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guillermooo  committed b7ccb42

installpackages.rst (packaging): Minor changes to how-to compile closing sections.

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File Doc/packaging/enduser/installpackages.rst

 
 Obviously, specifying the entire installation scheme every time you install a
 new module distribution would be very tedious. To spare you all that work, you
-can store it in a Packaging config file instead (see section
+can store it in a Packaging configuration file instead (see section
 :ref:`packaging-config-files`), like so::
 
    [install]
 You may have noticed the use of ``$HOME`` and ``$PLAT`` in the sample
 configuration file. These are Packaging configuration variables, which
 bear a strong resemblance to environment variables. In fact, you can use
-environment variables in config files on platforms that have such a notion, but
+environment variables in configuration files on platforms that have such a notion, but
 Packaging additionally defines a few extra variables that may not be in your
 environment, such as ``$PLAT``. Of course, on systems that don't have
 environment variables, such as Mac OS 9, the configuration variables supplied by
 
 .. _packaging-config-filenames:
 
-Location and names of config files
-----------------------------------
+Location and names of configuration files
+-----------------------------------------
 
 The name and location of the configuration files vary slightly across
 platforms. On Unix and Mac OS X, these are the three configuration files listed
 format (OMF) is different from the format used by the Python version you can
 download from the Python or ActiveState Web site. (Python is built with
 Microsoft Visual C++, which uses COFF as the object file format.) For this
-reason you have to convert Python's library :file:`python25.lib` into the
+reason, you have to convert Python's library :file:`python25.lib` into the
 Borland format. You can do this as follows:
 
 .. Should we mention that users have to create cfg-files for the compiler?
 uses this library. In the case it doesn't find such a special library it uses
 the default name (:file:`foo.lib`.) [#]_
 
-To let Packaging compile your extension with Borland C++ you now have to type::
+To let Packaging compile your extension with Borland, C++ you now have to
+type::
 
    python setup.py build --compiler bcpp
 
 most likely to not work are those that use C++ or depend on Microsoft Visual C
 extensions.
 
-To let Packaging compile your extension with Cygwin you have to type::
+To let Packaging compile your extension with Cygwin, you have to type::
 
    python setup.py build --compiler=cygwin
 
-and for Cygwin in no-cygwin mode [#]_ or for MinGW type::
+and for Cygwin in no-cygwin mode [#]_ or for MinGW, type::
 
    python setup.py build --compiler=mingw32
 
 """"""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""
 The following instructions only apply if you're using a version of Python
 inferior to 2.4.1 with a MinGW inferior to 3.0.0 (with
-binutils-2.13.90-20030111-1).
+:file:`binutils-2.13.90-20030111-1`).
 
 These compilers require some special libraries. This task is more complex than
 for Borland's C++, because there is no program to convert the library. First
    OMF-libraries of the same name.
 
 .. [#] Check http://sources.redhat.com/cygwin/ and http://www.mingw.org/ for
-   more information
+   more information.
 
 .. [#] Then you have no POSIX emulation available, but you also don't need
    :file:`cygwin1.dll`.