Georg Brandl avatar Georg Brandl committed 07a44bf

Backport rev 51866-51868 from trunk (sqlite3 documentation fixes).

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Doc/lib/libsqlite3.tex

 wait for the lock to go away until raising an exception. The default for the
 timeout parameter is 5.0 (five seconds). 
 
-For the \var{isolation_level} parameter, please see \member{isolation_level}
-\ref{sqlite3-Connection-IsolationLevel} property of \class{Connection} objects.
+For the \var{isolation_level} parameter, please see the \member{isolation_level}
+property of \class{Connection} objects in section~\ref{sqlite3-Connection-IsolationLevel}.
 
 SQLite natively supports only the types TEXT, INTEGER, FLOAT, BLOB and NULL. If
 you want to use other types, like you have to add support for them yourself.
     \verbatiminput{sqlite3/complete_statement.py}
 \end{funcdesc}
 
-\begin{funcdesc}{}enable_callback_tracebacks{flag}
+\begin{funcdesc}{enable_callback_tracebacks}{flag}
 By default you will not get any tracebacks in user-defined functions,
 aggregates, converters, authorizer callbacks etc. If you want to debug them,
 you can call this function with \var{flag} as True. Afterwards, you will get
 \label{sqlite3-Connection-IsolationLevel}
 \begin{memberdesc}{isolation_level}
   Get or set the current isolation level. None for autocommit mode or one of
-  "DEFERRED", "IMMEDIATE" or "EXLUSIVE". See  Controlling Transactions
-  \ref{sqlite3-Controlling-Transactions} for a more detailed explanation.
+  "DEFERRED", "IMMEDIATE" or "EXLUSIVE". See ``Controlling Transactions'', 
+  section~\ref{sqlite3-Controlling-Transactions}, for a more detailed explanation.
 \end{memberdesc}
 
 \begin{methoddesc}{cursor}{\optional{cursorClass}}
   The cursor method accepts a single optional parameter \var{cursorClass}.
-  This is a custom cursor class which must extend \class{sqlite3.Cursor}.
+  If supplied, this must be a custom cursor class that extends 
+  \class{sqlite3.Cursor}.
 \end{methoddesc}
 
 \begin{methoddesc}{execute}{sql, \optional{parameters}}
 Creates a user-defined function that you can later use from within SQL
 statements under the function name \var{name}. \var{num_params} is the number
 of parameters the function accepts, and \var{func} is a Python callable that is
-called as SQL function.
+called as the SQL function.
 
 The function can return any of the types supported by SQLite: unicode, str,
 int, long, float, buffer and None.
 
 Creates a collation with the specified \var{name} and \var{callable}. The
 callable will be passed two string arguments. It should return -1 if the first
-is ordered lower than the second, 0 if they are ordered equal and 1 and if the
+is ordered lower than the second, 0 if they are ordered equal and 1 if the
 first is ordered higher than the second.  Note that this controls sorting
 (ORDER BY in SQL) so your comparisons don't affect other SQL operations.
 
 
 \begin{memberdesc}{row_factory}
   You can change this attribute to a callable that accepts the cursor and
-  the original row as tuple and will return the real result row.  This
-  way, you can implement more advanced ways of returning results, like
-  ones that can also access columns by name.
+  the original row as a tuple and will return the real result row.  This
+  way, you can implement more advanced ways of returning results, such 
+  as returning an object that can also access columns by name.
 
   Example:
 
   \verbatiminput{sqlite3/row_factory.py}
 
-  If the standard tuple types don't suffice for you, and you want name-based
+  If returning a tuple doesn't suffice and you want name-based
   access to columns, you should consider setting \member{row_factory} to the
-  highly-optimized sqlite3.Row type. It provides both
+  highly-optimized \class{sqlite3.Row} type. \class{Row} provides both
   index-based and case-insensitive name-based access to columns with almost
-  no memory overhead. Much better than your own custom dictionary-based
-  approach or even a db_row based solution.
+  no memory overhead. It will probably be better than your own custom 
+  dictionary-based approach or even a db_row based solution.
+  % XXX what's a db_row-based solution?
 \end{memberdesc}
 
 \begin{memberdesc}{text_factory}
   attribute to \constant{sqlite3.OptimizedUnicode}.
 
   You can also set it to any other callable that accepts a single bytestring
-  parameter and returns the result object.
+  parameter and returns the resulting object.
 
   See the following example code for illustration:
 
 \end{memberdesc}
 
 \begin{memberdesc}{total_changes}
-  Returns the total number of database rows that have be modified, inserted,
+  Returns the total number of database rows that have been modified, inserted,
   or deleted since the database connection was opened.
 \end{memberdesc}
 
 
     \verbatiminput{sqlite3/execute_2.py}
 
-    \method{execute} will only execute a single SQL statement. If you try to
+    \method{execute()} will only execute a single SQL statement. If you try to
     execute more than one statement with it, it will raise a Warning. Use
-    \method{executescript} if want to execute multiple SQL statements with one
+    \method{executescript()} if you want to execute multiple SQL statements with one
     call.
 \end{methoddesc}
 
 \begin{methoddesc}{executemany}{sql, seq_of_parameters}
 Executes a SQL command against all parameter sequences or mappings found in the
 sequence \var{sql}. The \module{sqlite3} module also allows
-to use an iterator yielding parameters instead of a sequence.
+using an iterator yielding parameters instead of a sequence.
 
 \verbatiminput{sqlite3/executemany_1.py}
 
 \begin{methoddesc}{executescript}{sql_script}
 
 This is a nonstandard convenience method for executing multiple SQL statements
-at once. It issues a COMMIT statement before, then executes the SQL script it
+at once. It issues a COMMIT statement first, then executes the SQL script it
 gets as a parameter.
 
 \var{sql_script} can be a bytestring or a Unicode string.
 \lineii{BLOB}{buffer}
 \end{tableii}
 
-The type system of the \module{sqlite3} module is extensible in both ways: you can store
+The type system of the \module{sqlite3} module is extensible in two ways: you can store
 additional Python types in a SQLite database via object adaptation, and you can
 let the \module{sqlite3} module convert SQLite types to different Python types via
 converters.
 
 \subsubsection{Using adapters to store additional Python types in SQLite databases}
 
-Like described before, SQLite supports only a limited set of types natively. To
+As described before, SQLite supports only a limited set of types natively. To
 use other Python types with SQLite, you must \strong{adapt} them to one of the sqlite3
-module's supported types for SQLite. So, one of NoneType, int, long, float,
+module's supported types for SQLite: one of NoneType, int, long, float,
 str, unicode, buffer.
 
-The \module{sqlite3} module uses the Python object adaptation, like described in PEP 246
-for this.  The protocol to use is \class{PrepareProtocol}.
+The \module{sqlite3} module uses Python object adaptation, as described in \pep{246} for this.  The protocol to use is \class{PrepareProtocol}.
 
 There are two ways to enable the \module{sqlite3} module to adapt a custom Python type
 to one of the supported ones.
         self.x, self.y = x, y
 \end{verbatim}
 
-Now you want to store the point in a single SQLite column. You'll have to
-choose one of the supported types first that you use to represent the point in.
+Now you want to store the point in a single SQLite column.  First you'll have to
+choose one of the supported types first to be used for representing the point.
 Let's just use str and separate the coordinates using a semicolon. Then you
 need to give your class a method \code{__conform__(self, protocol)} which must
 return the converted value. The parameter \var{protocol} will be
 The other possibility is to create a function that converts the type to the
 string representation and register the function with \method{register_adapter}.
 
-    \verbatiminput{sqlite3/adapter_point_2.py}
-
 \begin{notice}
 The type/class to adapt must be a new-style class, i. e. it must have
 \class{object} as one of its bases.
 \end{notice}
 
+    \verbatiminput{sqlite3/adapter_point_2.py}
+
 The \module{sqlite3} module has two default adapters for Python's built-in
 \class{datetime.date} and \class{datetime.datetime} types.  Now let's suppose
 we want to store \class{datetime.datetime} objects not in ISO representation,
 
 \subsubsection{Converting SQLite values to custom Python types}
 
-Now that's all nice and dandy that you can send custom Python types to SQLite.
+Writing an adapter lets you send custom Python types to SQLite.
 But to make it really useful we need to make the Python to SQLite to Python
-roundtrip work.
+roundtrip work.  
 
 Enter converters.
 
-Let's go back to the Point class. We stored the x and y coordinates separated
-via semicolons as strings in SQLite.
+Let's go back to the \class{Point} class. We stored the x and y
+coordinates separated via semicolons as strings in SQLite.
 
-Let's first define a converter function that accepts the string as a parameter and constructs a Point object from it.
+First, we'll define a converter function that accepts the string as a
+parameter and constructs a \class{Point} object from it.
 
 \begin{notice}
 Converter functions \strong{always} get called with a string, no matter
  \item Explicitly via the column name
 \end{itemize}
 
-Both ways are described at \ref{sqlite3-Module-Contents} in the text explaining
-the constants \constant{PARSE_DECLTYPES} and \constant{PARSE_COlNAMES}.
+Both ways are described in ``Module Constants'', section~\ref{sqlite3-Module-Contents}, in
+the entries for the constants \constant{PARSE_DECLTYPES} and
+\constant{PARSE_COLNAMES}.
 
 
-The following example illustrates both ways.
+The following example illustrates both approaches.
 
     \verbatiminput{sqlite3/converter_point.py}
 
 There are default adapters for the date and datetime types in the datetime
 module. They will be sent as ISO dates/ISO timestamps to SQLite.
 
-The default converters are registered under the name "date" for datetime.date
-and under the name "timestamp" for datetime.datetime.
+The default converters are registered under the name "date" for \class{datetime.date}
+and under the name "timestamp" for \class{datetime.datetime}.
 
 This way, you can use date/timestamps from Python without any additional
 fiddling in most cases. The format of the adapters is also compatible with the
 
 \subsection{Controlling Transactions \label{sqlite3-Controlling-Transactions}}
 
-By default, the \module{sqlite3} module opens transactions implicitly before a DML
-statement (INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE/REPLACE), and commits transactions implicitly
-before a non-DML, non-DQL statement (i. e. anything other than
+By default, the \module{sqlite3} module opens transactions implicitly before a Data Modification Language (DML) 
+statement (i.e. INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE/REPLACE), and commits transactions implicitly
+before a non-DML, non-query statement (i. e. anything other than
 SELECT/INSERT/UPDATE/DELETE/REPLACE).
 
-So if you are within a transaction, and issue a command like \code{CREATE TABLE
+So if you are within a transaction and issue a command like \code{CREATE TABLE
 ...}, \code{VACUUM}, \code{PRAGMA}, the \module{sqlite3} module will commit implicitly
 before executing that command. There are two reasons for doing that. The first
 is that some of these commands don't work within transactions. The other reason
 
 Using the nonstandard \method{execute}, \method{executemany} and
 \method{executescript} methods of the \class{Connection} object, your code can
-be written more concisely, because you don't have to create the - often
-superfluous \class{Cursor} objects explicitly. Instead, the \class{Cursor}
+be written more concisely because you don't have to create the (often
+superfluous) \class{Cursor} objects explicitly. Instead, the \class{Cursor}
 objects are created implicitly and these shortcut methods return the cursor
-objects. This way, you can for example execute a SELECT statement and iterate
+objects. This way, you can execute a SELECT statement and iterate
 over it directly using only a single call on the \class{Connection} object.
 
     \verbatiminput{sqlite3/shortcut_methods.py}
 
 \subsubsection{Accessing columns by name instead of by index}
 
-One cool feature of the \module{sqlite3} module is the builtin \class{sqlite3.Row} class
+One useful feature of the \module{sqlite3} module is the builtin \class{sqlite3.Row} class
 designed to be used as a row factory.
 
 Rows wrapped with this class can be accessed both by index (like tuples) and
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