, since, in order to win the game, the opposing King must be
+driven to a position where he is attacked without having any way of escape.
+Once the pieces have been properly developed the resulting positions may vary
+in character. It may be that a direct attack against the King is in order; or
+that it is a case of improving a position already advantageous; or, finally,
+that some material can be gained at the cost of relinquishing the initiative
+for a more or less prolonged period.</p>
+
+{% endblock %}