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<!-- vim: set filetype=docbkxml shiftwidth=2 autoindent expandtab tw=77 : -->

<chapter id="chap.tour-basic">
  <?dbhtml filename="a-tour-of-mercurial-the-basics.html"?>
  <title>A tour of Mercurial: the basics</title>

  <sect1 id="sec.tour.install">
    <title>Installing Mercurial on your system</title>

    <para>Prebuilt binary packages of Mercurial are available for
      every popular operating system.  These make it easy to start
      using Mercurial on your computer immediately.</para>

    <sect2>
      <title>Linux</title>

      <para>Because each Linux distribution has its own packaging
	tools, policies, and rate of development, it's difficult to
	give a comprehensive set of instructions on how to install
	Mercurial binaries.  The version of Mercurial that you will
	end up with can vary depending on how active the person is who
	maintains the package for your distribution.</para>

      <para>To keep things simple, I will focus on installing
	Mercurial from the command line under the most popular Linux
	distributions.  Most of these distributions provide graphical
	package managers that will let you install Mercurial with a
	single click; the package name to look for is
	<literal>mercurial</literal>.</para>

      <itemizedlist>
	<listitem><para>Debian:</para>
	  <programlisting>apt-get install
	    mercurial</programlisting></listitem>
	<listitem><para>Fedora Core:</para>
	  <programlisting>yum install
	    mercurial</programlisting></listitem>
	<listitem><para>Gentoo:</para>
	  <programlisting>emerge mercurial</programlisting></listitem>
	<listitem><para>OpenSUSE:</para>
	  <programlisting>yum install
	    mercurial</programlisting></listitem>
	<listitem><para>Ubuntu: Ubuntu's Mercurial package is based on
	    Debian's.  To install it, run the following
	    command.</para>
	  <programlisting>apt-get install
	    mercurial</programlisting></listitem>
      </itemizedlist>

    </sect2>
    <sect2>
      <title>Solaris</title>

      <para>SunFreeWare, at <ulink
	  url="http://www.sunfreeware.com">http://www.sunfreeware.com</ulink>, 
	is a good source for a large number of pre-built Solaris
	packages for 32 and 64 bit Intel and Sparc architectures,
	including current versions of Mercurial.</para>

    </sect2>
    <sect2>
      <title>Mac OS X</title>

      <para>Lee Cantey publishes an installer of Mercurial for Mac OS
	X at <ulink
	  url="http://mercurial.berkwood.com">http://mercurial.berkwood.com</ulink>. 
	This package works on both Intel- and Power-based Macs. Before
	you can use it, you must install a compatible version of
	Universal MacPython <citation>web:macpython</citation>. This
	is easy to do; simply follow the instructions on Lee's
	site.</para>

      <para>It's also possible to install Mercurial using Fink or
	MacPorts, two popular free package managers for Mac OS X.  If
	you have Fink, use <command>sudo apt-get install
	  mercurial-py25</command>.  If MacPorts, <command>sudo port
	  install mercurial</command>.</para>

    </sect2>
    <sect2>
      <title>Windows</title>

      <para>Lee Cantey publishes an installer of Mercurial for Windows
	at <ulink
	  url="http://mercurial.berkwood.com">http://mercurial.berkwood.com</ulink>. 
	This package has no external dependencies; it <quote>just
	  works</quote>.</para>

      <note>
	<para>  The Windows version of Mercurial does not
	  automatically convert line endings between Windows and Unix
	  styles.  If you want to share work with Unix users, you must
	  do a little additional configuration work. XXX Flesh this
	  out.</para>
      </note>

    </sect2>
  </sect1>
  <sect1>
    <title>Getting started</title>

    <para>To begin, we'll use the <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	version</command> command to find out whether Mercurial is
      actually installed properly.  The actual version information
      that it prints isn't so important; it's whether it prints
      anything at all that we care about.</para>

    &interaction.tour.version;

    <sect2>
      <title>Built-in help</title>

      <para>Mercurial provides a built-in help system.  This is
	  invaluable for those times when you find yourself stuck
	  trying to remember how to run a command.  If you are
	  completely stuck, simply run <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	    help</command>; it will print a brief list of commands,
	  along with a description of what each does.  If you ask for
	  help on a specific command (as below), it prints more
	  detailed information.</para>

	&interaction.tour.help;

	<para>For a more impressive level of detail (which you won't
	  usually need) run <command role="hg-cmd">hg help <option
	      role="hg-opt-global">-v</option></command>.  The <option
	    role="hg-opt-global">-v</option> option is short for
	  <option role="hg-opt-global">--verbose</option>, and tells
	  Mercurial to print more information than it usually
	  would.</para>

    </sect2>
  </sect1>
  <sect1>
    <title>Working with a repository</title>

    <para>In Mercurial, everything happens inside a
      <emphasis>repository</emphasis>.  The repository for a project
      contains all of the files that <quote>belong to</quote> that
      project, along with a historical record of the project's
      files.</para>

    <para>There's nothing particularly magical about a repository; it
      is simply a directory tree in your filesystem that Mercurial
      treats as special. You can rename or delete a repository any
      time you like, using either the command line or your file
      browser.</para>

    <sect2>
      <title>Making a local copy of a repository</title>

      <para><emphasis>Copying</emphasis> a repository is just a little
	bit special.  While you could use a normal file copying
	command to make a copy of a repository, it's best to use a
	built-in command that Mercurial provides.  This command is
	called <command role="hg-cmd">hg clone</command>, because it
	creates an identical copy of an existing repository.</para>

      &interaction.tour.clone;

      <para>If our clone succeeded, we should now have a local
	directory called <filename class="directory">hello</filename>.
	This directory will contain some files.</para>

      &interaction.tour.ls;

      <para>These files have the same contents and history in our
	repository as they do in the repository we cloned.</para>

      <para>Every Mercurial repository is complete, self-contained,
	and independent.  It contains its own private copy of a
	project's files and history.  A cloned repository remembers
	the location of the repository it was cloned from, but it does
	not communicate with that repository, or any other, unless you
	tell it to.</para>

      <para>What this means for now is that we're free to experiment
	with our repository, safe in the knowledge that it's a private
	<quote>sandbox</quote> that won't affect anyone else.</para>

    </sect2>
    <sect2>
      <title>What's in a repository?</title>

      <para>When we take a more detailed look inside a repository, we
	can see that it contains a directory named <filename
	  class="directory">.hg</filename>.  This is where Mercurial
	keeps all of its metadata for the repository.</para>

      &interaction.tour.ls-a;

      <para>The contents of the <filename
	  class="directory">.hg</filename> directory and its
	subdirectories are private to Mercurial.  Every other file and
	directory in the repository is yours to do with as you
	please.</para>

      <para>To introduce a little terminology, the <filename
	  class="directory">.hg</filename> directory is the
	<quote>real</quote> repository, and all of the files and
	directories that coexist with it are said to live in the
	<emphasis>working directory</emphasis>.  An easy way to
	remember the distinction is that the
	<emphasis>repository</emphasis> contains the
	<emphasis>history</emphasis> of your project, while the
	<emphasis>working directory</emphasis> contains a
	<emphasis>snapshot</emphasis> of your project at a particular
	point in history.</para>

    </sect2>
  </sect1>
  <sect1>
    <title>A tour through history</title>

    <para>One of the first things we might want to do with a new,
      unfamiliar repository is understand its history.  The <command
	role="hg-cmd">hg log</command> command gives us a view of
      history.</para>

    &interaction.tour.log;

    <para>By default, this command prints a brief paragraph of output
      for each change to the project that was recorded.  In Mercurial
      terminology, we call each of these recorded events a
      <emphasis>changeset</emphasis>, because it can contain a record
      of changes to several files.</para>

    <para>The fields in a record of output from <command
	role="hg-cmd">hg log</command> are as follows.</para>
    <itemizedlist>
      <listitem><para><literal>changeset</literal>: This field has the
	  format of a number, followed by a colon, followed by a
	  hexadecimal string.  These are
	  <emphasis>identifiers</emphasis> for the changeset.  There
	  are two identifiers because the number is shorter and easier
	  to type than the hex string.</para></listitem>
      <listitem><para><literal>user</literal>: The identity of the
	  person who created the changeset.  This is a free-form
	  field, but it most often contains a person's name and email
	  address.</para></listitem>
      <listitem><para><literal>date</literal>: The date and time on
	  which the changeset was created, and the timezone in which
	  it was created.  (The date and time are local to that
	  timezone; they display what time and date it was for the
	  person who created the changeset.)</para></listitem>
      <listitem><para><literal>summary</literal>: The first line of
	  the text message that the creator of the changeset entered
	  to describe the changeset.</para></listitem></itemizedlist>
    <para>The default output printed by <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	log</command> is purely a summary; it is missing a lot of
      detail.</para>

    <para>Figure <xref endterm="fig.tour-basic.history.caption"
        linkend="fig.tour-basic.history"/> provides a
      graphical representation of the history of the <filename
	class="directory">hello</filename> repository, to make it a
      little easier to see which direction history is
      <quote>flowing</quote> in.  We'll be returning to this figure
      several times in this chapter and the chapter that
      follows.</para>

    <informalfigure id="fig.tour-basic.history">
      <mediaobject>
	<imageobject><imagedata fileref="images/tour-history.png"/></imageobject>
	<textobject><phrase>XXX add text</phrase></textobject>
	<caption><para id="fig.tour-basic.history.caption">Graphical history of
	    the <filename class="directory">hello</filename> repository</para>
	</caption>
      </mediaobject>
    </informalfigure>

    <sect2>
      <title>Changesets, revisions, and talking to other
	people</title>

      <para>As English is a notoriously sloppy language, and computer
	science has a hallowed history of terminological confusion
	(why use one term when four will do?), revision control has a
	variety of words and phrases that mean the same thing.  If you
	are talking about Mercurial history with other people, you
	will find that the word <quote>changeset</quote> is often
	compressed to <quote>change</quote> or (when written)
	<quote>cset</quote>, and sometimes a changeset is referred to
	as a <quote>revision</quote> or a <quote>rev</quote>.</para>

      <para>While it doesn't matter what <emphasis>word</emphasis> you
	use to refer to the concept of <quote>a changeset</quote>, the
	<emphasis>identifier</emphasis> that you use to refer to
	<quote>a <emphasis>specific</emphasis> changeset</quote> is of
	great importance. Recall that the <literal>changeset</literal>
	field in the output from <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	  log</command> identifies a changeset using both a number and
	a hexadecimal string.</para>
      <itemizedlist>
	<listitem><para>The revision number is <emphasis>only valid in
	      that repository</emphasis>,</para></listitem>
	<listitem><para>while the hex string is the
	    <emphasis>permanent, unchanging identifier</emphasis> that
	    will always identify that exact changeset in
	    <emphasis>every</emphasis> copy of the
	    repository.</para></listitem></itemizedlist>
      <para>This distinction is important.  If you send someone an
	email talking about <quote>revision 33</quote>, there's a high
	likelihood that their revision 33 will <emphasis>not be the
	  same</emphasis> as yours.  The reason for this is that a
	revision number depends on the order in which changes arrived
	in a repository, and there is no guarantee that the same
	changes will happen in the same order in different
	repositories. Three changes $a,b,c$ can easily appear in one
	repository as $0,1,2$, while in another as $1,0,2$.</para>

      <para>Mercurial uses revision numbers purely as a convenient
	shorthand.  If you need to discuss a changeset with someone,
	or make a record of a changeset for some other reason (for
	example, in a bug report), use the hexadecimal
	identifier.</para>

    </sect2>
    <sect2>
      <title>Viewing specific revisions</title>

      <para>To narrow the output of <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	  log</command> down to a single revision, use the <option
	  role="hg-opt-log">-r</option> (or <option
	  role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option>) option.  You can use
	either a revision number or a long-form changeset identifier,
	and you can provide as many revisions as you want.</para>

      &interaction.tour.log-r;

      <para>If you want to see the history of several revisions
	without having to list each one, you can use <emphasis>range
	  notation</emphasis>; this lets you express the idea <quote>I
	  want all revisions between <literal>abc</literal> and
	  <literal>def</literal>, inclusive</quote>.</para>
      
	&interaction.tour.log.range;

      <para>Mercurial also honours the order in which you specify
	revisions, so <command role="hg-cmd">hg log -r 2:4</command>
	prints 2, 3, and 4. while <command role="hg-cmd">hg log -r
	  4:2</command> prints 4, 3, and 2.</para>

    </sect2>
    <sect2>
      <title>More detailed information</title>

      <para>While the summary information printed by <command
	  role="hg-cmd">hg log</command> is useful if you already know
	what you're looking for, you may need to see a complete
	description of the change, or a list of the files changed, if
	you're trying to decide whether a changeset is the one you're
	looking for. The <command role="hg-cmd">hg log</command>
	command's <option role="hg-opt-global">-v</option> (or <option
	  role="hg-opt-global">--verbose</option>) option gives you
	this extra detail.</para>

      &interaction.tour.log-v;

      <para>If you want to see both the description and content of a
	change, add the <option role="hg-opt-log">-p</option> (or
	<option role="hg-opt-log">--patch</option>) option.  This
	displays the content of a change as a <emphasis>unified
	  diff</emphasis> (if you've never seen a unified diff before,
	see section <xref linkend="sec.mq.patch"/> for an
	overview).</para>

      &interaction.tour.log-vp;

    </sect2>
  </sect1>
  <sect1>
    <title>All about command options</title>

    <para>Let's take a brief break from exploring Mercurial commands
      to discuss a pattern in the way that they work; you may find
      this useful to keep in mind as we continue our tour.</para>

    <para>Mercurial has a consistent and straightforward approach to
      dealing with the options that you can pass to commands.  It
      follows the conventions for options that are common to modern
      Linux and Unix systems.</para>
    <itemizedlist>
      <listitem><para>Every option has a long name.  For example, as
	  we've already seen, the <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	    log</command> command accepts a <option
	    role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option> option.</para></listitem>
      <listitem><para>Most options have short names, too.  Instead of
	  <option role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option>, we can use <option
	    role="hg-opt-log">-r</option>.  (The reason that some
	  options don't have short names is that the options in
	  question are rarely used.)</para></listitem>
      <listitem><para>Long options start with two dashes (e.g. <option
	    role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option>), while short options
	  start with one (e.g. <option
	    role="hg-opt-log">-r</option>).</para></listitem>
      <listitem><para>Option naming and usage is consistent across
	  commands.  For example, every command that lets you specify
	  a changeset ID or revision number accepts both <option
	    role="hg-opt-log">-r</option> and <option
	    role="hg-opt-log">--rev</option>
	  arguments.</para></listitem></itemizedlist>
    <para>In the examples throughout this book, I use short options
      instead of long.  This just reflects my own preference, so don't
      read anything significant into it.</para>

    <para>Most commands that print output of some kind will print more
      output when passed a <option role="hg-opt-global">-v</option>
      (or <option role="hg-opt-global">--verbose</option>) option, and
      less when passed <option role="hg-opt-global">-q</option> (or
      <option role="hg-opt-global">--quiet</option>).</para>

  </sect1>
  <sect1>
    <title>Making and reviewing changes</title>

    <para>Now that we have a grasp of viewing history in Mercurial,
      let's take a look at making some changes and examining
      them.</para>

    <para>The first thing we'll do is isolate our experiment in a
      repository of its own.  We use the <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	clone</command> command, but we don't need to clone a copy of
      the remote repository.  Since we already have a copy of it
      locally, we can just clone that instead.  This is much faster
      than cloning over the network, and cloning a local repository
      uses less disk space in most cases, too.</para>

    &interaction.tour.reclone;

    <para>As an aside, it's often good practice to keep a
      <quote>pristine</quote> copy of a remote repository around,
      which you can then make temporary clones of to create sandboxes
      for each task you want to work on.  This lets you work on
      multiple tasks in parallel, each isolated from the others until
      it's complete and you're ready to integrate it back.  Because
      local clones are so cheap, there's almost no overhead to cloning
      and destroying repositories whenever you want.</para>

    <para>In our <filename class="directory">my-hello</filename>
      repository, we have a file <filename>hello.c</filename> that
      contains the classic <quote>hello, world</quote> program. Let's
      use the ancient and venerable <command>sed</command> command to
      edit this file so that it prints a second line of output.  (I'm
      only using <command>sed</command> to do this because it's easy
      to write a scripted example this way.  Since you're not under
      the same constraint, you probably won't want to use
      <command>sed</command>; simply use your preferred text editor to
      do the same thing.)</para>

    &interaction.tour.sed;

    <para>Mercurial's <command role="hg-cmd">hg status</command>
      command will tell us what Mercurial knows about the files in the
      repository.</para>

    &interaction.tour.status;

    <para>The <command role="hg-cmd">hg status</command> command
      prints no output for some files, but a line starting with
      <quote><literal>M</literal></quote> for
      <filename>hello.c</filename>.  Unless you tell it to, <command
	role="hg-cmd">hg status</command> will not print any output
      for files that have not been modified.</para>

    <para>The <quote><literal>M</literal></quote> indicates that
      Mercurial has noticed that we modified
      <filename>hello.c</filename>.  We didn't need to
      <emphasis>inform</emphasis> Mercurial that we were going to
      modify the file before we started, or that we had modified the
      file after we were done; it was able to figure this out
      itself.</para>

    <para>It's a little bit helpful to know that we've modified
      <filename>hello.c</filename>, but we might prefer to know
      exactly <emphasis>what</emphasis> changes we've made to it.  To
      do this, we use the <command role="hg-cmd">hg diff</command>
      command.</para>

    &interaction.tour.diff;

  </sect1>
  <sect1>
    <title>Recording changes in a new changeset</title>

    <para>We can modify files, build and test our changes, and use
      <command role="hg-cmd">hg status</command> and <command
	role="hg-cmd">hg diff</command> to review our changes, until
      we're satisfied with what we've done and arrive at a natural
      stopping point where we want to record our work in a new
      changeset.</para>

    <para>The <command role="hg-cmd">hg commit</command> command lets
      us create a new changeset; we'll usually refer to this as
      <quote>making a commit</quote> or
      <quote>committing</quote>.</para>

    <sect2>
      <title>Setting up a username</title>

      <para>When you try to run <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	  commit</command> for the first time, it is not guaranteed to
	succeed.  Mercurial records your name and address with each
	change that you commit, so that you and others will later be
	able to tell who made each change.  Mercurial tries to
	automatically figure out a sensible username to commit the
	change with.  It will attempt each of the following methods,
	in order:</para>
      <orderedlist>
	<listitem><para>If you specify a <option
	      role="hg-opt-commit">-u</option> option to the <command
	      role="hg-cmd">hg commit</command> command on the command
	    line, followed by a username, this is always given the
	    highest precedence.</para></listitem>
	<listitem><para>If you have set the <envar>HGUSER</envar>
	    environment variable, this is checked
	    next.</para></listitem>
	<listitem><para>If you create a file in your home directory
	    called <filename role="special">.hgrc</filename>, with a
	    <envar role="rc-item-ui">username</envar> entry, that will
	    be used next.  To see what the contents of this file
	    should look like, refer to section <xref
	      linkend="sec.tour-basic.username"/>
	    below.</para></listitem>
	<listitem><para>If you have set the <envar>EMAIL</envar>
	    environment variable, this will be used
	    next.</para></listitem>
	<listitem><para>Mercurial will query your system to find out
	    your local user name and host name, and construct a
	    username from these components. Since this often results
	    in a username that is not very useful, it will print a
	    warning if it has to do
	    this.</para></listitem>
      </orderedlist>
      <para>If all of these mechanisms fail, Mercurial will
	  fail, printing an error message.  In this case, it will not
	  let you commit until you set up a
	  username.</para>
      <para>You should think of the <envar>HGUSER</envar> environment
	variable and the <option role="hg-opt-commit">-u</option>
	option to the <command role="hg-cmd">hg commit</command>
	command as ways to <emphasis>override</emphasis> Mercurial's
	default selection of username.  For normal use, the simplest
	and most robust way to set a username for yourself is by
	creating a <filename role="special">.hgrc</filename> file; see
	below for details.</para>
      <sect3 id="sec.tour-basic.username">
	<title>Creating a Mercurial configuration file</title>

	<para>To set a user name, use your favourite editor
	    to create a file called <filename
	      role="special">.hgrc</filename> in your home directory.
	    Mercurial will use this file to look up your personalised
	    configuration settings.  The initial contents of your
	    <filename role="special">.hgrc</filename> should look like
	    this.</para>
	<programlisting># This is a Mercurial configuration file.
[ui] username = Firstname Lastname
&lt;email.address@domain.net&gt;</programlisting>

	<para>The <quote><literal>[ui]</literal></quote> line begins a
	  <emphasis>section</emphasis> of the config file, so you can
	  read the <quote><literal>username = ...</literal></quote>
	  line as meaning <quote>set the value of the
	    <literal>username</literal> item in the
	    <literal>ui</literal> section</quote>. A section continues
	  until a new section begins, or the end of the file.
	  Mercurial ignores empty lines and treats any text from
	  <quote><literal>#</literal></quote> to the end of a line as
	  a comment.</para>
      </sect3>

      <sect3>
	<title>Choosing a user name</title>

	<para>You can use any text you like as the value of
	    the <literal>username</literal> config item, since this
	    information is for reading by other people, but for
	    interpreting by Mercurial.  The convention that most
	    people follow is to use their name and email address, as
	    in the example above.</para>
	<note>
	  <para>Mercurial's built-in web server obfuscates
	      email addresses, to make it more difficult for the email
	      harvesting tools that spammers use. This reduces the
	      likelihood that you'll start receiving more junk email
	      if you publish a Mercurial repository on the
	      web.</para></note>

      </sect3>
    </sect2>
    <sect2>
      <title>Writing a commit message</title>

      <para>When we commit a change, Mercurial drops us into
	  a text editor, to enter a message that will describe the
	  modifications we've made in this changeset.  This is called
	  the <emphasis>commit message</emphasis>.  It will be a
	  record for readers of what we did and why, and it will be
	  printed by <command role="hg-cmd">hg log</command> after
	  we've finished committing.</para>

       &interaction.tour.commit;

      <para>The editor that the <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	    commit</command> command drops us into will contain an
	  empty line, followed by a number of lines starting with
	  <quote><literal>HG:</literal></quote>.</para>

    <programlisting>XXX fix this XXX</programlisting>

      <para>Mercurial ignores the lines that start with
	  <quote><literal>HG:</literal></quote>; it uses them only to
	  tell us which files it's recording changes to.  Modifying or
	  deleting these lines has no effect.</para>
    </sect2>
    <sect2>
      <title>Writing a good commit message</title>

      <para>Since <command role="hg-cmd">hg log</command>
	  only prints the first line of a commit message by default,
	  it's best to write a commit message whose first line stands
	  alone.  Here's a real example of a commit message that
	  <emphasis>doesn't</emphasis> follow this guideline, and
	  hence has a summary that is not
	  readable.</para>

      <programlisting>
changeset:   73:584af0e231be
user: Censored Person &lt;censored.person@example.org&gt;
date: Tue Sep 26 21:37:07 2006 -0700
summary:     include buildmeister/commondefs. Add exports.</programlisting>

      <para>As far as the remainder of the contents of the
	  commit message are concerned, there are no hard-and-fast
	  rules.  Mercurial itself doesn't interpret or care about the
	  contents of the commit message, though your project may have
	  policies that dictate a certain kind of
	  formatting.</para>
      <para>My personal preference is for short, but
	  informative, commit messages that tell me something that I
	  can't figure out with a quick glance at the output of
	  <command role="hg-cmd">hg log
	    --patch</command>.</para>
    </sect2>
    <sect2>
      <title>Aborting a commit</title>

      <para>If you decide that you don't want to commit
	  while in the middle of editing a commit message, simply exit
	  from your editor without saving the file that it's editing.
	  This will cause nothing to happen to either the repository
	  or the working directory.</para>
      <para>If we run the <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	    commit</command> command without any arguments, it records
	  all of the changes we've made, as reported by <command
	    role="hg-cmd">hg status</command> and <command
	    role="hg-cmd">hg diff</command>.</para>
    </sect2>
    <sect2>
      <title>Admiring our new handiwork</title>

      <para>Once we've finished the commit, we can use the
	  <command role="hg-cmd">hg tip</command> command to display
	  the changeset we just created.  This command produces output
	  that is identical to <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	    log</command>, but it only displays the newest revision in
	  the repository.</para>

      &interaction.tour.tip;

      <para>We refer to
	  the newest revision in the repository as the tip revision,
	  or simply the tip.</para>
    </sect2>
  </sect1>

  <sect1>
    <title>Sharing changes</title>

    <para>We mentioned earlier that repositories in
	Mercurial are self-contained.  This means that the changeset
	we just created exists only in our <filename
	  class="directory">my-hello</filename> repository.  Let's
	look at a few ways that we can propagate this change into
	other repositories.</para>

    <sect2 id="sec.tour.pull">
      <title>Pulling changes from another repository</title>
      <para>To get started, let's clone our original
	  <filename class="directory">hello</filename> repository,
	  which does not contain the change we just committed.  We'll
	  call our temporary repository <filename
	    class="directory">hello-pull</filename>.</para>

      &interaction.tour.clone-pull;

      <para>We'll use the <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	    pull</command> command to bring changes from <filename
	    class="directory">my-hello</filename> into <filename
	    class="directory">hello-pull</filename>.  However, blindly
	  pulling unknown changes into a repository is a somewhat
	  scary prospect.  Mercurial provides the <command
	    role="hg-cmd">hg incoming</command> command to tell us
	  what changes the <command role="hg-cmd">hg pull</command>
	  command <emphasis>would</emphasis> pull into the repository,
	  without actually pulling the changes in.</para>

      &interaction.tour.incoming;

      <para>(Of course, someone could
	  cause more changesets to appear in the repository that we
	  ran <command role="hg-cmd">hg incoming</command> in, before
	  we get a chance to <command role="hg-cmd">hg pull</command>
	  the changes, so that we could end up pulling changes that we
	  didn't expect.)</para>

      <para>Bringing changes into a repository is a simple
	  matter of running the <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	    pull</command> command, and telling it which repository to
	  pull from.</para>

      &interaction.tour.pull;

      <para>As you can see
	  from the before-and-after output of <command
	    role="hg-cmd">hg tip</command>, we have successfully
	  pulled changes into our repository.  There remains one step
	  before we can see these changes in the working
	  directory.</para>
    </sect2>
    <sect2>
      <title>Updating the working directory</title>

      <para>We have so far glossed over the relationship between a
	repository and its working directory.  The <command
	  role="hg-cmd">hg pull</command> command that we ran in
	section <xref linkend="sec.tour.pull"/> brought changes
	into the repository, but if we check, there's no sign of those
	changes in the working directory.  This is because <command
	  role="hg-cmd">hg pull</command> does not (by default) touch
	the working directory.  Instead, we use the <command
	  role="hg-cmd">hg update</command> command to do this.</para>

      &interaction.tour.update;

      <para>It might seem a bit strange that <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	  pull</command> doesn't update the working directory
	automatically.  There's actually a good reason for this: you
	can use <command role="hg-cmd">hg update</command> to update
	the working directory to the state it was in at <emphasis>any
	  revision</emphasis> in the history of the repository.  If
	you had the working directory updated to an old revision---to
	hunt down the origin of a bug, say---and ran a <command
	  role="hg-cmd">hg pull</command> which automatically updated
	the working directory to a new revision, you might not be
	terribly happy.</para>
      <para>However, since pull-then-update is such a common thing to
	do, Mercurial lets you combine the two by passing the <option
	  role="hg-opt-pull">-u</option> option to <command
	  role="hg-cmd">hg pull</command>.</para>

      <para>If you look back at the output of <command
	  role="hg-cmd">hg pull</command> in section <xref
	    linkend="sec.tour.pull"/> when we ran it without <option
	  role="hg-opt-pull">-u</option>, you can see that it printed
	a helpful reminder that we'd have to take an explicit step to
	update the working directory:</para>

      <!-- &interaction.xxx.fixme; -->

      <para>To find out what revision the working directory is at, use
	the <command role="hg-cmd">hg parents</command>
	command.</para>

      &interaction.tour.parents;

      <para>If you look back at figure <xref
	   endterm="fig.tour-basic.history.caption" 
	   linkend="fig.tour-basic.history"/>,
	you'll see arrows connecting each changeset.  The node that
	the arrow leads <emphasis>from</emphasis> in each case is a
	parent, and the node that the arrow leads
	<emphasis>to</emphasis> is its child.  The working directory
	has a parent in just the same way; this is the changeset that
	the working directory currently contains.</para>

      <para>To update the working directory to a particular revision,

	give a revision number or changeset ID to the <command
	  role="hg-cmd">hg update</command> command.</para>

      &interaction.tour.older;

      <para>If you omit an explicit revision, <command
	  role="hg-cmd">hg update</command> will update to the tip
	revision, as shown by the second call to <command
	  role="hg-cmd">hg update</command> in the example
	above.</para>
    </sect2>

    <sect2>
      <title>Pushing changes to another repository</title>

      <para>Mercurial lets us push changes to another
	  repository, from the repository we're currently visiting.
	  As with the example of <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	    pull</command> above, we'll create a temporary repository
	  to push our changes into.</para>

      &interaction.tour.clone-push;

      <para>The <command role="hg-cmd">hg outgoing</command> command
	  tells us what changes would be pushed into another
	  repository.</para>

      &interaction.tour.outgoing;

      <para>And the
	  <command role="hg-cmd">hg push</command> command does the
	  actual push.</para>

      &interaction.tour.push;

      <para>As with
	  <command role="hg-cmd">hg pull</command>, the <command
	    role="hg-cmd">hg push</command> command does not update
	  the working directory in the repository that it's pushing
	  changes into. (Unlike <command role="hg-cmd">hg
	    pull</command>, <command role="hg-cmd">hg push</command>
	  does not provide a <literal>-u</literal> option that updates
	  the other repository's working directory.)</para>

      <para>What happens if we try to pull or push changes
	  and the receiving repository already has those changes?
	  Nothing too exciting.</para>

      &interaction.tour.push.nothing;
    </sect2>
    <sect2>
      <title>Sharing changes over a network</title>

      <para>The commands we have covered in the previous few
	  sections are not limited to working with local repositories.
	  Each works in exactly the same fashion over a network
	  connection; simply pass in a URL instead of a local
	  path.</para>
	
      &interaction.tour.outgoing.net;

      <para>In this example, we
	  can see what changes we could push to the remote repository,
	  but the repository is understandably not set up to let
	  anonymous users push to it.</para>

      &interaction.tour.push.net;
    </sect2>
  </sect1>
</chapter>

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Tip: Filter by extension type e.g. /repo .js to search for all .js files in the /repo directory.
Tip: Separate your search with spaces e.g. /ssh pom.xml to search for src/ssh/pom.xml.
Tip: Use ↑ and ↓ arrow keys to navigate and return to view the file.
Tip: You can also navigate files with Ctrl+j (next) and Ctrl+k (previous) and view the file with Ctrl+o.
Tip: You can also navigate files with Alt+j (next) and Alt+k (previous) and view the file with Alt+o.