etc / ipythonrc

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# -*- Mode: Shell-Script -*-  Not really, but shows comments correctly
# $Id: ipythonrc 1979 2006-12-12 18:50:20Z vivainio $

#***************************************************************************
#
# Configuration file for IPython -- ipythonrc format
#
# ===========================================================
# Deprecation note: you should look into modifying ipy_user_conf.py (located 
# in ~/.ipython or ~/_ipython, depending on your platform) instead, it's a 
# more flexible and robust (and better supported!) configuration
# method.
# ===========================================================
#
# The format of this file is simply one of 'key value' lines.
# Lines containing only whitespace at the beginning and then a # are ignored
# as comments. But comments can NOT be put on lines with data.

# The meaning and use of each key are explained below.

#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Section: included files

# Put one or more *config* files (with the syntax of this file) you want to
# include. For keys with a unique value the outermost file has precedence. For
# keys with multiple values, they all get assembled into a list which then
# gets loaded by IPython.

# In this file, all lists of things should simply be space-separated.

# This allows you to build hierarchies of files which recursively load
# lower-level services. If this is your main ~/.ipython/ipythonrc file, you
# should only keep here basic things you always want available. Then you can
# include it in every other special-purpose config file you create.
include 

#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Section: startup setup

# These are mostly things which parallel a command line option of the same
# name.

# Keys in this section should only appear once. If any key from this section
# is encountered more than once, the last value remains, all earlier ones get
# discarded.


# Automatic calling of callable objects.  If set to 1 or 2, callable objects
# are automatically called when invoked at the command line, even if you don't
# type parentheses.  IPython adds the parentheses for you.  For example:

#In [1]: str 45
#------> str(45)
#Out[1]: '45'

# IPython reprints your line with '---->' indicating that it added
# parentheses.  While this option is very convenient for interactive use, it
# may occasionally cause problems with objects which have side-effects if
# called unexpectedly.

# The valid values for autocall are:

# autocall 0 -> disabled (you can toggle it at runtime with the %autocall magic)

# autocall 1 -> active, but do not apply if there are no arguments on the line.

# In this mode, you get:

#In [1]: callable
#Out[1]: <built-in function callable>

#In [2]: callable 'hello'
#------> callable('hello')
#Out[2]: False

# 2 -> Active always.  Even if no arguments are present, the callable object
# is called:

#In [4]: callable
#------> callable()

# Note that even with autocall off, you can still use '/' at the start of a
# line to treat the first argument on the command line as a function and add
# parentheses to it:

#In [8]: /str 43
#------> str(43)
#Out[8]: '43'

autocall 1

# Auto-edit syntax errors.  When you use the %edit magic in ipython to edit
# source code (see the 'editor' variable below), it is possible that you save
# a file with syntax errors in it.  If this variable is true, IPython will ask
# you whether to re-open the editor immediately to correct such an error.

autoedit_syntax 0

# Auto-indent. IPython can recognize lines ending in ':' and indent the next
# line, while also un-indenting automatically after 'raise' or 'return'.  

# This feature uses the readline library, so it will honor your ~/.inputrc
# configuration (or whatever file your INPUTRC variable points to).  Adding
# the following lines to your .inputrc file can make indent/unindenting more
# convenient (M-i indents, M-u unindents):

#  $if Python
#  "\M-i": "    "
#  "\M-u": "\d\d\d\d"
#  $endif

# The feature is potentially a bit dangerous, because it can cause problems
# with pasting of indented code (the pasted code gets re-indented on each
# line).  But it's a huge time-saver when working interactively.  The magic
# function %autoindent allows you to toggle it on/off at runtime.

autoindent 1

# Auto-magic. This gives you access to all the magic functions without having
# to prepend them with an % sign. If you define a variable with the same name
# as a magic function (say who=1), you will need to access the magic function
# with % (%who in this example). However, if later you delete your variable
# (del who), you'll recover the automagic calling form.

# Considering that many magic functions provide a lot of shell-like
# functionality, automagic gives you something close to a full Python+system
# shell environment (and you can extend it further if you want).

automagic 1

# Size of the output cache. After this many entries are stored, the cache will
# get flushed. Depending on the size of your intermediate calculations, you
# may have memory problems if you make it too big, since keeping things in the
# cache prevents Python from reclaiming the memory for old results. Experiment
# with a value that works well for you.

# If you choose cache_size 0 IPython will revert to python's regular >>>
# unnumbered prompt. You will still have _, __ and ___ for your last three
# results, but that will be it.  No dynamic _1, _2, etc. will be created. If
# you are running on a slow machine or with very limited memory, this may
# help.

cache_size 1000

# Classic mode: Setting 'classic 1' you lose many of IPython niceties,
# but that's your choice! Classic 1 -> same as IPython -classic.
# Note that this is _not_ the normal python interpreter, it's simply
# IPython emulating most of the classic interpreter's behavior.
classic 0

# colors - Coloring option for prompts and traceback printouts.

# Currently available schemes: NoColor, Linux, LightBG.

# This option allows coloring the prompts and traceback printouts. This
# requires a terminal which can properly handle color escape sequences. If you
# are having problems with this, use the NoColor scheme (uses no color escapes
# at all).

# The Linux option works well in linux console type environments: dark
# background with light fonts.

# LightBG is similar to Linux but swaps dark/light colors to be more readable
# in light background terminals.

# keep uncommented only the one you want:
colors Linux
#colors LightBG
#colors NoColor

########################
# Note to Windows users
#
# Color and readline support is avaialble to Windows users via Gary Bishop's
# readline library.  You can find Gary's tools at
# http://sourceforge.net/projects/uncpythontools.
# Note that his readline module requires in turn the ctypes library, available
# at http://starship.python.net/crew/theller/ctypes.
########################

# color_info: IPython can display information about objects via a set of
# functions, and optionally can use colors for this, syntax highlighting
# source code and various other elements. This information is passed through a
# pager (it defaults to 'less' if $PAGER is not set). 

# If your pager has problems, try to setting it to properly handle escapes
# (see the less manpage for detail), or disable this option.  The magic
# function %color_info allows you to toggle this interactively for testing.

color_info 1

# confirm_exit: set to 1 if you want IPython to confirm when you try to exit
# with an EOF (Control-d in Unix, Control-Z/Enter in Windows). Note that using
# the magic functions %Exit or %Quit you can force a direct exit, bypassing
# any confirmation.

confirm_exit 0

# Use deep_reload() as a substitute for reload() by default. deep_reload() is
# still available as dreload() and appears as a builtin.

deep_reload 0

# Which editor to use with the %edit command. If you leave this at 0, IPython
# will honor your EDITOR environment variable. Since this editor is invoked on
# the fly by ipython and is meant for editing small code snippets, you may
# want to use a small, lightweight editor here.

# For Emacs users, setting up your Emacs server properly as described in the
# manual is a good idea. An alternative is to use jed, a very light editor
# with much of the feel of Emacs (though not as powerful for heavy-duty work).

editor 0

# log 1 -> same as ipython -log. This automatically logs to ./ipython.log
log 0

# Same as ipython -Logfile YourLogfileName. 
# Don't use with log 1 (use one or the other)
logfile ''

# banner 0 -> same as ipython -nobanner
banner 0

# messages 0 -> same as ipython -nomessages
messages 1

# Automatically call the pdb debugger after every uncaught exception. If you
# are used to debugging using pdb, this puts you automatically inside of it
# after any call (either in IPython or in code called by it) which triggers an
# exception which goes uncaught.
pdb 0

# Enable the pprint module for printing. pprint tends to give a more readable
# display (than print) for complex nested data structures.
pprint 1

# Prompt strings

# Most bash-like escapes can be used to customize IPython's prompts, as well as
# a few additional ones which are IPython-specific.  All valid prompt escapes
# are described in detail in the Customization section of the IPython HTML/PDF
# manual.

# Use \# to represent the current prompt number, and quote them to protect
# spaces.
prompt_in1 'In [\#]: '

# \D is replaced by as many dots as there are digits in the
# current value of \#.
prompt_in2 '   .\D.: '

prompt_out 'Out[\#]: '

# Select whether to left-pad the output prompts to match the length of the
# input ones.  This allows you for example to use a simple '>' as an output
# prompt, and yet have the output line up with the input.  If set to false,
# the output prompts will be unpadded (flush left).
prompts_pad_left 1

# quick 1 -> same as ipython -quick
quick 0

# Use the readline library (1) or not (0). Most users will want this on, but
# if you experience strange problems with line management (mainly when using
# IPython inside Emacs buffers) you may try disabling it. Not having it on
# prevents you from getting command history with the arrow keys, searching and
# name completion using TAB.

readline 1

# Screen Length: number of lines of your screen. This is used to control
# printing of very long strings. Strings longer than this number of lines will
# be paged with the less command instead of directly printed.

# The default value for this is 0, which means IPython will auto-detect your
# screen size every time it needs to print. If for some reason this isn't
# working well (it needs curses support), specify it yourself. Otherwise don't
# change the default.

screen_length 0

# Prompt separators for input and output.
# Use \n for newline explicitly, without quotes.
# Use 0 (like at the cmd line) to turn off a given separator.

# The structure of prompt printing is:
# (SeparateIn)Input....
# (SeparateOut)Output...
# (SeparateOut2),   # that is, no newline is printed after Out2
# By choosing these you can organize your output any way you want.

separate_in \n
separate_out 0
separate_out2 0

# 'nosep 1' is a shorthand for '-SeparateIn 0 -SeparateOut 0 -SeparateOut2 0'.
# Simply removes all input/output separators, overriding the choices above.
nosep 0

# Wildcard searches - IPython has a system for searching names using
# shell-like wildcards; type %psearch? for details.  This variables sets
# whether by default such searches should be case sensitive or not.  You can
# always override the default at the system command line or the IPython
# prompt.

wildcards_case_sensitive 1

# Object information: at what level of detail to display the string form of an
# object.  If set to 0, ipython will compute the string form of any object X,
# by calling str(X), when X? is typed.  If set to 1, str(X) will only be
# computed when X?? is given, and if set to 2 or higher, it will never be
# computed (there is no X??? level of detail).  This is mostly of use to
# people who frequently manipulate objects whose string representation is
# extremely expensive to compute.

object_info_string_level 0

# xmode - Exception reporting mode. 

# Valid modes: Plain, Context and Verbose.

# Plain: similar to python's normal traceback printing.

# Context: prints 5 lines of context source code around each line in the
# traceback.

# Verbose: similar to Context, but additionally prints the variables currently
# visible where the exception happened (shortening their strings if too
# long). This can potentially be very slow, if you happen to have a huge data
# structure whose string representation is complex to compute. Your computer
# may appear to freeze for a while with cpu usage at 100%. If this occurs, you
# can cancel the traceback with Ctrl-C (maybe hitting it more than once).

#xmode Plain
xmode Context
#xmode Verbose

# multi_line_specials: if true, allow magics, aliases and shell escapes (via
# !cmd) to be used in multi-line input (like for loops).  For example, if you
# have this active, the following is valid in IPython:
#
#In [17]: for i in range(3):
#   ....:     mkdir $i
#   ....:     !touch $i/hello
#   ....:     ls -l $i

multi_line_specials 1


# System calls: When IPython makes system calls (e.g. via special syntax like
# !cmd or !!cmd, or magics like %sc or %sx), it can print the command it is
# executing to standard output, prefixed by a header string.

system_header "IPython system call: "

system_verbose 1

# wxversion: request a specific wxPython version (used for -wthread)

# Set this to the value of wxPython you want to use, but note that this
# feature requires you to have the wxversion Python module to work.  If you
# don't have the wxversion module (try 'import wxversion' at the prompt to
# check) or simply want to leave the system to pick up the default, leave this
# variable at 0.

wxversion 0

#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Section: Readline configuration (readline is not available for MS-Windows)

# This is done via the following options:

# (i) readline_parse_and_bind: this option can appear as many times as you
# want, each time defining a string to be executed via a
# readline.parse_and_bind() command. The syntax for valid commands of this
# kind can be found by reading the documentation for the GNU readline library,
# as these commands are of the kind which readline accepts in its
# configuration file.

# The TAB key can be used to complete names at the command line in one of two
# ways: 'complete' and 'menu-complete'. The difference is that 'complete' only
# completes as much as possible while 'menu-complete' cycles through all
# possible completions. Leave the one you prefer uncommented.

readline_parse_and_bind tab: complete
#readline_parse_and_bind tab: menu-complete

# This binds Control-l to printing the list of all possible completions when
# there is more than one (what 'complete' does when hitting TAB twice, or at
# the first TAB if show-all-if-ambiguous is on)
readline_parse_and_bind "\C-l": possible-completions

# This forces readline to automatically print the above list when tab
# completion is set to 'complete'. You can still get this list manually by
# using the key bound to 'possible-completions' (Control-l by default) or by
# hitting TAB twice. Turning this on makes the printing happen at the first
# TAB.
readline_parse_and_bind set show-all-if-ambiguous on

# If you have TAB set to complete names, you can rebind any key (Control-o by
# default) to insert a true TAB character.
readline_parse_and_bind "\C-o": tab-insert

# These commands allow you to indent/unindent easily, with the 4-space
# convention of the Python coding standards.  Since IPython's internal
# auto-indent system also uses 4 spaces, you should not change the number of
# spaces in the code below.
readline_parse_and_bind "\M-i": "    "
readline_parse_and_bind "\M-o": "\d\d\d\d"
readline_parse_and_bind "\M-I": "\d\d\d\d"

# Bindings for incremental searches in the history. These searches use the
# string typed so far on the command line and search anything in the previous
# input history containing them.
readline_parse_and_bind "\C-r": reverse-search-history
readline_parse_and_bind "\C-s": forward-search-history

# Bindings for completing the current line in the history of previous
# commands. This allows you to recall any previous command by typing its first
# few letters and hitting Control-p, bypassing all intermediate commands which
# may be in the history (much faster than hitting up-arrow 50 times!)
readline_parse_and_bind "\C-p": history-search-backward
readline_parse_and_bind "\C-n": history-search-forward

# I also like to have the same functionality on the plain arrow keys. If you'd
# rather have the arrows use all the history (and not just match what you've
# typed so far), comment out or delete the next two lines.
readline_parse_and_bind "\e[A": history-search-backward
readline_parse_and_bind "\e[B": history-search-forward

# These are typically on by default under *nix, but not win32.
readline_parse_and_bind "\C-k": kill-line
readline_parse_and_bind "\C-u": unix-line-discard

# (ii) readline_remove_delims: a string of characters to be removed from the
# default word-delimiters list used by readline, so that completions may be
# performed on strings which contain them.

readline_remove_delims -/~

# (iii) readline_merge_completions: whether to merge the result of all
# possible completions or not.  If true, IPython will complete filenames,
# python names and aliases and return all possible completions.  If you set it
# to false, each completer is used at a time, and only if it doesn't return
# any completions is the next one used.

# The default order is: [python_matches, file_matches, alias_matches]

readline_merge_completions 1

# (iv) readline_omit__names: normally hitting <tab> after a '.' in a name
# will complete all attributes of an object, including all the special methods
# whose names start with single or double underscores (like __getitem__ or
# __class__).

# This variable allows you to control this completion behavior:

# readline_omit__names 1 -> completion will omit showing any names starting
# with two __, but it will still show names starting with one _.

# readline_omit__names 2 -> completion will omit all names beginning with one
# _ (which obviously means filtering out the double __ ones).

# Even when this option is set, you can still see those names by explicitly
# typing a _ after the period and hitting <tab>: 'name._<tab>' will always
# complete attribute names starting with '_'.

# This option is off by default so that new users see all attributes of any
# objects they are dealing with.

readline_omit__names 0

#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Section: modules to be loaded with 'import ...'

# List, separated by spaces, the names of the modules you want to import

# Example:
# import_mod sys os
# will produce internally the statements
# import sys
# import os

# Each import is executed in its own try/except block, so if one module
# fails to load the others will still be ok.

import_mod 

#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Section: modules to import some functions from: 'from ... import ...'

# List, one per line, the modules for which you want only to import some
# functions. Give the module name first and then the name of functions to be
# imported from that module.

# Example:

# import_some IPython.genutils timing timings
# will produce internally the statement
# from IPython.genutils import timing, timings

# timing() and timings() are two IPython utilities for timing the execution of
# your own functions, which you may find useful.  Just commment out the above
# line if you want to test them.

# If you have more than one modules_some line, each gets its own try/except
# block (like modules, see above).

import_some 

#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Section: modules to import all from : 'from ... import *'

# List (same syntax as import_mod above) those modules for which you want to
# import all functions. Remember, this is a potentially dangerous thing to do,
# since it is very easy to overwrite names of things you need. Use with
# caution.

# Example:
# import_all sys os
# will produce internally the statements
# from sys import *
# from os import *

# As before, each will be called in a separate try/except block.

import_all 

#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Section: Python code to execute.

# Put here code to be explicitly executed (keep it simple!)
# Put one line of python code per line. All whitespace is removed (this is a
# feature, not a bug), so don't get fancy building loops here.
# This is just for quick convenient creation of things you want available.

# Example:
# execute x = 1
# execute print 'hello world'; y = z = 'a'
# will produce internally
# x = 1
# print 'hello world'; y = z = 'a'
# and each *line* (not each statement, we don't do python syntax parsing) is
# executed in its own try/except block.

execute 

# Note for the adventurous: you can use this to define your own names for the
# magic functions, by playing some namespace tricks:

# execute __IPYTHON__.magic_pf = __IPYTHON__.magic_profile

# defines %pf as a new name for %profile.

#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Section: Pyhton files to load and execute.

# Put here the full names of files you want executed with execfile(file).  If
# you want complicated initialization, just write whatever you want in a
# regular python file and load it from here.

# Filenames defined here (which *must* include the extension) are searched for
# through all of sys.path. Since IPython adds your .ipython directory to
# sys.path, they can also be placed in your .ipython dir and will be
# found. Otherwise (if you want to execute things not in .ipyton nor in
# sys.path) give a full path (you can use ~, it gets expanded)

# Example:
# execfile file1.py ~/file2.py
# will generate
# execfile('file1.py')
# execfile('_path_to_your_home/file2.py')

# As before, each file gets its own try/except block.

execfile

# If you are feeling adventurous, you can even add functionality to IPython
# through here. IPython works through a global variable called __ip which
# exists at the time when these files are read. If you know what you are doing
# (read the source) you can add functions to __ip in files loaded here. 

# The file example-magic.py contains a simple but correct example. Try it:

# execfile example-magic.py

# Look at the examples in IPython/iplib.py for more details on how these magic
# functions need to process their arguments.

#---------------------------------------------------------------------------
# Section: aliases for system shell commands

# Here you can define your own names for system commands. The syntax is
# similar to that of the builtin %alias function:

# alias alias_name command_string

# The resulting aliases are auto-generated magic functions (hence usable as
# %alias_name)

# For example:

# alias myls ls -la

# will define 'myls' as an alias for executing the system command 'ls -la'.
# This allows you to customize IPython's environment to have the same aliases
# you are accustomed to from your own shell.

# You can also define aliases with parameters using %s specifiers (one per
# parameter):

# alias parts echo first %s second %s

# will give you in IPython:
# >>> %parts A B
# first A second B

# Use one 'alias' statement per alias you wish to define.

# alias 

#************************* end of file <ipythonrc> ************************
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