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Vedran Miletić committed 0eb40b9

Documentation fixes: I-->Till or I-->we.

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doc/beamerug-animations.tex

 \item
   A bug in some versions of the Acrobat Reader makes it necessary to provide very exact details on the encoding of the sound file. You have to provide the sampling rate, the number of channels (mono or stereo), the number of bits per sample, and the sample encoding method (raw, signed, Alaw or $\mu$law). If you do not know this data or provide it incorrectly, the sound will be played incorrectly.
 \item
-  It seems  that you can only include uncompressed sound data, which can easily become huge. This is not required by the specification, but I have been unable to make the Acrobat Reader play any compressed data. Data formats that \emph{do} work are |.aif| and |.au|.
+  It seems that you can only include uncompressed sound data, which can easily become huge. This is not required by the specification, but some versions of Acrobat Reader are unable to play any compressed data. Data formats that \emph{do} work are |.aif| and |.au|.
 \end{itemize}
 
 \begin{command}{\sound\oarg{options}\marg{sound poster text}\marg{sound filename}}
 
   Also as for a movie, the \meta{sound poster text} will be be put in a box that, when clicked on, will start playing the movie. However, you might also leave this box empty and only use the |autostart| option. Once playback of a sound has started, it can only be stopped by starting the playback of a different sound or by use of the |\hyperlinkmute| command.
 
-  The supported sound formats depend on the viewer application. My version of the Acrobat Reader supports |.aif| and |.au|. I also need to specify information like the sampling rate, even though this information could be extracted from the sound file and even though the \pdf\ standard specifies that the viewer application should do so. In this regard, my version of the Acrobat Reader seems to be non-standard-conforming.
+  The supported sound formats depend on the viewer application. Some versions of Acrobat Reader support |.aif| and |.au|. Sometimes you also need to specify information like the sampling rate, even though this information could be extracted from the sound file and even though the \pdf\ standard specifies that the viewer application should do so. In this regard, some versions of Acrobat Reader seems to be non-standard-conforming.
 
   This command only works together with |pdflatex|. If you use |dvips|, the poster is still shown, but clicking it has no effect and no sound is embedded in any way.
 

doc/beamerug-color.tex

 A ``complete'' color theme is a color theme that completely specifies all colors for all parts of a frame. It installs specific colors and does not derive the colors from, say, the |structure| \beamer-color. Complete color themes happen to have names of flying animals.
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{albatross}
-  The color theme is a ``dark'' or ``inverted'' theme using yellow on blue as the main colors. The color theme also installs a slightly darker background color for blocks, which is necessary for presentation themes that use shadows, but which (in my opinion) is undesirable for all other presentation themes. By using the |lily| color theme together with this theme, the backgrounds for blocks can be removed.
+  The color theme is a ``dark'' or ``inverted'' theme using yellow on blue as the main colors. The color theme also installs a slightly darker background color for blocks, which is necessary for presentation themes that use shadows, but which (in Till's opinion) is undesirable for all other presentation themes. By using the |lily| color theme together with this theme, the backgrounds for blocks can be removed.
 
   When using a light-on-dark theme like this one, be aware that there are certain disadvantages:
   \begin{itemize}
   The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
   \item
-    \declare{|overlystylish|} installs a background canvas that is, in my opinion, way too stylish. But then, I do not want to press my taste on other people. When using this option, it is probably a very good idea to also use the |lily| color theme.
+    \declare{|overlystylish|} installs a background canvas that is, in Till's opinion, way too stylish. But then, it is not his intention to press his taste on other people. When using this option, it is probably a very good idea to also use the |lily| color theme.
   \end{itemize}
 
   \example
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{seahorse}
   Installs a near-transparent backgrounds for the headline, footline, and sidebar. Using this theme will cause navigational elements to be much less ``dominant'' than when using the |whale| theme (see the discussion on contrast there, though).
 
-  It goes well with the |rose| or the |lily| color theme. Pairing it with the |orchid| overemphasizes blocks (in my opinion).
+  It goes well with the |rose| or the |lily| color theme. Pairing it with the |orchid| overemphasizes blocks (in Till's opinion).
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{dolphin}
 
 In \beamer's philosophy, every element of a presentation can have a different color. Unfortunately, it turned out that simply assigning a single color to every element of a presentation is not such a good idea. First of all, we sometimes want colors of elements to change during a presentation, like the color of the item indicators when they become alerted or inside an example block. Second, some elements naturally have two colors, namely a foreground and a background, but not always. Third, sometimes elements somehow should not have any special color but should simply ``run along'' with the color of their surrounding. Finally, giving a special color to every element makes it very hard to globally change colors (like changing all the different kind-of-blue things into kind-of-red things) and it makes later extensions even harder.
 
-For all these reasons, the color of an element in \beamer\ is a structured object, which I call a \emph{\beamer-color}. Every \beamer-color has two parts: a foreground and a background. Either of these may be ``empty,'' which means that whatever foreground or background was active before should remain active when the color is used.
+For all these reasons, the color of an element in \beamer\ is a structured object, which we call a \emph{\beamer-color}. Every \beamer-color has two parts: a foreground and a background. Either of these may be ``empty,'' which means that whatever foreground or background was active before should remain active when the color is used.
 
 \beamer-colors can \emph{inherit} from other \beamer-colors and the default themes make extensive use of this feature. For example, there is a \beamer-color called |structure| and all sorts of elements inherit from this color. Thus, if someone changes |structure|, the color of all these elements automatically change accordingly. When a color inherits from another color, it can nevertheless still override only the foreground or the background.
 
 
 \subsection{The Color of Mathematical Text}
 
-By default, mathematical text does not have any special color---it just inherits the ``surrounding'' color. Some people prefer mathematical text to have some special color. Though I do not recommend this (I think mathematical text should \emph{not} stand out amid the normal text), \beamer\ makes it (reasonably) easy to change the color of mathematical text. Simply change the following colors:
+By default, mathematical text does not have any special color---it just inherits the ``surrounding'' color. Some people prefer mathematical text to have some special color. Though we do not recommend this (we believe mathematical text should \emph{not} stand out amid the normal text), \beamer\ makes it (reasonably) easy to change the color of mathematical text. Simply change the following colors:
 
 \begin{element}{math text}\no\yes\no
   This color is the parent of |math text inlined| and |math text displayed|. It is empty by default. See those colors for details.

doc/beamerug-emulation.tex

 \item
   Add a |\usepackage{beamerprosper}| to start the emulation.
 \item
-  If you add slides relying on \textsc{ha}-\prosper, you may wish to add the option |framesassubsections| to |beamerprosper|, though I do not recommend it (use the normal |\subsection| command instead; it gives you more fine-grained control).
+  If you add slides relying on \textsc{ha}-\prosper, you may wish to add the option |framesassubsections| to |beamerprosper|, though we do not recommend it (use the normal |\subsection| command instead; it gives you more fine-grained control).
 \item
   If you also copy the title commands, it may be necessary to adjust the content of commands like |\title| or |\author|. Note that in \prosper\ the |\email| command is given outside the |\author| command, whereas in \beamer\ and also in \textsc{ha}-\prosper\ it is given inside.
 \item
 
 The package |beamerfoils| maps a subset of the commands of the \foils\ package to \beamer. Since this package defines only few non-standard \TeX\ commands and since \beamer\ implements all the standard commands, the emulation layer is pretty simple.
 
-A copyright notice: The Foil\TeX\ package has a restricted license. For this reason, no example from the \foils\ package is included in the \beamer\ class. The emulation itself does not use the code of the \foils\ package (rather, it just maps \foils\ commands to \beamer\ commands). For this reason, my understanding is that the \emph{emulation} offered by the \beamer\ class is ``free'' and legally so. IBM has a copyright on the \foils\ class, not on the effect the commands of this class have. (At least, that's my understanding of things.)
+A copyright notice: The Foil\TeX\ package has a restricted license. For this reason, no example from the \foils\ package is included in the \beamer\ class. The emulation itself does not use the code of the \foils\ package (rather, it just maps \foils\ commands to \beamer\ commands). For this reason, our understanding is that the \emph{emulation} offered by the \beamer\ class is ``free'' and legally so. IBM has a copyright on the \foils\ class, not on the effect the commands of this class have. (At least, that's our understanding of things.)
 
 The workflow for the migration is the following:
 \begin{enumerate}
 \subsection{\TeX Power}
 \label{section-texpower}
 
-The package |beamertexpower| maps a subset of the commands of the \texpower\ package, due to Stephan Lehmke, to \beamer. This subset is currently rather small, so a lot of adaptions may be necessary. Note that \texpower\ is not a full class by itself, but a package that needs another class, like |seminar| or |prosper| to do the actual typesetting. It may thus be necessary to additionally load an emulation layer for these also. Indeed, it \emph{might} be possible to directly use \texpower\ inside \beamer, but I have not tried that. Perhaps this will be possible in the future.
+The package |beamertexpower| maps a subset of the commands of the \texpower\ package, due to Stephan Lehmke, to \beamer. This subset is currently rather small, so a lot of adaptions may be necessary. Note that \texpower\ is not a full class by itself, but a package that needs another class, like |seminar| or |prosper| to do the actual typesetting. It may thus be necessary to additionally load an emulation layer for these also. Indeed, it \emph{might} be possible to directly use \texpower\ inside \beamer, but we have not tried that. Perhaps this will be possible in the future.
 
 Currently, the package |beamertexpower| mostly just maps the |\stepwise| and related commands to appropriate \beamer\ commands. The |\pause| command need not be mapped since it is directly implemented by \beamer\ anyway.
 

doc/beamerug-fonts.tex

 \end{fontthemeexample}
 
 \begin{fontthemeexample*}{professionalfonts}
-  This font theme does not really change any fonts. Rather, it \emph{suppresses} certain internal replacements performed by \beamer. If you use ``professional fonts'' (fonts that you buy and that come with a complete set of every symbol in all modes), you do not want \beamer\ to meddle with the fonts you use. \beamer\ normally replaces certain character glyphs in mathematical text by more appropriate versions. For example, \beamer\ will normally replace glyphs such that the italic characters from the main font are used for variables in mathematical text. If your professional font package takes care of this already, \beamer's meddling should be switched off. Note that \beamer's substitution is automatically turned off if one of the following packages is loaded: |arevmath|, |hvmath|, |lucidabr|, |lucimatx|, |mathpmnt|, |mathpple|, |mathtime|, |mtpro|, and |mtpro2|. If your favorite professional font package is not among these, use the |professionalfont| option (and write me an email, so that the package can be added).
+  This font theme does not really change any fonts. Rather, it \emph{suppresses} certain internal replacements performed by \beamer. If you use ``professional fonts'' (fonts that you buy and that come with a complete set of every symbol in all modes), you do not want \beamer\ to meddle with the fonts you use. \beamer\ normally replaces certain character glyphs in mathematical text by more appropriate versions. For example, \beamer\ will normally replace glyphs such that the italic characters from the main font are used for variables in mathematical text. If your professional font package takes care of this already, \beamer's meddling should be switched off. Note that \beamer's substitution is automatically turned off if one of the following packages is loaded: |arevmath|, |hvmath|, |lucidabr|, |lucimatx|, |mathpmnt|, |mathpple|, |mathtime|, |mtpro|, and |mtpro2|. If your favorite professional font package is not among these, use the |professionalfont| option (and write us an email, so that the package can be added).
 \end{fontthemeexample*}
 
 \begin{fontthemeexample}[\oarg{options}]{serif}
 
 \beamer's font mechanism is somewhat similar to \beamer's color mechanism, but not quite the same. As for colors, every \beamer\ element, like the frame titles, the document title, the footnotes, and so on has a certain \beamer-font. As for colors, on the one hand you can specify the font of each element individually; on the other hand fonts also use inheritance, thereby making it easy to globally change the fonts used for, say, ``titlelike things'' or for ``itemizelike things.''
 
-While a \beamer-color has a certain foreground and a certain background, either of which may be empty, a \beamer-font has a size, a shape, a series, and a family, each of which may be empty. The inheritance relation among \beamer-fonts is not necessarily the same as between \beamer-colors, though I have tried to match them whenever possible.
+While a \beamer-color has a certain foreground and a certain background, either of which may be empty, a \beamer-font has a size, a shape, a series, and a family, each of which may be empty. The inheritance relation among \beamer-fonts is not necessarily the same as between \beamer-colors, though we have tried to match them whenever possible.
 
 Multiple inheritance plays a more important rule for fonts than it does for colors. A font might inherit the attributes of two different fonts. If one of them specifies that the font should be, say, boldface and the other specifies that the font should be, say, large, then the child font will be both large and bold.
 

doc/beamerug-frames.tex

   Skip the rest of the current frame by clicking on it once.
 \end{itemize}
 
-I also tried making a jump to an already-visited frame jump automatically to the last slide of this frame. However, this turned out to be more confusing than helpful. With the current implementation a double-click always brings you to the end of a slide, regardless from where you ``come.''
+We also tried making a jump to an already-visited frame jump automatically to the last slide of this frame. However, this turned out to be more confusing than helpful. With the current implementation a double-click always brings you to the end of a slide, regardless from where you ``come.''
 
 \begin{element}{mini frames}\semiyes\no\no
   This parent template has the children |mini frame| and |mini frame in current subsection|.

doc/beamerug-globalstructure.tex

 
 You can structure your text using the commands |\section| and |\subsection|. Unlike standard \LaTeX, these commands will not create a heading at the position where you use them. Rather, they will add an entry to the table of contents and also to the navigation bars.
 
-In order to create a line break in the table of contents (usually not a good idea), you can use the command |\breakhere|. Note that the standard command |\\| does not work (actually, I do not really know why; comments would be appreciated).
+In order to create a line break in the table of contents (usually not a good idea), you can use the command |\breakhere|. Note that the standard command |\\| does not work (actually, we do not really know why; comments would be appreciated).
 
 \begin{command}{\section\sarg{mode specification}\oarg{short section name}\marg{section name}}
   Starts a section. No heading is created. The \meta{section name} is shown in the table of contents and in the navigation bars, except if \meta{short section name} is specified. In this case, \meta{short section name} is used in the navigation bars instead. If a \meta{mode specification} is given, the command only has an effect for the specified modes.
 \begin{command}{\subsubsection\sarg{mode specification}\oarg{short subsubsection name}\marg{subsubsection name}}
   This command works the like |\subsection|. However, subsubsections are supported less well than subsections. For example, in the table of contents subsubsections are always shown with the same shading/hiding parameters as the subsection.
 
-  I \emph{strongly} discourage the use of subsubsections in presentations. If you do not use them, you will give a better presentation.
+  We \emph{strongly} discourage the use of subsubsections in presentations. If you do not use them, you will give a better presentation.
 
   \example
   |\subsubsection[Applications]{Applications to the Reduction of Pollution}|

doc/beamerug-guidelines.tex

 \section{Guidelines for Creating Presentations}
 \label{section-guidelines}
 
-In this section I sketch the guidelines that I try to stick to when I create presentations. These guidelines either arise out of experience, out of common sense, or out of recommendations by other people or books. These rules are certainly not intended as commandments that, if not followed, will result in catastrophe. The central rule of typography also applies to creating presentations: \emph{Every rule can be broken, but no rule may be ignored.}
+In this section we sketch the guidelines that we try to stick to when we create presentations. These guidelines either arise out of experience, out of common sense, or out of recommendations by other people or books. These rules are certainly not intended as commandments that, if not followed, will result in catastrophe. The central rule of typography also applies to creating presentations: \emph{Every rule can be broken, but no rule may be ignored.}
 
 
 \subsection{Structuring a Presentation}
 
 \paragraph{Numbered Theorems and Definitions.}
 
-A common way of globally structuring (math) articles and books is to use consecutively numbered definitions and theorems. Unfortunately, for presentations the situation is a bit more complicated and I would like to discourage using numbered theorems in presentations. The audience has no chance of remembering these numbers. \emph{Never} say things like ``now, by Theorem~2.5 that I showed you earlier, we have \dots'' It would be much better to refer to, say, Kummer's Theorem instead of Theorem~2.5. If Theorem~2.5 is some obscure theorem that does not have its own name (unlike Kummer's Theorem or Main Theorem or Second Main Theorem or Key Lemma), then the audience will have forgotten about it anyway by the time you refer to it again.
+A common way of globally structuring (math) articles and books is to use consecutively numbered definitions and theorems. Unfortunately, for presentations the situation is a bit more complicated and we would like to discourage using numbered theorems in presentations. The audience has no chance of remembering these numbers. \emph{Never} say things like ``now, by Theorem~2.5 that I showed you earlier, we have \dots'' It would be much better to refer to, say, Kummer's Theorem instead of Theorem~2.5. If Theorem~2.5 is some obscure theorem that does not have its own name (unlike Kummer's Theorem or Main Theorem or Second Main Theorem or Key Lemma), then the audience will have forgotten about it anyway by the time you refer to it again.
 
-In my opinion, the only situation in which numbered theorems make sense in a presentation is in a lecture, in which the students can read lecture notes in parallel to the lecture where the theorems are numbered in exactly the same way.
+In our opinion, the only situation in which numbered theorems make sense in a presentation is in a lecture, in which the students can read lecture notes in parallel to the lecture where the theorems are numbered in exactly the same way.
 
-If you do number theorems and definition, number everything consecutively. Thus if there are one theorem, one lemma, and one definition, you would have Theorem~1, Lemma~2, and Definition~3. Some people prefer all three to be numbered~1. I would \emph{strongly} like to discourage this. The problem is that this makes it virtually impossible to find anything since Theorem~2 might come after Definition~10 or the other way round. Papers and, worse, books that have a Theorem~1 and a Definition~1 are a pain.
+If you do number theorems and definition, number everything consecutively. Thus if there are one theorem, one lemma, and one definition, you would have Theorem~1, Lemma~2, and Definition~3. Some people prefer all three to be numbered~1. We would \emph{strongly} like to discourage this. The problem is that this makes it virtually impossible to find anything since Theorem~2 might come after Definition~10 or the other way round. Papers and, worse, books that have a Theorem~1 and a Definition~1 are a pain.
 \begin{itemize}
 \item
   Do not inflict pain on other people.
 \item
   Using the |\cite| commands can be confusing since the audience has little chance of remembering the citations. If you cite the references, always cite them with full author name and year like ``[Tantau, 2003]'' instead of something like ``[2,4]'' or ``[Tan01,NT02]''.
 \item
-  If you want to be modest, you can abbreviate your name when citing yourself as in ``[Nickelsen and T., 2003]'' or ``[Nickelsen and T, 2003]''. However, this can be confusing for the audience since it is often not immediately clear who exactly ``T.'' might be. I recommend using the full name.
+  If you want to be modest, you can abbreviate your name when citing yourself as in ``[Nickelsen and T., 2003]'' or ``[Nickelsen and T, 2003]''. However, this can be confusing for the audience since it is often not immediately clear who exactly ``T.'' might be. We recommend using the full name.
 \end{itemize}
 
 \subsubsection{Frame Structure}
 \item
   Lance Fortnow, a professor of computer science, claims: PowerPoint users give better talks. His reason: Since PowerPoint is so bad at typesetting math, they use less math, making their talks easier to understand.
 
-  There is some truth in this in my opinion. The great math-typesetting capabilities of \TeX\ can easily lure you into using many more formulas than is necessary and healthy. For example, instead of writing {\catcode `|=12``Since $\left|\{x \in \{0,1\}^* \mid x \sqsubseteq y\}\right| < \infty$}, we have\dots''\ use ``Since $y$ has only finitely many prefixes, we have\dots''
+  There is some truth in this in our opinion. The great math-typesetting capabilities of \TeX\ can easily lure you into using many more formulas than is necessary and healthy. For example, instead of writing {\catcode `|=12``Since $\left|\{x \in \{0,1\}^* \mid x \sqsubseteq y\}\right| < \infty$}, we have\dots''\ use ``Since $y$ has only finitely many prefixes, we have\dots''
 
   You will be surprised how much mathematical text can be reformulated in plain English or can just be omitted. Naturally, if some mathematical argument is what you are actually talking about, as in a math lecture, make use of \TeX's typesetting capabilities to your heart's content.
 \end{itemize}
 \item
   Latin Modern is a Computer Modern derivate that provides more characters, so it's not considered a real alternative. It's recommended over Computer Modern, though.
 \item
-  Helvetica is an often used alternative. However, Helvetica also tends to look boring (since we see it everywhere) and it has a very large x-height (the height of the letter~x in comparison to a letter like~M). A large x-height is usually considered good for languages (like English) that use uppercase letters seldom and not-so-good for languages (like German) that use uppercase letters a lot. (I have never been quite convinced by the argument for this, though.) Be warned: the x-height of Helvetica is so different from the x-height of Times that mixing the two in a single line looks strange. The packages for loading Times and Helvetica provide options for fixing this, though.
+  Helvetica is an often used alternative. However, Helvetica also tends to look boring (since we see it everywhere) and it has a very large x-height (the height of the letter~x in comparison to a letter like~M). A large x-height is usually considered good for languages (like English) that use uppercase letters seldom and not-so-good for languages (like German) that use uppercase letters a lot. (We have never been quite convinced by the argument for this, though.) Be warned: the x-height of Helvetica is so different from the x-height of Times that mixing the two in a single line looks strange. The packages for loading Times and Helvetica provide options for fixing this, though.
 \item
-  Futura is, in my opinion, a beautiful font that is very well-suited for presentations. Its thick letters make it robust against scaling, inversion, and low contrast. Unfortunately, while it is most likely installed on your system somewhere in some form, getting \TeX\ to work with it is a complicated process.
+  Futura is, in our opinion, a beautiful font that is very well-suited for presentations. Its thick letters make it robust against scaling, inversion, and low contrast. Unfortunately, while it is most likely installed on your system somewhere in some form, getting \TeX\ to work with it is a complicated process. However, it has been made a lot simpler with modern typesetting engines such as |luatex| and |xetex|.
 \item
   Times is a possible alternative to Computer Modern. Its main disadvantage is that it is a serif font, which requires a high-resolution projector. Naturally, it also used very often, so we all know it very well.
 \item

doc/beamerug-introduction.tex

 
 Joseph Wright: \emph{``Thanks to Till Tantau for the huge development effort in creating \beamer. Sincere thanks to Vedran Mileti\'c for taking the lead in continuing development.''}
 
-Vedran Mileti\'c: \emph{``First, I would like to thank Karl Berry and Sanda Buja\v ci\'c for encouragement, without which I wouldn't ever be anything but a \LaTeX\ user. I would also like to thank Ana Me\v strovi\'c, my colleague, who was excited by the prospect of using \beamer\ for preparing class material; Mladen Bo\v cev, Ivona Frankovi\'c, Marina Rajnovi\'c, Ivana \v Sari\'c, Danijela Suboti\'c, Emma Bla\v zevi\'c and Valter Pope\v ski\'c, my students at Department of Informatics, who were the first to hear about \LaTeX, \beamer\ and how it can help in preparing class material. I owe a lot to Till Tantau for developing \beamer\ in the first place and to Joseph Wright for developing \textsc{siunitx} and for helping me develop \beamer\ further.''}
+Vedran Mileti\'c: \emph{``First, I would like to thank Karl Berry and Sanda Buja\v ci\'c for encouragement, without which I wouldn't ever be anything but a \LaTeX\ user. I would also like to thank Ana Me\v strovi\'c, my colleague, who was excited by the prospect of using \beamer\ for preparing class material; Ivona Frankovi\'c and Marina Rajnovi\'c, my students at Department of Informatics, who were the first to hear about \LaTeX, \beamer\ and how it can help in preparing class material. I would like to thank Heiko Oberdiek (for \textsc{hyperref}), Johannes Braams (for \textsc{babel}) and Philipp Lehman (for \textsc{biblatex}). Above all, I owe a lot to Till Tantau for developing \beamer\ in the first place and to Joseph Wright for developing \textsc{siunitx} and for helping me develop \beamer\ further.''}
 
 
 \subsection{How to Read this User's Guide}

doc/beamerug-localstructure.tex

   The block name is typeset in bold.
 
   \lyxnote
-  The argument of the block must (currently) be given in \TeX-mode. More precisely, there must be an opening brace in \TeX-mode and a closing brace in \TeX-mode around it. The text in between can also be typeset using \LyX. I hope to get rid of this some day.
+  The argument of the block must (currently) be given in \TeX-mode. More precisely, there must be an opening brace in \TeX-mode and a closing brace in \TeX-mode around it. The text in between can also be typeset using \LyX. We hope to get rid of this some day.
 
   \begin{element}{block begin}\yes\no\no
     This template is inserted at the beginning of a block before the \meta{environment contents}. Inside this template, the block title can be accessed via the following insert:
 
   The theorem style (a concept from |amsthm|) used for this environment is |plain|. In this style, the body of a theorem should be typeset in italics. The head of the theorem should be typeset in a bold font, but this is usually overruled by the templates.
 
-  If the option |envcountsect| is given either as class option in one of the |presentation| modes or as an option to the package |beamerarticle| in |article| mode, then the numbering of the theorems is local to each section with the section number prefixing the theorem number; otherwise they are numbered consecutively throughout the presentation or article. I recommend using this option in |article| mode.
+  If the option |envcountsect| is given either as class option in one of the |presentation| modes or as an option to the package |beamerarticle| in |article| mode, then the numbering of the theorems is local to each section with the section number prefixing the theorem number; otherwise they are numbered consecutively throughout the presentation or article. We recommend using this option in |article| mode.
 
   By default, no theorem numbers are shown in the |presentation| modes.
 

doc/beamerug-nonpresentation.tex

   \item
     \declare{|notheorem|} will suppress the definition of standard environments like |theorem|, but |amsthm| is still loaded and the |\newtheorem| command still makes the defined environments overlay-specification-aware. Using this option allows you to define the standard environments in whatever way you like while retaining the power of the extensions to |amsthm|.
   \item
-    \declare{|envcountsect|} causes theorem, definitions and the like to be numbered with each section. Thus instead of Theorem~1 you get Theorem~1.1. I recommend using this option.
+    \declare{|envcountsect|} causes theorem, definitions and the like to be numbered with each section. Thus instead of Theorem~1 you get Theorem~1.1. We recommend using this option.
   \item
     \declare{|noxcolor|} will suppress the loading of the |xcolor| package. No colors will be defined.
   \end{itemize}

doc/beamerug-solutions.tex

 
 In the subdirectories of the directory |beamer/solutions| you will find \emph{solution templates} in different languages. A solution template is a \TeX-text that ``solves'' a specific problem. Such a problem might be ``I need to create a 20 minute talk for a conference'' or ``I want to create a slide that introduces the next speaker'' or ``I want to create a table that is uncovered piecewise.'' For such a problem, a solution template consists of a mixture of a template and an example that can be used to solve this particular problem. Just copy the solution template file (or parts of it) and freely adjust them to your needs.
 
-The collecting of \beamer\ solution templates has only begun and currently there are only very few of them. I hope that in the future more solutions will become available and I would like to encourage users of the \beamer\ class to send me solutions they develop. I would also like to encourage users to help in translating solutions to languages other than English and German. If you have written a solution or a translation, please feel free to send it to me (make sure however, that it contains about the same amount of explanations and justifications as do the existing solutions).
+The collecting of \beamer\ solution templates has only begun and currently there are only very few of them. We hope that in the future more solutions will become available and we would like to encourage users of the \beamer\ class to send us solutions they develop. We would also like to encourage users to help in translating solutions to languages other than English and German. If you have written a solution or a translation, please feel free to send it to us (make sure however, that it contains about the same amount of explanations and justifications as do the existing solutions).
 
 The following list of solution templates is sorted by the length of the talks for which they provide a template. As always, the solutions can be found in the directory |beamer/solutions|.
 

doc/beamerug-themes.tex

 
 A presentation theme dictates for every single detail of a presentation what it looks like. Normally, having chosen a particular presentation theme, you do not need to specify anything else having to do with the appearance of your presentation---the creator of the theme should have taken care of that for you. However, you still \emph{can} change things afterward either by using a different color, font, element, or even layout theme; or by changing specific colors, fonts, or templates directly.
 
-When I started naming the presentation themes, I soon ran out of ideas on how to call them. Instead of giving them more and more cumbersome names, I decided to switch to a different naming convention: Except for two special cases, all presentation themes are named after cities. These cities happen to be cities in which or near which there was a conference or workshop that I attended or that a co-author of mine attended.
+When Till started naming the presentation themes, he soon ran out of ideas on how to call them. Instead of giving them more and more cumbersome names, he decided to switch to a different naming convention: Except for two special cases, all presentation themes are named after cities. These cities happen to be cities in which or near which there was a conference or workshop that he attended or that a co-author of his attended.
 
-If a theme has not been developped by me (that is, if someone else is to blame), this is indicated with the theme. I have sometimes slightly changed or ``corrected'' submitted themes, but I still list the original authors.
+All themes listed without author mentioned were developed by Till. If a theme has not been developped by us (that is, if someone else is to blame), this is indicated with the theme. We have sometimes slightly changed or ``corrected'' submitted themes, but we still list the original authors.
 
 \begin{themeexample}{default}
   As the name suggests, this theme is installed by default. It is a sober no-nonsense theme that makes minimal use of color or font variations. This theme is useful for all kinds of talks, except for very long talks.
   \item \declare{|height=|\meta{dimension}} sets the height of the frame title bar.
   \end{itemize}
 
-  Rochester is a town in upstate New York, USA. I visited Rochester in 2001.
+  Rochester is a town in upstate New York, USA. Till visited Rochester in 2001.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 
   \item \declare{|width=|\meta{dimension}} sets the width of the sidebar. If set to zero, no sidebar is created.
   \end{itemize}
 
-  Berkeley is on the western coast of the USA, near San Francisco. I visited Berkeley for a year in 2004.
+  Berkeley is on the western coast of the USA, near San Francisco. Till visited Berkeley for a year in 2004.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{PaloAlto}

doc/beamerug-twoscreens.tex

 \section{Taking Advantage of Multiple Screens}
 \label{section-twoscreens}
 
-This section describes options provided by \beamer\ for taking advantage of computers that have more than one video output and can display different outputs on them. For such systems, one video output can be attached to a projector and the main presentation is shown there. The second video output is attached to a small extra monitor (or is just shown on the display of the computer) and shows, for example, special notes for you. Alternatively, the two outputs might be attached to two different projectors. One can then show the main presentation on the first projection and, say, the table of contents on the second. Or the second projection might show a version translated into a different language. Or the seoncd projection might alwyas show the ``previous'' slide. Or \ldots---I am sure you can think of further useful things.
+This section describes options provided by \beamer\ for taking advantage of computers that have more than one video output and can display different outputs on them. For such systems, one video output can be attached to a projector and the main presentation is shown there. The second video output is attached to a small extra monitor (or is just shown on the display of the computer) and shows, for example, special notes for you. Alternatively, the two outputs might be attached to two different projectors. One can then show the main presentation on the first projection and, say, the table of contents on the second. Or the second projection might show a version translated into a different language. Or the seoncd projection might alwyas show the ``previous'' slide. Or \ldots---we are sure you can think of further useful things.
 
 The basic idea behind \beamer's support of two video outputs is the following: Using special options you can ask \beamer\ to create a \pdf-file in which the ``pages'' are unusually wide or high. By default, their height will still be 128mm, but their width will be 192mm (twice the usual default 96mm). These ``superwide'' pages will show the slides of the main presentation on the left and auxilliary material on the right (this can be switched using appropriate options, though hyperlinks will only work if the presentation is on the left and the second screen on the right).
 

doc/beamerug-workflow.tex

 You may also wish to create an article version of your talk. An ``article version'' of your presentation is a normal \TeX\ text typeset using, for example, the document class |article| or perhaps |llncs| or a similar document class. The \beamer\ class offers facilities to have this version coexist with your presentation version in one file and to share code. Also, you can include slides of your presentation as figures in your article version. Details on how to setup the article version can be found in Section~\ref{section-article}.
 
 \lyxnote
-Creating an article version is not really possible in \LyX. You can \emph{try}, but I would not advise it.
+Creating an article version is not really possible in \LyX. You can \emph{try}, but we would not advise it.
 
 \subsubsection{Printing the Handout}
 \label{section-printing-version}