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Chris Jerdonek committed 95f7481 Draft

Undo changes accidentally reverted in de8787029fe4.

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Doc/howto/functional.rst

 Applying :func:`iter` to a dictionary always loops over the keys, but
 dictionaries have methods that return other iterators.  If you want to iterate
 over values or key/value pairs, you can explicitly call the
-:meth:`~dict.values` or :meth:`~dict.items` methods to get an appropriate iterator.
+:meth:`~dict.values` or :meth:`~dict.items` methods to get an appropriate
+iterator.
 
 The :func:`dict` constructor can accept an iterator that returns a finite stream
 of ``(key, value)`` tuples:
 
     >>> L = [('Italy', 'Rome'), ('France', 'Paris'), ('US', 'Washington DC')]
-    >>> dict(iter(L))
+    >>> dict(iter(L))  #doctest: +SKIP
     {'Italy': 'Rome', 'US': 'Washington DC', 'France': 'Paris'}
 
 Files also support iteration by calling the :meth:`~io.TextIOBase.readline`

Doc/library/functions.rst

 
    Without an argument, an array of size 0 is created.
 
+   See also :ref:`binaryseq` and :ref:`typebytearray`.
+
 
 .. _func-bytes:
 .. function:: bytes([source[, encoding[, errors]]])
 
    Bytes objects can also be created with literals, see :ref:`strings`.
 
+   See also :ref:`binaryseq`, :ref:`typebytes`, and :ref:`bytes-methods`.
+
 
 .. function:: callable(object)
 
    *sentinel*, :exc:`StopIteration` will be raised, otherwise the value will
    be returned.
 
+   See also :ref:`typeiter`.
+
    One useful application of the second form of :func:`iter` is to read lines of
    a file until a certain line is reached.  The following example reads a file
    until the :meth:`readline` method returns an empty string::
    :noindex:
 
    Rather than being a function, :class:`list` is actually a mutable
-   sequence type, as documented in :ref:`typesseq`.
+   sequence type, as documented in :ref:`typesseq-list` and :ref:`typesseq`.
 
 
 .. function:: locals()
    :noindex:
 
    Rather than being a function, :class:`range` is actually an immutable
-   sequence type, as documented in :ref:`typesseq`.
+   sequence type, as documented in :ref:`typesseq-range` and :ref:`typesseq`.
 
 
 .. function:: repr(object)
 .. function:: str(object='')
               str(object[, encoding[, errors]])
 
-   Return a string version of an object, using one of the following modes:
+   Return a :ref:`string <textseq>` version of an object, using one of the
+   following modes:
 
    If *encoding* and/or *errors* are given, :func:`str` will decode the
    *object* which can either be a byte string or a character buffer using
    Objects can specify what ``str(object)`` returns by defining a :meth:`__str__`
    special method.
 
-   For more information on strings see :ref:`typesseq` which describes sequence
-   functionality (strings are sequences), and also the string-specific methods
-   described in the :ref:`string-methods` section. To output formatted strings,
-   see the :ref:`string-formatting` section. In addition see the
-   :ref:`stringservices` section.
+   For more information on strings and string methods, see the :ref:`textseq`
+   section.  To output formatted strings, see the :ref:`string-formatting`
+   section.  In addition, see the :ref:`stringservices` section.
 
 
 .. function:: sum(iterable[, start])
    :noindex:
 
    Rather than being a function, :class:`tuple` is actually an immutable
-   sequence type, as documented in :ref:`typesseq`.
+   sequence type, as documented in :ref:`typesseq-tuple` and :ref:`typesseq`.
 
 
 .. function:: type(object)
       ...
       >>> X = type('X', (object,), dict(a=1))
 
+   See also :ref:`bltin-type-objects`.
+
 
 .. function:: vars([object])