Overview

How to use Dt63
===============
The Dt63 encoder will accept either datetime objects or ISO-formatted time
strings, returning an ascii hash::

        >>> from datetime import datetime
        
        >>> import dt63

        >>> mydate = datetime(1996, 10, 5, 11, 44, 27, 73762)
        
        >>> mydate_str = str(mydate)
        
        >>> print mydate_str
        1996-10-05 11:44:27.073762
        
        >>> from_obj = dt63.encode(mydate)
        
        >>> from_str = dt63.encode(mydate_str)
        
        >>> assert from_obj == from_str
        
        >>> print from_obj, from_str
        J96A5BiR073762 J96A5BiR073762

The Dt63 encoder and decoder are registered
with the standard library codecs on import and may be used during str.encode
and str.decode calls::

        >>> datestr = str(datetime(2001, 8, 9, 12, 13, 33, 88321))
        
        >>> print datestr
        2001-08-09 12:13:33.088321
        
        >>> encdate = datestr.encode('dt63')
        
        >>> print encdate
        K0189CDX088321
        
        >>> assert encdate.decode('dt63') == datestr


What's the point?
+++++++++++++++++
I needed a way to retain fine-grained date information in some sort of id
which could be passed in http GET requests.  Yes, I'm sure there are a 
bajillion simpler ways to do this, but I felt like solving the problem
this way.
        
.. vim:filetype=rst