Vedran Miletić avatar Vedran Miletić committed ca2315a

Fixed issues #25, #39, #41, #43, #45. Thanks a lot to Ulrich for going thru the guide and finding errors.

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doc/beamerug-animations.tex

 \begin{command}{\multiinclude\opt{|[<|\meta{default overlay specification}|>]|}\oarg{options}\marg{base file name}}
   Except for the possibility of specifying a \meta{default overlay specification}, this command is identical to the |\multiinclude| command from the ppower4 package.
 
-  If no overlay specification is given, the command will search for files called \meta{base file name}|.|\meta{number} for increasing numbers \meta{number}, starting with zero. As long as it finds these files, it issues an |\includegraphics| command on them. The files following the first one are put ``on top'' of the first one. Between any two invocations of |\includegraphics|, a |\pause| command is inserted. You can modify this behaviour is different ways by given suitable \meta{options}, see below.
+  If no overlay specification is given, the command will search for files called \meta{base file name}|.|\meta{number} for increasing numbers \meta{number}, starting with zero. As long as it finds these files, it issues an |\includegraphics| command on them. The files following the first one are put ``on top'' of the first one. Between any two invocations of |\includegraphics|, a |\pause| command is inserted. You can modify this behavior in different ways by given suitable \meta{options}, see below.
 
   \example
   Assume that MetaPost has created files called |gra.0|, |gra.1|, and |gra.2|. You can then create frame consisting of three slides that incrementally show the graphic as follows:
 
   Also as for a movie, the \meta{sound poster text} will be be put in a box that, when clicked on, will start playing the movie. However, you might also leave this box empty and only use the |autostart| option. Once playback of a sound has started, it can only be stopped by starting the playback of a different sound or by use of the |\hyperlinkmute| command.
 
-  The supported sound formats depend on the viewer application. Some versions of Acrobat Reader support |.aif| and |.au|. Sometimes you also need to specify information like the sampling rate, even though this information could be extracted from the sound file and even though the \pdf\ standard specifies that the viewer application should do so. In this regard, some versions of Acrobat Reader seems to be non-standard-conforming.
+  The supported sound formats depend on the viewer application. Some versions of Acrobat Reader support |.aif| and |.au|. Sometimes you also need to specify information like the sampling rate, even though this information could be extracted from the sound file and even though the \pdf\ standard specifies that the viewer application should do so. In this regard, some versions of Acrobat Reader seem to be non-standard-conforming.
 
   This command only works together with |pdflatex|. If you use |dvips|, the poster is still shown, but clicking it has no effect and no sound is embedded in any way.
 

doc/beamerug-compatibility.tex

 
 \begin{package}{{babel}|[|\declare{|spanish|}|]|}
   \beamernote
-  When using the |spanish| style, certain features that clash with the functionality of the \beamer\ class will be turned off. In particular, the special behaviour of the pointed brackets |<| and |>| is deactivated.
+  When using the |spanish| style, certain features that clash with the functionality of the \beamer\ class will be turned off. In particular, the special behavior of the pointed brackets |<| and |>| is deactivated.
 
   \articlenote
   To make the characters |<| and |>| active in |article| mode, pass the option |activeospeccharacters| to the package |beamerbasearticle|. This will lead to problems with overlay specifications.
 
 \begin{package}{{msc}}
   \beamernote
-  Since this packages uses |pstricks| internally, everything that applies to pstricks also applies to |msc|.
+  Since this package uses |pstricks| internally, everything that applies to pstricks also applies to |msc|.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{musixtex}}

doc/beamerug-elements.tex

 \item Bibliography entries.
 \end{itemize}
 
-In the following examples, the color themes |seahorse| and |rose| are used to show where and how background colors are honoured. Furthermore, background colors have been specified for all elements that honour them in the default theme. In the default color theme, all of the large rectangular areas are transparent.
+In the following examples, the color themes |seahorse| and |rose| are used to show where and how background colors are honored. Furthermore, background colors have been specified for all elements that honor them in the default theme. In the default color theme, all of the large rectangular areas are transparent.
 
 \begin{innerthemeexample}{default}
   The default element theme is quite sober. The only extravagance is the fact that a little triangle is used in |itemize| environments instead of the usual dot.
 
-  In some cases the theme will honour background color specifications for elements. For example, if you set the background color for block titles to green, block titles will have a green background. The background specifications are currently honoured for the following elements:
+  In some cases the theme will honor background color specifications for elements. For example, if you set the background color for block titles to green, block titles will have a green background. The background specifications are currently honored for the following elements:
   \begin{itemize}
   \item Title, author, institute, and date fields in the title page.
   \item Block environments, both for the title and for the body.
 In the following examples the color theme |seahorse| is used. Since the default color theme leaves most backgrounds empty, most of the outer themes look too unstructured with the default color theme.
 
 \begin{outerthemeexample}{default}
-  The default layout theme is the most sober and minimalistic theme around. It will flush left the frame title and it will not install any head- or footlines. However, even this theme honours the background color specified for the frame title. If a color is specified, a bar occupying the whole page width is put behind the frame title. A background color of the frame subtitle is ignored.
+  The default layout theme is the most sober and minimalistic theme around. It will flush left the frame title and it will not install any head- or footlines. However, even this theme honors the background color specified for the frame title. If a color is specified, a bar occupying the whole page width is put behind the frame title. A background color of the frame subtitle is ignored.
 \end{outerthemeexample}
 
 \begin{outerthemeexample}{infolines}
 \end{outerthemeexample}
 
 \begin{outerthemeexample}[\oarg{options}]{smoothbars}
-  This theme behaves very much like the |miniframes| theme, at least with respect to the headline. There, the only difference is the smooth transitions are installed between the background colors of the navigation bar, the (optional) bar for the subsection name, and the background of the frame title. No footline is created. You can get the footlines of the |miniframes| theme by first loading the theme and then loading the |smoothbars| theme.
+  This theme behaves very much like the |miniframes| theme, at least with respect to the headline. The only differences are that smooth transitions are installed between the background colors of the navigation bar, the (optional) bar for the subsection name, and the background of the frame title. No footline is created. You can get the footlines of the |miniframes| theme by first loading that theme and then loading the |smoothbars| theme.
 
   The following \meta{options} can be given:
   \begin{itemize}
 
   The footline shows the author on the left and the talk's title on the right.
 
-  The colors are taken from |palette primary| and |palette fourth|.
+  The colors are taken from |palette primary| and |palette quarternary|.
 \end{outerthemeexample}
 
 \begin{outerthemeexample}{shadow}

doc/beamerug-emulation.tex

 \item
   If you use |pstricks| commands, you will either have to stick to using |latex| and |dvips| or will have to work around them using, for example, |pgf|. Porting lots of |pstricks| code is bound to be difficult, if you wish to switch over to |pdflatex|, so be warned. You can read more about that in Section~\ref{section-graphics} that talks about graphics.
 \item
-  If the file cannot be compiled because some \prosper\ command is not implemented, you will have to delete this command and try to mimick its behaviour using some \beamer\ command.
+  If the file cannot be compiled because some \prosper\ command is not implemented, you will have to delete this command and try to mimick its behavior using some \beamer\ command.
 \end{itemize}
 
 \begin{package}{{beamerprosper}}
   This package takes the following options:
   \begin{itemize}
   \item
-    \declare{|framesassubsections|} causes each frame to create its own subsection with the frame title as subsection name. This behaviour mimicks \textsc{ha}-\textsc{prosper}'s behaviour. In a long talk this will create way too many subsections.
+    \declare{|framesassubsections|} causes each frame to create its own subsection with the frame title as subsection name. This behavior mimicks \textsc{ha}-\textsc{prosper}'s behavior. In a long talk this will create way too many subsections.
   \end{itemize}
 
   \articlenote
 \end{notes}
 \end{document}
 \end{verbatim}
-  You can run, for example, pdf\LaTeX\ on the file to get a \beamer\ presentation with overlays. Adding the |notes| option will also show the note. Certain commands, like |\LeftFoot|, are ignored. You can change the theme using the usual commands. You can also use all normal \beamer\ commands and concepts, like overlay-specifications, in the file. You can also create an |article| version by using the class |article| and including the package |beamerarticle|.
+  You can run, for example, pdf\LaTeX\ on the file to get a \beamer\ presentation with overlays. Adding the |notes| option will also show the notes. Certain commands, like |\LeftFoot|, are ignored. You can change the theme using the usual commands. You can also use all normal \beamer\ commands and concepts, like overlay-specifications, in the file. You can also create an |article| version by using the class |article| and including the package |beamerarticle|.
 \end{package}
 
 In the following, the effects of \prosper\ commands in \beamer\ are listed.
 \item
   If you use |pstricks| commands, you will either have to stick to using |latex| and |dvips| or will have to work around them using, for example, |pgf|. Porting lots of |pstricks| code is bound to be difficult, if you wish to switch over to |pdflatex|, so be warned.
 \item
-  If the file cannot be compiled because some \seminar\ command is not implemented, you will have to delete this command and try to mimick its behaviour using some \beamer\ command.
+  If the file cannot be compiled because some \seminar\ command is not implemented, you will have to delete this command and try to mimick its behavior using some \beamer\ command.
 \end{itemize}
 
 \begin{package}{{beamerseminar}}
   This package takes the following options:
   \begin{itemize}
   \item
-    \declare{|accumulate|} causes overlays to be accumulated. The original behaviour of the \seminar\ package is that in each overlay only the really ``new'' part of the overlay is shown. This makes sense, if you really print out the overlays on transparencies and then really stack overlays on top of each other. For a presentation with a video projector, you rather want to present an ``accumulated'' version of the overlays. This is what this option does: When the new material of the $i$-th overlay is shown, the material of all previous overlays is also shown.
+    \declare{|accumulate|} causes overlays to be accumulated. The original behavior of the \seminar\ package is that in each overlay only the really ``new'' part of the overlay is shown. This makes sense, if you really print out the overlays on transparencies and then really stack overlays on top of each other. For a presentation with a video projector, you rather want to present an ``accumulated'' version of the overlays. This is what this option does: When the new material of the $i$-th overlay is shown, the material of all previous overlays is also shown.
   \end{itemize}
 
   \example
 \end{command}
 
 \begin{command}{\restep\marg{text}}
-  Same as |\step|, but the \meta{text} is shown one the same slide as the previous |\step| command. This is implemented by first decreasing the countern  |beamerpauses| by one before calling |\step|.
+  Same as |\step|, but the \meta{text} is shown one the same slide as the previous |\step| command. This is implemented by first decreasing the counter |beamerpauses| by one before calling |\step|.
 \end{command}
 
 \begin{command}{\reswitch\marg{alternate text}\meta{text}}

doc/beamerug-fonts.tex

 \end{verbatim}
 to get beautiful outline fonts and correct hyphenation. Note, however, that certain older versions of the LM~bundle did not include correct glyphs for ligatures like ``fi,'' which may cause trouble. Double check that all ligatures are displayed correctly and, if not, update your installation.
 
-Everything mentioned above applies to |pdflatex| and |latex|+|dvips|. Unlike those engines, |xelatex| and |lualatex| support OpenType fonts, and that means that you can use system fonts in your documents relatively easy. Details will eventually be documented in this manual, but, for now, you can take a look at the documentation for |fontspec| package which supports both engines. Also, note that when you use |lualatex| or |xelatex| with EU2 or EU1 encoding, respectively, by default you get OpenType Latin Modern fonts.
+Everything mentioned above applies to |pdflatex| and |latex|+|dvips|. Unlike those engines, |xelatex| and |lualatex| support OpenType fonts, and that means that you can use system fonts in your documents relatively easy. Details will eventually be documented in this manual. For now, you can take a look at the documentation for the |fontspec| package which supports both engines. Also, note that when you use |lualatex| or |xelatex| with EU2 or EU1 encoding, respectively, by default you get OpenType Latin Modern fonts.
 
 
 \subsection{Changing the Fonts Used for Different Elements of a Presentation}
   \begin{itemize}
   \item \declare{|size=|\meta{size command}} sets the size attribute of the \beamer\ font. The \meta{size command} should be a normal \LaTeX-command used for setting the font size or it should be empty. Useful commands include |\tiny|, |\scriptsize|, |\footnotesize|, |\small|, |\normalsize|, |\large|, |\Large|, |\huge|, and |\Huge|. \beamer\ also introduces the two font sizes |\Tiny| and |\TINY| for \emph{really} small text. But you should know \emph{exactly} what you are doing if you use them. You have been warned.
 
-    Note that there is a different between specifying an empty command and specifying |\normalsize|: Making the size attribute ``empty'' means that the font size should not be changed when this font is used, while specifying |\normalsize| means that the size should be set to the normal size whenever this font is used.
+    Note that there is a difference between specifying an empty command and specifying |\normalsize|: Making the size attribute ``empty'' means that the font size should not be changed when this font is used, while specifying |\normalsize| means that the size should be set to the normal size whenever this font is used.
   \item \declare{|size*=|\marg{size in pt}\marg{baselineskip}} sets the size attribute of the font to the given \meta{size in pt} and the baseline skip to the given value. Note that, depending on what kind of font you use, not all font sizes may be available. Also, certain font sizes are much less desirable than other ones; the standard commands take care of choosing appropriate sizes for you. Do not use this option unless you have a good reason. This command has the same effect as |size={\fontsize|\marg{size in pt}\marg{baselineskip}|}|.
   \item \declare{|shape=|\meta{shape command}} sets the shape attribute of the font. The command should be a command like |\itshape|, |\slshape|, |\scshape|, or |\upshape|.
   \item \declare{|shape*=|\marg{shape attribute abbreviation}} sets the shape attribute of the font using the \LaTeX's abbreviations for attributes. This command has the same effect as |shape={\fontshape|\marg{shape attributes abbreviation}|}|.

doc/beamerug-frames.tex

 
     Most of the fine details of normal \TeX\ page breaking also apply to this option. For example, when you wish equations to be broken automatically, be sure to use the |\allowdisplaybreaks| command. You can insert |\break|, |\nobreak|, and |\penalty| commands to control where breaks should occur. The commands |\pagebreak| and |\nopagebreak| also work, including their options. Since you typically do not want page breaks for the frame to apply also to the |article| mode, you can add a mode specification like |<presentation>| to make these commands apply only to the presentation modes. The command \declare{|\string\framebreak|} is a shorthand for |\pagebreak<presentation>| and \declare{|\string\noframebreak|} is a shorthand for |\nopagebreak<presentation>|.
 
-    The use of this option \emph{evil}. In a (good) presentation you prepare each slide carefully and think twice before putting something on a certain slide rather than on some different slide. Using the |allowframebreaks| option invites the creation of horrible, endless presentations that resemble more a ``paper projected on the wall'' than a presentation. Nevertheless, the option does have its uses. Most noticeably, it can be convenient for automatically splitting bibliographies or long equations.
+    The use of this option is \emph{evil}. In a (good) presentation you prepare each slide carefully and think twice before putting something on a certain slide rather than on some different slide. Using the |allowframebreaks| option invites the creation of horrible, endless presentations that resemble more a ``paper projected on the wall'' than a presentation. Nevertheless, the option does have its uses. Most noticeably, it can be convenient for automatically splitting bibliographies or long equations.
 
     \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 
     You can also add the optional information |=singleslide|. This tells \beamer\ that the frame contains only a single slide. In this case, the frame contents is \emph{not} written to a special file, but interpreted directly, which is ``faster and cleaner.''
   \item
-    \declare{|environment=|\meta{frame environment name}}. This option is useful only in conjuction with the |fragile| option (but it is not used for |fragile=singleslide|, only for the plain |fragile|). The \meta{frame environment name} is used to determine the end of the scanning when gathering the frame contents. Normally, the frame ends when a line reading |\end{frame}| is reached. However, if you use |\begin{frame}| inside another environment, you need to use this option:
+    \declare{|environment=|\meta{frame environment name}}. This option is useful only in conjunction with the |fragile| option (but it is not used for |fragile=singleslide|, only for the plain |fragile|). The \meta{frame environment name} is used to determine the end of the scanning when gathering the frame contents. Normally, the frame ends when a line reading |\end{frame}| is reached. However, if you use |\begin{frame}| inside another environment, you need to use this option:
 
     \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \item
   A frame icon, which is depicted as three slide icons ``stacked on top of each other''. This symbol is framed by arrows.
 \item
-  A subsection icon, which is depicted as a highlighted subsection entry in a table of contents. This symbols is framed by arrows.
+  A subsection icon, which is depicted as a highlighted subsection entry in a table of contents. This symbol is framed by arrows.
 \item
   A section icon, which is depicted as a highlighted section entry (together with all subsections) in a table of contents. This symbol is framed by arrows.
 \item
   \end{templateoptions}
 \end{element}
 
-The main background is drawn on top of the background canvas. It can be used to add, say, a grid to every frame or a big background picture or whatever.
+The main background is drawn on top of the background canvas. It can be used to add, say, a grid to every frame or a big background picture or whatever. If you plan to use a PNG image as a background image, use one with an alpha channel to avoid potential problems with transparency in some PDF viewers.
 
 \begin{element}{background}\yes\yes\yes
   \colorparents{background canvas}

doc/beamerug-globalstructure.tex

   \end{element}
 \end{command}
 
-\begin{command}{\subsection\sarg{mode specification}\declare{|*|}\marg{subsubsection name}}
-  Starts a subsection without an entry in the table of contents. No heading is created, but the \meta{subsubsection name} is shown in a possible sidebar.
+\begin{command}{\subsubsection\sarg{mode specification}\declare{|*|}\marg{subsubsection name}}
+  Starts a subsubsection without an entry in the table of contents. No heading is created, but the \meta{subsubsection name} is shown in a possible sidebar.
 \end{command}
 
-Often, you may want a certain type of frame to be shown directly after a section or subsection starts. For example, you may wish every subsection to start with a frame showing the table of contents with the current subsection hilighted. To facilitate this, you can use the following commands.
+Often, you may want a certain type of frame to be shown directly after a section or subsection starts. For example, you may wish every subsection to start with a frame showing the table of contents with the current subsection highlighted. To facilitate this, you can use the following commands.
 
 \begin{command}{\AtBeginSection\oarg{special star text}\marg{text}}
   The given text will be inserted at the beginning of every section. If the \meta{special star text} parameter is specified, this text will be used for starred sections instead. Different calls of this command will not ``add up'' the given texts (like the |\AtBeginDocument| command does), but will overwrite any previous text.

doc/beamerug-guidelines.tex

 \subsubsection{Font Size}
 \label{section-sizes}
 
-Perhaps the most obvious attribute of a font is its size. Fonts are traditionally measured in ``points.'' How much a point is depends on whom you ask. \TeX\ thinks a point is the 72.27th part of an inch, which is 2.54 cm. On the other hand, PostScript and Adobe think a point is the 72th part of an inch (\TeX\ calls this a big point). There are differences between American and European points. Once it is settled how much a point is, claiming that a text is in ``11pt'' means that the ``height'' of the letters in the font are 11pt. However, this ``height'' stems from the time when letters where still cast in lead and refers to the the vertical size of the lead letters. It thus does not need to have any correlation with the actual height of, say, the letter x or even the letter M. The letter x of an 11pt Times from Adobe will have a height that is different from the height of the letter x of an 11pt Times from UTC and the letter x of an 11pt Helvetica from Adobe will have yet another height.
+Perhaps the most obvious attribute of a font is its size. Fonts are traditionally measured in ``points.'' How much a point is depends on whom you ask. \TeX\ thinks a point is the 72.27th part of an inch, which is 2.54 cm. On the other hand, PostScript and Adobe think a point is the 72th part of an inch (\TeX\ calls this a big point). There are differences between American and European points. Once it is settled how much a point is, claiming that a text is in ``11pt'' means that the ``height'' of the letters in the font are 11pt. However, this ``height'' stems from the time when letters where still cast in lead and refers to the vertical size of the lead letters. It thus does not need to have any correlation with the actual height of, say, the letter x or even the letter M. The letter x of an 11pt Times from Adobe will have a height that is different from the height of the letter x of an 11pt Times from UTC and the letter x of an 11pt Helvetica from Adobe will have yet another height.
 
 Summing up, the font size has little to do with the actual size of letters. Rather, these days it is a convention that 10pt or 11pt is the size a font should be printed for ``normal reading.'' Fonts are designed so that they can optimally be read at these sizes.
 
 
 However, using small fonts can be tricky. Many PostScript fonts are just scaled down when used at small sizes. When a font is used at less than its normal size, the characters should actually be stroked using a slightly thicker ``pen'' than the one resulting from just scaling things. For this reason, high quality multiple master fonts or the Computer Modern fonts use different fonts for small characters and for normal characters. However, when you use a normal Helvetica or Times font, the characters are just scaled down. A similar problem arises when you use a light font on a dark background. Even when printed on paper in high resolution, light-on-dark text tends to be ``overflooded'' by the dark background. When light-on-dark text is rendered in a presentation this effect can be much worse, making the text almost impossible to read.
 
-You can counter both negative effects by using a bold versions for small text.
+You can counter both negative effects by using a bold version for small text.
 
 In the other direction, you can use larger text for titles. However, using a larger font does not always have the desired effect. Just because a frame title is printed in large letters does not mean that it is read first. Indeed, have a look at the cover of your favorite magazine. Most likely, the magazine's name is the typeset in the largest font, but you your attention will nevertheless first go to the topics advertised on the cover. Likewise, in the table of contents you are likely to first focus on the entries, not on the words ``Table of Contents.'' Most likely, you would not spot a spelling mistake there (a friend of mine actually managed to misspell \emph{his own name} on the cover of his master's thesis and nobody noticed until a year later). In essence, large text at the top of a page signals ``unimportant since I know what to expect.'' So, instead of using a very large frame title, also consider using a normal size frame title that is typeset in bold or in italics.
 

doc/beamerug-installation.tex

 
 In \TeX\ Live, use the |tlmgr| tool to install the packages called |beamer|, |pgf|, and |xcolor|. If you have a fairly recent version of \TeX\ Live, and you have done full installation, \beamer\ is included.
 
-\subsubsection{MiK\TeX and pro\TeX t}
+
+\subsubsection{MiK\TeX\ and pro\TeX t}
 
 For MiK\TeX\ and pro\TeX t, use the update wizard or package manager to install the (latest versions of the) packages called |beamer|, |pgf|, and |xcolor|.
 
+
 \subsubsection{Debian and Ubuntu}
 
 The command ``|aptitude install latex-beamer|'' should do the trick. If necessary, the packages |pgf| and |latex-xcolor| will be automatically installed. Sit back and relax. In detail, the following packages are installed:
 
 Ubuntu 8.04, 9.04 and 9.10 include \TeX\ Live 2007, and version 10.04 includes \TeX\ Live 2009.
 
+
 \subsubsection{Fedora}
 
-Fedora 12 and 13 include \TeX\ Live 2007, which includes \beamer. It can be installed by running the command ``|yum install texlive-texmf-latex|''. Jindrich Novy provides |rpm| packages for newer versions of \TeX\ Live for Fedora 12 and 13, at
+Fedora 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 include \TeX\ Live 2007, which includes \beamer. It can be installed by running the command ``|yum install texlive-texmf-latex|''. As with Debian, this allows you to manually install newer versions of \beamer\ into your local directory (explained below).
+
+Jindrich Novy provides \TeX\ Live 2010 |rpm| packages for Fedora 12 and 13, at
 \begin{verbatim}
 http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/TeXLive
 \end{verbatim}
-and it's also very likely that these packages will be a part of Fedora 14 once it's released.
+Fedora 14 will contain \TeX\ Live 2010 once it's released.
 
 
 \subsection{Installation in a texmf Tree}
 \end{verbatim}
 and place all files of the package in this directory.
 
-Finally, you need to rebuild \TeX's filename database. This is done by running the command |texhash| or |mktexlsr| (they are the same). In MiK\TeX package manager and \TeX\ Live |tlmgr|, there is a menu option to do this.
+Finally, you need to rebuild \TeX's filename database. This is done by running the command |texhash| or |mktexlsr| (they are the same). In MiK\TeX\ package manager and \TeX\ Live |tlmgr|, there is a menu option to do this.
 
 \lyxnote
 For usage of the \beamer\ class with \LyX, you have to do all of the above. You also have to make \LyX\ aware of the file |beamer.layout|. This file is \emph{not part of the \beamer\ package} since it is updated and managed by the \LyX\ development team. This means that in reasonably up-to-date \LyX\ versions this file will already be installed and nothing needs to be done.

doc/beamerug-interaction.tex

 
 \subsection{Repeating a Frame at a Later Point}
 
-Sometimes you may wish some slides of a frame to be shown in your main talk, but wish some ``supplementary'' slides of the frame to be shown only in the the appendix. In this case, the |\againframe| command is useful.
+Sometimes you may wish some slides of a frame to be shown in your main talk, but wish some ``supplementary'' slides of the frame to be shown only in the appendix. In this case, the |\againframe| command is useful.
 
 \begin{command}{\againframe\sarg{overlay specification}\opt{|[<|\meta{default overlay specification}|>]|}\oarg{options}\marg{name}}
   \beamernote

doc/beamerug-introduction.tex

 \setbeamertemplate{some beamer element}[square]
 %% Now squares are used
 
-\setbeamertemplate{some beamer element}[cirlce]{3pt}
+\setbeamertemplate{some beamer element}[circle]{3pt}
 %% New a circle is used
 \end{verbatim}
 
 As next to this paragraph, you will sometimes find the word \textsc{presentation} in blue next to some paragraph. This means that the paragraph applies only when you ``normally typeset your presentation using \LaTeX\ or pdf\LaTeX.''
 
 \articlenote
-Opposed to this, a paragraph with \textsc{article} next to it describes some behaviour that is special for the |article| mode. This special mode is used to create lecture notes out of a presentation (the two can coexist in one file).
+Opposed to this, a paragraph with \textsc{article} next to it describes some behavior that is special for the |article| mode. This special mode is used to create lecture notes out of a presentation (the two can coexist in one file).
 
 \lyxnote
-A paragraph with \textsc{lyx} next to it describes behaviour that is special when you use \LyX\ to prepare your presentation.
+A paragraph with \textsc{lyx} next to it describes behavior that is special when you use \LyX\ to prepare your presentation.
 \endgroup
 
 

doc/beamerug-license.tex

 
 The ``documentation of the package'' refers to all files in the subdirectory |doc| of the \beamer\ package. A detailed listing can be found in the file |doc/licenses/manifest-documentation.txt|. All files in other directories are part of the ``code of the package.'' A detailed listing can be found in the file |doc/licenses/manifest-code.txt|.
 
-In the resest of this section, the licenses are presented. The following text is copyrighted, see the plain text versions of these licenses in the directory |doc/licenses| for details.
+In the rest of this section, the licenses are presented. The following text is copyrighted, see the plain text versions of these licenses in the directory |doc/licenses| for details.
 
 
 \subsection{The GNU General Public License, Version 2}
 
 You may extract a single document from such a collection, and distribute it individually under this License, provided you insert a copy of this License into the extracted document, and follow this License in all other respects regarding verbatim copying of that document.
 
-\subsubsection{Aggregating with independent Works}
+\subsubsection{Aggregating with Independent Works}
 
 A compilation of the Document or its derivatives with other separate and independent documents or works, in or on a volume of a storage or distribution medium, is called an ``aggregate'' if the copyright resulting from the compilation is not used to limit the legal rights of the compilation's users beyond what the individual works permit. When the Document is included in an aggregate, this License does not apply to the other works in the aggregate which are not themselves derivative works of the Document.
 

doc/beamerug-localstructure.tex

 
 There are three predefined environments for creating lists, namely |enumerate|, |itemize|, and |description|. The first two can be nested to depth three, but nesting them to this depth creates totally unreadable slides.
 
-The |\item| command is overlay-specification-aware. If an overlay specification is provided, the item will only be shown on the specified slides, see the following example. If the |\item| command is to take an optional argument and an overlay specification, the overlay specification can either come first as in |\item<1>[Cat]| or come last as in |\item[Cat]<1>|.
+The |\item| command is overlay specification-aware. If an overlay specification is provided, the item will only be shown on the specified slides, see the following example. If the |\item| command is to take an optional argument and an overlay specification, the overlay specification can either come first as in |\item<1>[Cat]| or come last as in |\item[Cat]<1>|.
 \begin{verbatim}
 \begin{frame}
   There are three important points:
 
 \begin{element}{subsubitem}\no\yes\yes
   \colorfontparents{subitem}
+  Same as |subitem| for subsubitems, that is, for items on the third level of indentation.
 \end{element}
 
 \begin{element}{subsubitem projected}\no\yes\yes
   \colorfontparents{subitem projected}
+  Same as |subitem projected| for subsubitems, that is, for items on the third level of indentation.
 \end{element}
 
 
 The \beamer\ class predefines an environment for typesetting a ``block'' of text that has a heading. The appearance of blocks can easily be changed using the following template:
 
 \begin{element}{blocks}\semiyes\no\no
-  Changining this parent template changes the templates of normal blocks, alerted blocks, and example blocks.
+  Changing this parent template changes the templates of normal blocks, alerted blocks, and example blocks.
 
   \example
   |\setbeamertemplate{blocks}[default]|
 You can define new environments using the following command:
 
 \begin{command}{\newtheorem\opt{|*|}\marg{environment name}\oarg{numbered same as}\marg{head text}\oarg{number within}}
-  This command is used exactly the same way as in the |amsthm| package (as a matter of fact, it is the command from that package), see its documentation. The only difference is that environments declared using this command are overlay-specification-aware in \beamer\ and that, when typeset, are typeset according to \beamer's templates.
+  This command is used exactly the same way as in the |amsthm| package (as a matter of fact, it is the command from that package), see its documentation. The only difference is that environments declared using this command are overlay specification-aware in \beamer\ and that, when typeset, are typeset according to \beamer's templates.
 
   \articlenote
-  Environments declared using this command are also overlay-specification-aware in |article| mode.
+  Environments declared using this command are also overlay specification-aware in |article| mode.
 
   \example
   |\newtheorem{observation}[theorem]{Observation}|
 If you wish to define the environments like |theorem| differently (for example, have it numbered within each subsection), you can use the following class option to disable the definition of the predefined environments:
 
 \begin{classoption}{notheorems}
-  Switches off the definition of default blocks like |theorem|, but still loads |amsthm| and makes theorems overlay-specificiation-aware.
+  Switches off the definition of default blocks like |theorem|, but still loads |amsthm| and makes theorems overlay specification-aware.
 \end{classoption}
 
 The option is also available as a package option for |beamerarticle| and has the same effect.
 
 In order to draw a frame (a rectangle) around some text, you can use \LaTeX s standard command |\fbox| and also |\frame| (inside a \beamer\ frame, the |\frame| command changes its meaning to the normal \LaTeX\ |\frame| command). More frame types are offered by the package |fancybox|, which defines the following commands: |\shadowbox|, |\doublebox|, |\ovalbox|, and |\Ovalbox|. Please consult the \LaTeX\ Companion for details on how to use these commands.
 
-The \beamer\ class also defines two environments for creating coloured boxes.
+The \beamer\ class also defines two environments for creating colored boxes.
 
 \begin{environment}{{beamercolorbox}\oarg{options}\marg{beamer color}}
   This environment can be used to conveniently typeset some text using some \beamer-color. Basically, the following two command blocks do the same:
   \item
     \declare{|colsep*=|\meta{dimension}} sets an extra color separation space around the text that is \emph{horizontally outside the box}. This means that if the box has a background, this background will protrude by \meta{dimension} to the left and right of the text, but this protruding background will not be taken intro consideration by \TeX\ for typesetting purposes.
 
-    A typical example usage of this option arises when you insert a box with a coloured background in the middle of normal text. In this case, if the background color is set, you would like a background to be drawn behind the text \emph{and} you would like a certain extra space around this text (the background should not stop immediately at the borders of the text, this looks silly) \emph{and} you would like the normal text always to be at the same horizontal position, independently of whether a background is present or not. In this case, using |colsep*=4pt| is a good option.
+    A typical example usage of this option arises when you insert a box with a colored background in the middle of normal text. In this case, if the background color is set, you would like a background to be drawn behind the text \emph{and} you would like a certain extra space around this text (the background should not stop immediately at the borders of the text, this looks silly) \emph{and} you would like the normal text always to be at the same horizontal position, independently of whether a background is present or not. In this case, using |colsep*=4pt| is a good option.
   \item
     \declare{|shadow|}\opt{|=|\meta{true or false}} draws a shadow behind the box. Currently, this option only has an effect if used together with the |rounded| option, but that may change.
   \item
   \item
     \declare{|ignorebg|} causes the background color of the \meta{beamer color} to be ignored, that is, to be treated as if it were set to ``transparent'' or ``empty.''
   \item
-    \declare{vmode} causes \TeX\ to be in vertical mode when the box starts. Normally, \TeX\ will be in horizontal mode at the start of the box (a |\leavevmode| is inserted automatically at the beginning of the box unless this option is given). Only \TeX perts need this option, so, if you use it, you will probably know what you are doing anyway.
+    \declare{|vmode|} causes \TeX\ to be in vertical mode when the box starts. Normally, \TeX\ will be in horizontal mode at the start of the box (a |\leavevmode| is inserted automatically at the beginning of the box unless this option is given). Only \TeX perts need this option, so, if you use it, you will probably know what you are doing anyway.
   \end{itemize}
 \end{environment}
 
 
 \subsection{Abstract}
 
-The |abstract| environment is overlay-specificiation-aware in \beamer:
+The |{abstract}| environment is overlay specificiation-aware in \beamer:
 
 \begin{environment}{{abstract}\sarg{action specification}}
   You can use this environment to typeset an abstract.
 
 \subsection{Verse, Quotations, Quotes}
 
-\LaTeX\ defines three environments for typesetting quotations and verses: |verse|, |quotation|, and |quote|. These environments are also available in the \beamer\ class, where they are overlay-specification-aware. If an overlay specification is given, the verse or quotation is shown only on the specified slides and is covered otherwise. The difference between a |quotation| and a |quote| is that the first has paragraph indentation, whereas the second does not.
+\LaTeX\ defines three environments for typesetting quotations and verses: |verse|, |quotation|, and |quote|. These environments are also available in the \beamer\ class, where they are overlay specification-aware. If an overlay specification is given, the verse or quotation is shown only on the specified slides and is covered otherwise. The difference between a |quotation| and a |quote| is that the first has paragraph indentation, whereas the second hasn't.
 
 You can change the font and color used for these by changing the \beamer-colors and -fonts listed below. Unlike the standard \LaTeX\ environments, the default font theme typesets a verse in an italic serif font, quotations and quotes are typeset using an italic font (whether serif or sans-serif depends on the standard document font).
 
   \example
   |\footnote[frame,2]{Not proved.}|
   \example
-  |\footnote<.->{Der Spiegel, 4/04, S.\ 90.}|
+  |\footnote<.->{Der Spiegel, 4/04, S.~90.}|
 
   \begin{element}{footnote}\yes\yes\yes
     This template will be used to render the footnote. Inside this template, the following two inserts can be used:

doc/beamerug-nonpresentation.tex

 
 In the following, the ``article version'' of your presentation refers to a normal \TeX\ text typeset using, for example, the document class |article| or perhaps |llncs| or a similar document class. This version of the presentation will typically follow different typesetting rules and may even have a different structure. Nevertheless, you may wish to have this version coexist with your presentation in one file and you may wish to share some part of it (like a figure or a formula) with your presentation.
 
-In general, the article version of a talk is better suited as a handout thann a handout created using the simple |handout| mode since it is more economic and can include more in-depth information.
+In general, the article version of a talk is better suited as a handout than a handout created using the simple |handout| mode since it is more economic and can include more in-depth information.
 
 \subsubsection{Starting the Article Mode}
 
   The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
   \item
-    \declare{|activeospeccharacters|} will leave the character code of the pointed brackets as specified by other packages. Normally, \beamer\ will turn off the special behaviour of the two characters |<| and |>|. Using this option, you can reinstall the original behaviour at the price of possible problems when using overlay specifications in the |article| mode.
+    \declare{|activeospeccharacters|} will leave the character code of the pointed brackets as specified by other packages. Normally, \beamer\ will turn off the special behavior of the two characters |<| and |>|. Using this option, you can reinstall the original behavior at the price of possible problems when using overlay specifications in the |article| mode.
   \item
     \declare{|noamsthm|} will suppress the loading of the |amsthm| package. No theorems will be defined.
   \item
 \end{verbatim}
 \end{package}
 
-There is one remaining problem: While the |article| version can easily \TeX\ the whole file, even in the presence of commands like |\frame<2>|, we do not want the special article text to be inserted into our original \beamer\ presentation. That means, we would like all text \emph{between} frames to be suppressed. More precisely, we want all text except for commands like |\section| and so on to be suppressed. This behaviour can be enforced by specifying the option |ignorenonframetext| in the presentation version. The option will insert a |\mode*| at the beginning of your presentation.
+There is one remaining problem: While the |article| version can easily \TeX\ the whole file, even in the presence of commands like |\frame<2>|, we do not want the special article text to be inserted into our original \beamer\ presentation. That means, we would like all text \emph{between} frames to be suppressed. More precisely, we want all text except for commands like |\section| and so on to be suppressed. This behavior can be enforced by specifying the option |ignorenonframetext| in the presentation version. The option will insert a |\mode*| at the beginning of your presentation.
 
 The following example shows a simple usage of the |article| mode:
 
 \end{document}
 \end{verbatim}
 
-There is one command whose behaviour is a bit special in |article| mode: The line break command |\\|. Inside frames, this command has no effect in |article| mode, except if an overlay specification is present. Then it has the normal effect dictated by the specification. The reason for this behaviour is that you will typically inserts lots of |\\| commands in a presentation in order to get control over all line breaks. These line breaks are mostly superfluous in |article| mode. If you really want a line break to apply in all versions, say |\\<all>|. Note that the command |\\| is often redefined by certain environments, so it may not always be overlay-specification-aware. In such a case you have to write something like |\only<presentation>{\\}|.
+There is one command whose behavior is a bit special in |article| mode: The line break command |\\|. Inside frames, this command has no effect in |article| mode, except if an overlay specification is present. Then it has the normal effect dictated by the specification. The reason for this behavior is that you will typically inserts lots of |\\| commands in a presentation in order to get control over all line breaks. These line breaks are mostly superfluous in |article| mode. If you really want a line break to apply in all versions, say |\\<all>|. Note that the command |\\| is often redefined by certain environments, so it may not always be overlay-specification-aware. In such a case you have to write something like |\only<presentation>{\\}|.
 
 \subsubsection{Workflow}
 \label{section-article-version-workflow}
 The last flavor of the mode command behaves quite differently.
 
 \begin{command}{\mode\declare{|*|}}
-  The effect of this mode is to ignore all text outside frames in the |presentation| modes. In article mode it has no effect.
+  The effect of this mode is to ignore all text outside frames in the |presentation| modes. In |article| mode it has no effect.
 
   This mode should only be entered outside of frames. Once entered, if the current mode is a |presentation| mode, \TeX\ will enter a gobbling state similar to the gobbling state of the second ``flavor'' of the |\mode| command. The difference is that the text is now read token-wise, not line-wise. The text is gobbled token by token until one of the following tokens is found: |\mode|, |\frame|, |\againframe|, |\part|, |\section|, |\subsection|, |\appendix|, |\note|, |\begin{frame}|, and |\end{document}| (the last two are really tokens, but they are recognized anyway).
 

doc/beamerug-notes.tex

 
 Outside frames, the command |\note| creates a single note page. It is ``independent'' of any usage of the |\note| commands inside the previous frame. If you say |\note| inside a frame and |\note| right after it, \emph{two} note pages are created.
 
-In the following, the syntax and effects of the |\note| command \emph{inside} frames is described:
+In the following, the syntax and effects of the |\note| command \emph{inside} frames are described:
 
 \begin{command}{\note\sarg{overlay specification}\oarg{options}\marg{note text}}
   Effects \emph{inside} frames:
   Notes are ignored in |article| mode.
 \end{command}
 
-The following element dictates who the note pages are rendered:
+The following element dictates how the note pages are rendered:
 
 \begin{element}{note page}\yes\yes\yes
   This template is used to typeset a note page.  The template should contain a mentioning of the insert |\insertnote|, which will contain the note text. To squeeze more onto note pages you might consider changing the size of the \beamer-font |note page| to something small. The default is |\small|.
 
 Since you normally do not wish the notes to be part of your presentation, you must explicitly say so in the preamble if notes should be included in your presentation. You can use the following \beamer\ options for this:
 
-\begin{beameroption}{hide notes}
+\begin{beameroption}{hide notes}{}
   Notes are not shown. This is the default in a presentation.
 \end{beameroption}
 
-\begin{beameroption}{show notes}
+\begin{beameroption}{show notes}{}
   Include notes in the output file. Normal slides are also included and the note pages are interleaved with them.
 \end{beameroption}
 
 \end{beameroption}
 
 
-\begin{beameroption}{show only notes}
+\begin{beameroption}{show only notes}{}
   Include only the notes in the output file and suppresses all frames. This options is useful for printing them. If you specify this command, the |.aux| and |.toc| files are \emph{not} updated. So, if you add a section and re\TeX\ your presentation, this will not be reflected in the navigation bars (which you do not see anyway since only notes are output).
 \end{beameroption}

doc/beamerug-overlays.tex

 
 The approach taken by most presentation classes to overlays is somewhat similar to the above |\pause| command. These commands get a certain slide number as input and affect the text on the slide following this command in a certain way. For example, \textsc{prosper}'s |\FromSlide{2}| command causes all text following this command to be shown only from the second slide on.
 
-The \beamer\ class uses a different approach (though the abovementioned command is also available: |\onslide<2->| will have the same effect as |\FromSlide{2}|, except that |\onslide| transcends environments; likewise, |\pause| is internally mapped to a command with an appropriate overlay specifications). The idea is to add \emph{overlay specifications} to certain commands. These specifications are always given in pointed brackets and follow the command ``as soon as possible,'' though in certain cases \beamer\ also allows overlay specification to be given a little later. In the simplest case, the specification contains just a number. A command with an overlay specification following it will only have ``effect'' on the slide(s) mentioned in the specification. What exactly ``having an effect'' means, depends on the command. Consider the following example.
+The \beamer\ class uses a different approach (though the abovementioned command is also available: |\onslide<2->| will have the same effect as |\FromSlide{2}|, except that |\onslide| transcends environments; likewise, |\pause| is internally mapped to a command with an appropriate overlay specification). The idea is to add \emph{overlay specifications} to certain commands. These specifications are always given in pointed brackets and follow the command ``as soon as possible,'' though in certain cases \beamer\ also allows overlay specification to be given a little later. In the simplest case, the specification contains just a number. A command with an overlay specification following it will only have ``effect'' on the slide(s) mentioned in the specification. What exactly ``having an effect'' means, depends on the command. Consider the following example.
 \begin{verbatim}
 \begin{frame}
   \textbf{This line is bold on all three slides.}
 \end{frame}
 \end{verbatim}
 
-The command |\only|, which is introduced by \beamer, normally simply inserts its parameter into the current frame. However, if an overlay-specification is present, it ``throws away'' its parameter on slides that are not mentioned.
+The command |\only|, which is introduced by \beamer, normally simply inserts its parameter into the current frame. However, if an overlay specification is present, it ``throws away'' its parameter on slides that are not mentioned.
 
 Overlay specifications can only be written behind certain commands, not every command. Which commands you can use and which effects this will have is explained in the next section. However, it is quite easy to redefine an existing command such that it becomes ``overlay specification aware,'' see also Section~\ref{section-overlay-commands}.
 
 For the following commands, the effect of an overlay specification is special:
 
 \begin{command}{\onslide\opt{\meta{modifier}}\sarg{overlay specification}\opt{\marg{text}}}
-  The behaviour of this command depends on whether the optional argument \meta{text} is given or not (note that the optional argument is given in \emph{normal} braces, not in square brackets). If present, the \meta{modifier} can be either a~|+| or a~|*|.
+  The behavior of this command depends on whether the optional argument \meta{text} is given or not (note that the optional argument is given in \emph{normal} braces, not in square brackets). If present, the \meta{modifier} can be either a~|+| or a~|*|.
 
   If no \meta{text} is given, the following happens: All text following this command will only be shown  (uncovered) on the specified slides. On non-specified slides, the text still occupies space. If no slides are specified, the following text is always shown. You need not call this command in the same \TeX\ group, its effect transcends block groups. However, this command has a \emph{different} effect inside an |overprint| environment, see the description of |overprint|.
 
   \example
   |\only<3->{Text inserted from slide 3 on.}|
 
-  Since the overlay specification may also be given after the text, you can often use |\only| to make other commands overlay-specification-aware in a simple manner:
+  Since the overlay specification may also be given after the text, you can often use |\only| to make other commands overlay specification-aware in a simple manner:
 
   \example
 \begin{verbatim}
   The \meta{action specification} must be given in \TeX-mode and it must be given at the very start of the item.
 \end{command}
 
-The related command |\bibitem| is also overlay-specification-aware in the same way as |\item|.
+The related command |\bibitem| is also overlay specification-aware in the same way as |\item|.
 
 \begin{command}{\label\sarg{overlay specification}\marg{label name}}
-  If the \meta{overlay specification} is present, the label is only inserted on the specified slide. Inserting a label on more than one slide will cause a `multiple labels' warning. \emph{However}, if no overlay specification is present, the specification is automatically set to just `1' and the label is thus inserted only on the first slide. This is typically the desired behaviour since it does not really matter on which slide the label is inserted, \emph{except} if you use an |\only| command and \emph{except} if you wish to use that label as a hyperjump target. Then you need to specify a slide.
+  If the \meta{overlay specification} is present, the label is only inserted on the specified slide. Inserting a label on more than one slide will cause a `multiple labels' warning. \emph{However}, if no overlay specification is present, the specification is automatically set to just `1' and the label is thus inserted only on the first slide. This is typically the desired behavior since it does not really matter on which slide the label is inserted, \emph{except} if you use an |\only| command and \emph{except} if you wish to use that label as a hyperjump target. Then you need to specify a slide.
 
   Labels can be used as target of hyperjumps. A convenient way of labelling a frame is to use the |label=|\meta{name} option of the |frame| environment. However, this will cause the whole frame to be kept in memory till the end of the compilation, which may pose a problem.
 
 \end{frame}
 \end{verbatim}
 
-The above code uses the fact the \beamer\ makes the |\includegraphics| command overlay-specification-aware. It works nicely, but only if each |.pdf| file contains the complete graphic to be shown. However, some programs, like |xfig|, sometimes also produce series of graphics in which each file just contains the \emph{additional} graphic elements to be shown on the next slide. In this case, the first graphic must be shown not on overlay~1, but from overlay~1 on, and so on. While this is easy to achieve by changing the overlay specification |<1>| to |<1->|, the graphics must also be shown \emph{on top of each other}. An easy way to achieve this is to use \TeX's |\llap| command like this:
+The above code uses the fact the \beamer\ makes the |\includegraphics| command overlay specification-aware. It works nicely, but only if each |.pdf| file contains the complete graphic to be shown. However, some programs, like |xfig|, sometimes also produce series of graphics in which each file just contains the \emph{additional} graphic elements to be shown on the next slide. In this case, the first graphic must be shown not on overlay~1, but from overlay~1 on, and so on. While this is easy to achieve by changing the overlay specification |<1>| to |<1->|, the graphics must also be shown \emph{on top of each other}. An easy way to achieve this is to use \TeX's |\llap| command like this:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \begin{frame}
   \frametitle{The Three Process Stages}
 
 \subsection{Advanced Overlay Specifications}
 
-\subsubsection{Making Commands and Environments Overlay-Specification-Aware}
+\subsubsection{Making Commands and Environments Overlay Specification-Aware}
 
-This section explains how to define new commands that are overlay-specification-aware. Also, it explains how to setup counters correctly that should be increased from frame to frame (like equation numbering), but not from slide to slide. You may wish to skip this section, unless you  want to write your own extensions to the \beamer\ class.
+This section explains how to define new commands that are overlay specification-aware. Also, it explains how to setup counters correctly that should be increased from frame to frame (like equation numbering), but not from slide to slide. You may wish to skip this section, unless you  want to write your own extensions to the \beamer\ class.
 
 \beamer\ extends the syntax of \LaTeX's standard command |\newcommand|:
 
   Redeclares a command that already exists in the same way as |\newcommand<>|. Inside \meta{text}, you can still access to original definitions using the command |\beameroriginal|, see the example.
 
   \example
-  This command is used in \beamer\ to make |\hyperlink| overlay-specification-aware:
+  This command is used in \beamer\ to make |\hyperlink| overlay specification-aware:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \renewcommand<>{\hyperlink}[2]{\only#3{\beameroriginal{\hyperlink}{#1}{#2}}}
 \end{verbatim}
 \end{command}
 
 \begin{command}{\newenvironment\declare{|<>|}\marg{environment name}\oarg{argument number}\oarg{default optional value}\\ \marg{begin text}\marg{end text}}
-  Declares a new environment that is overlay-specification-aware. If this environment is encountered, the same algorithm as for |\newcommand<>| is used to parse the arguments and the overlay specification.
+  Declares a new environment that is overlay specification-aware. If this environment is encountered, the same algorithm as for |\newcommand<>| is used to parse the arguments and the overlay specification.
 
   Note that, as always, the \meta{end text} may not contain any arguments like |#1|. In particular, you do not have access to the overlay specification. In this case, it is usually a good idea to use |altenv| environment in the \meta{begin text}.
 
 \section<article>{This section exists only in the article mode}
 \end{verbatim}
 
+Presentation modes include |beamer|, |trans| and |handout|.
+
 You can also mix pure mode specifications and overlay specifications, although this can get confusing:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \only<article| beamer:1>{Riddle}
 
 This section also introduces a rather advanced concept. You may also wish to skip it on first reading.
 
-Some overlay-specification-aware commands cannot only handle normal overlay specifications, but also so called \emph{action specifications}. In an action specification, the list of slide numbers and ranges is prefixed by \meta{action}|@|, where \meta{action} is the name of a certain action to be taken on the specified slides:
+Some overlay specification-aware commands cannot only handle normal overlay specifications, but also so called \emph{action specifications}. In an action specification, the list of slide numbers and ranges is prefixed by \meta{action}|@|, where \meta{action} is the name of a certain action to be taken on the specified slides:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \item<3-| alert@3> Shown from slide 3 on, alerted on slide 3.
 \end{verbatim}
 
 The rest of this section explains how you can add your own actions and make commands action-specification-aware. You may wish to skip it upon first reading.
 
-You can easily add your own actions: An action specification like \meta{action}|@|\meta{slide numbers} simply inserts an environment called \meta{action}|env| around the |\item| or parameter of |\action| with |<|\meta{slide numbers}|>| as overlay specification. Thus, by defining a new overlay-specification-aware environment named \meta{my action name}|env|, you can add your own action:
+You can easily add your own actions: An action specification like \meta{action}|@|\meta{slide numbers} simply inserts an environment called \meta{action}|env| around the |\item| or parameter of |\action| with |<|\meta{slide numbers}|>| as overlay specification. Thus, by defining a new overlay specification-aware environment named \meta{my action name}|env|, you can add your own action:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \newenvironment{checkenv}{\only{\setbeamertemplate{itemize item}{X}}}{}
 \end{verbatim}
 \item<beamer:check@2> Text.
 \end{verbatim}
 
-This will change the itemization symbol before |Text.| to |X| on slide~2 in |beamer| mode. The definition of |checkenv| used the fact that |\only| also accepts an overlay-specification given after its argument.
+This will change the itemization symbol before |Text.| to |X| on slide~2 in |beamer| mode. The definition of |checkenv| used the fact that |\only| also accepts an overlay specification given after its argument.
 
 The whole action mechanism is based on the following environment:
 
 
 Any occurence of a |+|-sign may be followed by an \emph{offset} in round brackets. This offset will be added to the value of |beamerpauses|. Thus, if |beamerpauses| is 2, then |<+(1)->| expands to |<3->| and |<+(-1)-+>| expands to |<1-2>|.
 
-There is another special sign you can use in an overlay specification that behaves similarly to the |+|-sign: a dot. When you write |<.->|, a similar thing as in |<+->| happens \emph{except that the counter |beamerpauses| is not incremented} and \emph{except that you get the value of |beamerpauses| decreased by one}. Thus a dot, possibly followed by an offset, just expands to the current value of the counter |beamerpauses| minus one, possibly offset. This dot notation can be useful in case like the following:
+There is another special sign you can use in an overlay specification that behaves similarly to the |+|-sign: a dot. When you write |<.->|, a similar thing as in |<+->| happens \emph{except} that the counter |beamerpauses| is \emph{not} incremented and \emph{except} that you get the value of |beamerpauses| decreased by one. Thus a dot, possibly followed by an offset, just expands to the current value of the counter |beamerpauses| minus one, possibly offset. This dot notation can be useful in case like the following:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \begin{itemize}[<+->]
 \item Apple

doc/beamerug-themes.tex

   \item \declare{|secheader|} causes a headline to be inserted showing the current section and subsection. By default, this headline is not shown.
   \end{itemize}
 
-  \themeauthor Manuel Carro. Boadilla is a village in the vicinity of Madrid, hosting the Univeristy's Computer Science department.
+  \themeauthor Manuel Carro. Boadilla is a village in the vicinity of Madrid, hosting the University's Computer Science department.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{Madrid}
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}{AnnArbor}
-  Like |Boadille|, but using the colors of the University of Michigan.
+  Like |Boadilla|, but using the colors of the University of Michigan.
 
   \themeauthor Madhusudan Singh. The University of Michigan is located at Ann Arbor.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}{CambridgeUS}
-  Like |Boadille|, but using the colors of the MIT.
+  Like |Boadilla|, but using the colors of the MIT.
 
   \themeauthor Madhusudan Singh.
 \end{themeexample}
 \begin{themeexample}{Pittsburgh}
   A sober theme. The right-flushed frame titles creates an interesting ``tension'' inside each frame.
 
-  Pittsburgh is a town in the eastern USA. It hosts the second \textsc{recomb} workshop of \textsc{snp}s and haplotypes, 2004.
+  Pittsburgh is a town in the eastern USA. It hosted the second \textsc{recomb} workshop of \textsc{snp}s and haplotypes, 2004.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{Rochester}
 
   By default, the current entry of the table of contents in the sidebar will be highlighted by using a more vibrant color. A good alternative is to highlight the current entry by using a different color for the background of the current point. The color theme |sidebartab| installs the appropriate colors, so you just have to say
 \begin{verbatim}
-\usecolorhteme{sidebartab}
+\usecolortheme{sidebartab}
 \end{verbatim}
 
   This color theme works with all themes that show a table of contents in the sidebar.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{PaloAlto}
-  A variation in the |Berkeley| theme with less dominance of rectangular areas. The same \meta{options} as for the |Berkeley| theme can be given.
+  A variation on the |Berkeley| theme with less dominance of rectangular areas. The same \meta{options} as for the |Berkeley| theme can be given.
 
   Palo Alto is also near San Francisco. It hosted the Bay Area Theory Workshop 2004.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \subsection{Presentation Themes Included For Compatibility}
 
-Earlier versions of \beamer\ included some further themes. These themes are still available for compatibility, though they are now implemented differently (they also mainly install appropriate color, font, inner, and outer themes). However, they may or may not honour color themes and they will not be supported in the future. The following list shows which of the new themes should be used instead of the old themes. (When switching, you may want to use the font theme |structurebold| with the option |onlysmall|.)
+Earlier versions of \beamer\ included some further themes. These themes are still available for compatibility, though they are now implemented differently (they also mainly install appropriate color, font, inner, and outer themes). However, they may or may not honor color themes and they will not be supported in the future. The following list shows which of the new themes should be used instead of the old themes. (When switching, you may want to use the font theme |structurebold| with the option |onlysmall|.)
 
 \medskip
 \begin{tabular}{lp{13cm}}

doc/beamerug-transparancies.tex

-% Copyright 2003--2007 by Till Tantau
-% Copyright 2010 by Vedran Mileti\'c
-%
-% This file may be distributed and/or modified
-%
-% 1. under the LaTeX Project Public License and/or
-% 2. under the GNU Free Documentation License.
-%
-% See the file doc/licenses/LICENSE for more details.
-
-% $Header$
-
-\section{Creating Transparancies}
-\label{section-trans}
-\label{trans}
-
-The main aim of the \beamer\ class is to create presentations for beamers. However, it is often useful to print transparencies as backup, in case the hardware fails. A transparencies version of a talk often has less slides than the main version, since it takes more time to switch slides, but it may have more slides than the handout version. For example, while in a handout an animation might be condensed to a single slide, you might wish to print several slides for the transparency version.
-
-In order to create a transparencies version, specify the class option |trans|. If you do not specify anything else, this will cause all overlay specifications to be suppressed. For most cases this will create exactly the desired result.
-
-\begin{classoption}{trans}
-  Create a version that uses the |trans| overlay specifications.
-\end{classoption}
-
-In some cases, you may want a more complex behaviour. For example, if you use many |\only| commands to draw an animation. In this case, suppressing all overlay specifications is not such a good idea, since this will cause all steps of the animation to be shown at the same time. In some cases this is not desirable. Also, it might be desirable to suppress some |\alert| commands that apply only to specific slides in the handout.
-
-For a fine-grained control of what is shown on a handout, you can use \emph{mode specifications}. They specify which slides of a frame should be shown for a special version, for example for the handout version. As explained in Section~\ref{section-concept-overlays}, a mode specification is written alongside the normal overlay specification inside the pointed brackets. It is separated from the normal specification by a vertical bar and a space. Here is an example:
-\begin{verbatim}
-  \only<1-3,5-9| trans:2-3,5>{Text}
-\end{verbatim}
-
-This specification says: ``Normally (in |beamer| mode), insert the text on slides 1--3 and 5--9. For the transparencies version, insert the text only on slides 2,~3, and~5.'' If no special mode specification is given for |trans| mode, the default is ``always.'' This causes the desirable effect that if you do not specify anything, the overlay specification is effectively suppressed for the handout.
-
-An especially useful specification is the following:
-\begin{verbatim}
-  \only<3| trans:0>{Not shown on transparancies.}
-\end{verbatim}
-
-Since there is no zeroth slide, the text is not shown. Likewise, \verb!\alert<3| trans:0>{Text}! will not alert the text on a transparancy.
-
-You can also use a mode specification for the overlay specification of the |{frame}| environment as in the following example.
-\begin{verbatim}
-\begin{frame}<1-| trans:0>
-  Text...
-\end{frame}
-\end{verbatim}
-
-This causes the frame to be suppressed in the transparancies version. Also, you can restrict the presentation such that only specific slides of the frame are shown on the handout:
-\begin{verbatim}
-\begin{frame}<1-| trans:4-5>
-  Text...
-\end{frame}
-\end{verbatim}
-
-It is also possible to give only an alternate overlay specification. For example, |\alert<trans:0>{...}| causes the text to be always hilighted during the presentation, but never on the transparancies version. Likewise, |\frame<trans:0>{...}| causes the frame to be suppressed for the handout.
-
-Finally, note that it is possible to give more than one alternate overlay specification and in any order. For example, the following specification states that the text should be inserted on the first three slides in the presentation, in the first two slides of the transparency version, and not at all in the handout.
-\begin{verbatim}
-  \only<trans:1-2| 1-3| handout:0>{Text}
-\end{verbatim}
-
-If you wish to give the same specification in all versions, you can do so by specifying |all:| as the version. For example,
-\begin{verbatim}
-\frame<all:1-2>{blah...}
-\end{verbatim}
-
-ensures that the frame has two slides in all versions.

doc/beamerug-transparencies.tex

+% Copyright 2003--2007 by Till Tantau
+% Copyright 2010 by Vedran Mileti\'c
+%
+% This file may be distributed and/or modified
+%
+% 1. under the LaTeX Project Public License and/or
+% 2. under the GNU Free Documentation License.
+%
+% See the file doc/licenses/LICENSE for more details.
+
+% $Header$
+
+\section{Creating Transparencies}
+\label{section-trans}
+\label{trans}
+
+The main aim of the \beamer\ class is to create presentations for projectors (sometimes called beamers, hence the name). However, it is often useful to print transparencies as backup, in case the hardware fails. A transparencies version of a talk often has less slides than the main version, since it takes more time to switch slides, but it may have more slides than the handout version. For example, while in a handout an animation might be condensed to a single slide, you might wish to print several slides for the transparency version.
+
+In order to create a transparencies version, specify the class option |trans|. If you do not specify anything else, this will cause all overlay specifications to be suppressed. For most cases this will create exactly the desired result.
+
+\begin{classoption}{trans}
+  Create a version that uses the |trans| overlay specifications.
+\end{classoption}
+
+In some cases, you may want a more complex behavior. For example, if you use many |\only| commands to draw an animation. In this case, suppressing all overlay specifications is not such a good idea, since this will cause all steps of the animation to be shown at the same time. In some cases this is not desirable. Also, it might be desirable to suppress some |\alert| commands that apply only to specific slides in the handout.
+
+For a fine-grained control of what is shown on a handout, you can use \emph{mode specifications}. They specify which slides of a frame should be shown for a special version, for example for the handout version. As explained in Section~\ref{section-concept-overlays}, a mode specification is written alongside the normal overlay specification inside the pointed brackets. It is separated from the normal specification by a vertical bar and a space. Here is an example:
+\begin{verbatim}
+  \only<1-3,5-9| trans:2-3,5>{Text}
+\end{verbatim}
+
+This specification says: ``Normally (in |beamer| mode), insert the text on slides 1--3 and 5--9. For the transparencies version, insert the text only on slides 2,~3, and~5.'' If no special mode specification is given for |trans| mode, the default is ``always.'' This causes the desirable effect that if you do not specify anything, the overlay specification is effectively suppressed for the handout.
+
+An especially useful specification is the following:
+\begin{verbatim}
+  \only<3| trans:0>{Not shown on transparencies.}
+\end{verbatim}
+
+Since there is no zeroth slide, the text is not shown. Likewise, \verb!\alert<3| trans:0>{Text}! will not alert the text on a transparency.
+
+You can also use a mode specification for the overlay specification of the |{frame}| environment as in the following example.
+\begin{verbatim}
+\begin{frame}<1-| trans:0>
+  Text...
+\end{frame}
+\end{verbatim}
+
+This causes the frame to be suppressed in the transparencies version. Also, you can restrict the presentation such that only specific slides of the frame are shown on the handout:
+\begin{verbatim}
+\begin{frame}<1-| trans:4-5>
+  Text...
+\end{frame}
+\end{verbatim}
+
+It is also possible to give only an alternate overlay specification. For example, |\alert<trans:0>{...}| causes the text to be always highlighted during the presentation, but never on the transparencies version. Likewise, |\frame<trans:0>{...}| causes the frame to be suppressed for the handout.
+
+Finally, note that it is possible to give more than one alternate overlay specification and in any order. For example, the following specification states that the text should be inserted on the first three slides in the presentation, in the first two slides of the transparency version, and not at all in the handout.
+\begin{verbatim}
+  \only<trans:1-2| 1-3| handout:0>{Text}
+\end{verbatim}
+
+If you wish to give the same specification in all versions, you can do so by specifying |all:| as the version. For example,
+\begin{verbatim}
+\frame<all:1-2>{blah...}
+\end{verbatim}
+
+ensures that the frame has two slides in all versions.

doc/beamerug-tricks.tex

 
 When you wish to uncover a table line-by-line, you will run into all sorts of problems if there are vertical and horizontal lines in the table. The reason is that the first vertical line at the left end is drawn before the line is even read (and thus, in particular, before any |\onslide| command can be read). However, placing a |\pause| or |\uncover| at the end of the line before is also not helpful since it will then suppress the horizontal line below the last uncovered line.
 
-A possible way to solve this problem is not to use either horizontal or vertical lines. Instead, colouring the lines using the |colortbl| package is a good alternative to structure the table. Here is an optically pleasing example, where the table is uncovered line-wise:
+A possible way to solve this problem is not to use either horizontal or vertical lines. Instead, coloring the lines using the |colortbl| package is a good alternative to structure the table. Here is an optically pleasing example, where the table is uncovered line-wise:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \rowcolors[]{1}{blue!20}{blue!10}
 \begin{tabular}{l!{\vrule}cccc}

doc/beamerug-tutorial.tex

 There are two fields that Euclid does not know, but whose meaning he can guess: |\subtitle| and |\institute|. He adjusts them. (Euclid does not need to use the |\and| command, which is used to separate several authors, nor the |\inst| command, which just makes its argument a superscript).
 
 \lyxnote
-In \LyX, Euclid just edits the first lines having of the different styles like Author or Title or Date. He deletes the optional short fields.
+In \LyX, Euclid just edits the first lines constisting of fields like Author or Title or Date. He deletes the optional short fields.
 
 
 \subsection{The Title Page Frame}
 
 Eager to find out how the first page will look, he invokes |pdflatex| on his file |main.tex| (twice). He could also use |latex| (twice), followed by |dvips|, and then possibly |ps2pdf|, or |lualatex| (twice), or |xelatex| (twice). Then he uses the Acrobat Reader, |xpdf|, |evince| or |okular| to view the resulting |main.pdf|. Indeed, the first page contains all the information Euclid has provided until now. It even looks quite impressive with the colorful title and the rounded corners and the shadows, but he is doubtful whether he should leave it like that. He decides to address this problem later.
 
-Euclid is delighted to find out that clicking on a section or subsection in the navigation bar at the top hyperjumps there. Also, the small symbols at the bottom seem to be clickable. Toying around with them for a while, he finds that clicking on the arrows left or right of a symbols hyperjumps him backward or forward one slide~/ frame~/ subsection~/ section. Clicking on the left or right side of the symbol hyperjumps to the beginning or end of the frame~/ subsection~/ section. He finds the symbols quite small, but decides not to write an email to \beamer's author since he also thinks that bigger symbols would be distracting.
+Euclid is delighted to find out that clicking on a section or subsection in the navigation bar at the top hyperjumps there. Also, the small symbols at the bottom seem to be clickable. Toying around with them for a while, he finds that clicking on the arrows left or right of a symbol hyperjumps him backward or forward one slide~/ frame~/ subsection~/ section. He finds the symbols quite small, but decides not to write an email to \beamer's authors since he also thinks that bigger symbols would be distracting.
 
 \lyxnote
 Euclid chooses View $\to$ PDF to view the resulting presentation. On a slow machine, this may take a while. See Section~\ref{section-speedup} for ways of speeding up the compilation.

doc/beamerug-twoscreens.tex

 \section{Taking Advantage of Multiple Screens}
 \label{section-twoscreens}
 
-This section describes options provided by \beamer\ for taking advantage of computers that have more than one video output and can display different outputs on them. For such systems, one video output can be attached to a projector and the main presentation is shown there. The second video output is attached to a small extra monitor (or is just shown on the display of the computer) and shows, for example, special notes for you. Alternatively, the two outputs might be attached to two different projectors. One can then show the main presentation on the first projection and, say, the table of contents on the second. Or the second projection might show a version translated into a different language. Or the seoncd projection might alwyas show the ``previous'' slide. Or \ldots---we are sure you can think of further useful things.
+This section describes options provided by \beamer\ for taking advantage of computers that have more than one video output and can display different outputs on them. For such systems, one video output can be attached to a projector and the main presentation is shown there. The second video output is attached to a small extra monitor (or is just shown on the display of the computer) and shows, for example, special notes for you. Alternatively, the two outputs might be attached to two different projectors. One can then show the main presentation on the first projection and, say, the table of contents on the second. Or the second projection might show a version translated into a different language. Or the seoncd projection might always show the ``previous'' slide. Or \ldots---we are sure you can think of further useful things.
 
 The basic idea behind \beamer's support of two video outputs is the following: Using special options you can ask \beamer\ to create a \pdf-file in which the ``pages'' are unusually wide or high. By default, their height will still be 128mm, but their width will be 192mm (twice the usual default 96mm). These ``superwide'' pages will show the slides of the main presentation on the left and auxilliary material on the right (this can be switched using appropriate options, though hyperlinks will only work if the presentation is on the left and the second screen on the right).
 
-For the presentation you attach two screens to the system. The windowing system believe that the screen is twice as wide as it actually is. Everything the windowing system puts on the left half of this big virtual screen is redirected to the first video output, everything on the right half is redirected to the second video output.
+For the presentation you attach two screens to the system. The windowing system believes that the screen is twice as wide as it actually is. Everything the windowing system puts on the left half of this big virtual screen is redirected to the first video output, everything on the right half is redirected to the second video output.
 
-When the presentation program displays the specially prepared superwide \beamer-presentation, exactly the left half of the screen will be filled with the main presentation, the right part is filled with the auxilliary material---voil\`a. Not all presentation programs support this special feature. For example, the Acrobat Reader 6.0.2 will only use one screen in fullscreen mode on MacOS~X. You will have to find out for yourself whether your display program and system support showing superwise presentations stretching over two screens.
+When the presentation program displays the specially prepared superwide \beamer-presentation, exactly the left half of the screen will be filled with the main presentation, the right part is filled with the auxilliary material---voil\`a. Not all presentation programs support this special feature. For example, the Acrobat Reader 6.0.2 will only use one screen in fullscreen mode on MacOS~X. On the other hand, a program named PDF Presenter supports showing dual-screen presentations. Generally, you will have to find out for yourself whether your display program and system support showing superwide presentations stretching over two screens.
 
 \beamer\ uses the package |pgfpages| to typeset two-screen presentations. Because of this, your first step when creating a two-screen presentation is to include this package:
 \begin{verbatim}

doc/beameruserguide.tex

 \item
   You might wish to create notes for yourself that, ideally, are shown to you on your computer screen while the audience sees the presentation.
 \item
-  You might wish to create a printout of your talk, either for yourself for checking for errors.
+  You might wish to create a printout of your talk, either for yourself or for checking for errors.
 \item
-  You might wish to create a transparancies version of your talk as a fall-back.
+  You might wish to create a transparencies version of your talk as a fall-back.
 \end{itemize}
 
 This part dicusses how \beamer\ helps you with the creation of the above.
 
 \include{beamerug-notes}
-\include{beamerug-transparancies}
+\include{beamerug-transparencies}
 \include{beamerug-nonpresentation}
 \include{beamerug-twoscreens}
 
 
 The second howto explains how you can import (parts or) presentations created using some other \LaTeX-presentation class, like \prosper.
 
-The third and final howto talks about \translatorname, a package \beamer uses for translating simple strings.
+The third and final howto talks about \translatorname, a package \beamer\ uses for translating simple strings.
 
 \include{beamerug-tricks}
 \include{beamerug-emulation}
Tip: Filter by directory path e.g. /media app.js to search for public/media/app.js.
Tip: Use camelCasing e.g. ProjME to search for ProjectModifiedEvent.java.
Tip: Filter by extension type e.g. /repo .js to search for all .js files in the /repo directory.
Tip: Separate your search with spaces e.g. /ssh pom.xml to search for src/ssh/pom.xml.
Tip: Use ↑ and ↓ arrow keys to navigate and return to view the file.
Tip: You can also navigate files with Ctrl+j (next) and Ctrl+k (previous) and view the file with Ctrl+o.
Tip: You can also navigate files with Alt+j (next) and Alt+k (previous) and view the file with Alt+o.