Source

pygame / test / threads_test.py

#################################### IMPORTS ###################################

import test_utils, unittest
from test_utils import test_not_implemented

from pygame.threads import FuncResult, tmap, WorkerQueue

################################################################################

class WorkerQueueTypeTest(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_do(self):

        # __doc__ (as of 2008-06-28) for pygame.threads.WorkerQueue.do:

          # puts a function on a queue for running later.
          #         

        self.assert_(test_not_implemented()) 

    def test_stop(self):

        # __doc__ (as of 2008-06-28) for pygame.threads.WorkerQueue.stop:

          # Stops the WorkerQueue, waits for all of the threads to finish up.
          #         

        self.assert_(test_not_implemented()) 

    def test_threadloop(self):

        # __doc__ (as of 2008-06-28) for pygame.threads.WorkerQueue.threadloop:

          # Loops until all of the tasks are finished.
          #         

        self.assert_(test_not_implemented()) 

    def test_wait(self):

        # __doc__ (as of 2008-06-28) for pygame.threads.WorkerQueue.wait:

          # waits until all tasks are complete.
          #         

        self.assert_(test_not_implemented()) 

class ThreadsModuleTest(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_benchmark_workers(self):

        # __doc__ (as of 2008-06-28) for pygame.threads.benchmark_workers:

          # does a little test to see if workers are at all faster.
          # Returns the number of workers which works best.
          # Takes a little bit of time to run, so you should only really call
          #   it once.
          # You can pass in benchmark data, and functions if you want.
          # a_bench_func - f(data)
          # the_data - data to work on.

        self.assert_(test_not_implemented()) 

    def test_init(self):

        # __doc__ (as of 2008-06-28) for pygame.threads.init:

          # Does a little test to see if threading is worth it.
          #   Sets up a global worker queue if it's worth it.
          # 
          # Calling init() is not required, but is generally better to do.

        self.assert_(test_not_implemented()) 

    def test_quit(self):

        # __doc__ (as of 2008-06-28) for pygame.threads.quit:

          # cleans up everything.
          #     

        self.assert_(test_not_implemented()) 

    def test_tmap(self):

        # __doc__ (as of 2008-06-28) for pygame.threads.tmap:

          # like map, but uses a thread pool to execute.
          # num_workers - the number of worker threads that will be used.  If pool
          #                 is passed in, then the num_workers arg is ignored.
          # worker_queue - you can optionally pass in an existing WorkerQueue.
          # wait - True means that the results are returned when everything is finished.
          #        False means that we return the [worker_queue, results] right away instead. 
          #        results, is returned as a list of FuncResult instances.
          # stop_on_error -

        func, data = lambda x:x+1, xrange(100)

        tmapped = tmap(func, data)
        mapped = map(func, data)

        self.assert_(tmapped == mapped)
        
    def test_tmap__None_func_and_multiple_sequences(self):
        """ Using a None as func and multiple seqences """

        res =  tmap(None, [1,2,3,4])

        res2 = tmap(None, [1,2,3,4], [22, 33, 44, 55])
        
        res3 = tmap(None, [1,2,3,4], [22, 33, 44, 55, 66])
        
        res4 = tmap(None, [1,2,3,4,5], [22, 33, 44, 55])
        
        self.assertEqual([1, 2, 3, 4], res)
        self.assertEqual([(1, 22), (2, 33), (3, 44), (4, 55)], res2)
        self.assertEqual([(1, 22), (2, 33), (3, 44), (4, 55), (None, 66)], res3)
        self.assertEqual([(1, 22), (2, 33), (3, 44), (4, 55), (5,None)], res4)
        
    def test_tmap__wait(self):
        r = range(1000)
        wq, results = tmap(lambda x:x, r, num_workers = 5, wait=False)
        wq.wait()
        r2 = map(lambda x:x.result, results)
        self.assert_(r == r2)

    def test_FuncResult(self):
        
        # as of 2008-06-28
        # FuncResult(f, callback = None, errback = None)
        
        # Used for wrapping up a function call so that the results are stored
        #      inside the instances result attribute.
        
        
        #     f - is the function we that we call 
        #         callback(result) - this is called when the function(f) returns
        #         errback(exception) - this is called when the function(f) raises
        #                                an exception.

        # Results are stored in result attribute
        fr = FuncResult(lambda x:x+1)
        fr(2)
        self.assert_(fr.result == 3)
        
        # Exceptions are store in exception attribute
        self.assert_(fr.exception is None,  "when no exception raised")
        
        exception = ValueError('rast')
        def x(sdf):
            raise exception
        fr = FuncResult(x)
        fr(None)
        self.assert_(fr.exception is exception)

################################################################################

if __name__ == '__main__':
    test_utils.get_fail_incomplete_tests_option()
    unittest.main()