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Fred Drake committed 95142c8

Typo: (and often severly limited) -- severely
Typo: (but not to the tuple or list into which the item it put!) -- is put

Thanks, AMK!

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 \label{refcounts}
 
 The reference count is important because today's computers have a 
-finite (and often severly limited) memory size; it counts how many 
+finite (and often severely limited) memory size; it counts how many 
 different places there are that have a reference to an object.  Such a 
 place could be another object, or a global (or static) \C{} variable, or 
 a local variable in some \C{} function.  When an object's reference count 
 references; the two notable exceptions are
 \cfunction{PyList_SetItem()} and \cfunction{PyTuple_SetItem()}, which
 steal a reference to the item (but not to the tuple or list into which
-the item it put!).  These functions were designed to steal a reference
+the item is put!).  These functions were designed to steal a reference
 because of a common idiom for populating a tuple or list with newly
 created objects; for example, the code to create the tuple \code{(1,
 2, "three")} could look like this (forgetting about error handling for

File Doc/api/api.tex

 \label{refcounts}
 
 The reference count is important because today's computers have a 
-finite (and often severly limited) memory size; it counts how many 
+finite (and often severely limited) memory size; it counts how many 
 different places there are that have a reference to an object.  Such a 
 place could be another object, or a global (or static) \C{} variable, or 
 a local variable in some \C{} function.  When an object's reference count 
 references; the two notable exceptions are
 \cfunction{PyList_SetItem()} and \cfunction{PyTuple_SetItem()}, which
 steal a reference to the item (but not to the tuple or list into which
-the item it put!).  These functions were designed to steal a reference
+the item is put!).  These functions were designed to steal a reference
 because of a common idiom for populating a tuple or list with newly
 created objects; for example, the code to create the tuple \code{(1,
 2, "three")} could look like this (forgetting about error handling for