Commits

Vedran Miletić committed 161eaf4

Updating documentation for version 3.08, part 1 (more to follow). Short changelog:
-- remove linebreaks in paragraphs (they are very inconsisent anyway)
-- mention Debian and Ubuntu in "installation" instead of just Debian, mention versions
-- mention Fedora
-- put TeX Live and MacTeX vs. MikTeX and proTeXt
-- replace "my" with "our" and "I" with "we"
-- put Till's thanks into quotation, add mine, and put placeholder for Joseph's
-- convert all documents to plain ASCII, and put utf8 inputenc instead of latin1 (just in case)
-- use lmodern and T1 fontenc
-- mention utf8 vs utf8x in presentation and article mode and hyperref in article mode

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Files changed (14)

 Main development:
 
-Till Tantau <tantau@tcs.uni-luebeck.de>
+Till Tantau <tantau@users.sourceforge.net>
 Vedran Mileti\'c <vmiletic@inf.uniri.hr>
 
 

doc/beamercolorthemeexample.tex

 \fi
 
 
-
-
 \input{beamerthemeexamplebase}
-
-

doc/beamerfontthemeexample.tex

 
 \usefonttheme{\themename}
 
+
 \input{beamerthemeexamplebase}

doc/beamerouterthemeexample.tex

 \useoutertheme{\themename}
 \usecolortheme{seahorse}
 
+
 \input{beamerthemeexamplebase}

doc/beamerthemeexample.tex

 
 \usetheme{\themename}
 
+
 \input{beamerthemeexamplebase}

doc/beamerthemeexamplebase.tex

 \end{frame}
 
 \end{document}
-
-

doc/beamerug-animations.tex

 
 \label{section-multimedia}
 
-If you have created an animation using some external
-program (like a renderer), you can use the capabilities of the
-presentation program (like the Acrobat Reader) to show the
-animation. Unfortunately, currently there is no portable way of doing
-this and even the Acrobat Reader does not support this feature on all
-platforms.
+If you have created an animation using some external program (like a renderer), you can use the capabilities of the presentation program (like the Acrobat Reader) to show the animation. Unfortunately, currently there is no portable way of doing this and even the Acrobat Reader does not support this feature on all platforms.
 
-To include an animation in a presentation, you can use, for example,
-the package |multimedia.sty| which is part of the \beamer\
-package. You have to include this package explicitly. Despite being
-distributed as part of the \beamer\ distribution, this package is
-perfectly self-sufficient and can be used independently of \beamer.
+To include an animation in a presentation, you can use, for example, the package |multimedia.sty| which is part of the \beamer\ package. You have to include this package explicitly. Despite being distributed as part of the \beamer\ distribution, this package is perfectly self-sufficient and can be used independently of \beamer.
 
 \begin{package}{{multimedia}}
-  A stand-alone package that implements several commands for including
-  external animation and sound files in a \pdf\ document. The package
-  can be used together with both |dvips| plus |ps2pdf| and |pdflatex|,
-  though the special sound support is available only in |pdflatex|.
+  A stand-alone package that implements several commands for including external animation and sound files in a \pdf\ document. The package can be used together with both |dvips| plus |ps2pdf| and |pdflatex|, though the special sound support is available only in |pdflatex|.
 
-  When including this package, you must also include the |hyperref|
-  package. Since you will typically want to include |hyperref| only at
-  the very end of the preamble, |multimedia| will not include
-  |hyperref| itself. However, |multimedia| can be included both before
-  and after |hyperref|. Since \beamer\ includes |hyperref|
-  automatically, you need not worry about this when creating a
-  presentation using \beamer.
+  When including this package, you must also include the |hyperref| package. Since you will typically want to include |hyperref| only at the very end of the preamble, |multimedia| will not include |hyperref| itself. However, |multimedia| can be included both before and after |hyperref|. Since \beamer\ includes |hyperref| automatically, you need not worry about this when creating a presentation using \beamer.
 \end{package}
 
-For including an animation in a \pdf\ file, you can use the command
-|\movie|, which is explained below. Depending on the used options,
-this command will either setup the \pdf\ file such that the viewer
-application (like the Acrobat Reader) itself will try to play the
-movie or that an external program will be called. The latter approach,
-though much less flexible, must be taken if the viewer application is
-unable to display the movie itself.
+For including an animation in a \pdf\ file, you can use the command |\movie|, which is explained below. Depending on the used options, this command will either setup the \pdf\ file such that the viewer application (like the Acrobat Reader) itself will try to play the movie or that an external program will be called. The latter approach, though much less flexible, must be taken if the viewer application is unable to display the movie itself.
 
 \begin{command}{\movie\oarg{options}\marg{poster text}\marg{movie
   filename}}

doc/beamerug-compatibility.tex

 
 \subsection{Compatibility with Other Packages and Classes}
 
-When using certain packages or classes together with the |beamer|
-class, extra options or precautions may be necessary.
+When using certain packages or classes together with the |beamer| class, extra options or precautions may be necessary.
 
 \begin{package}{{AlDraTex}}
-  Graphics created using AlDraTex must be treated like verbatim
-  text. The reason is that DraTex fiddles with catcodes and spaces
-  much like verbatim does. So, in order to insert a picture, either
-  add the |fragile| option to the frame or use the
-  |\defverbatim| command to create a box containing the picture.
+  Graphics created using AlDraTex must be treated like verbatim text. The reason is that DraTex fiddles with catcodes and spaces much like verbatim does. So, in order to insert a picture, either add the |fragile| option to the frame or use the |\defverbatim| command to create a box containing the picture.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{alltt}}
-  Text in an |alltt| environment must be treated like verbatim
-  text. So add the |fragile| option to frames containing this
-  environment or use |\defverbatim|.
+  Text in an |alltt| environment must be treated like verbatim text. So add the |fragile| option to frames containing this environment or use |\defverbatim|.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{amsthm}}
-  This package is automatically loaded since \beamer\ uses it for
-  typesetting theorems. If you do not wish it to be loaded, which can
-  be necessary especially in |article| mode if the package is
-  incompatible with the document class, you can use the class option
-  |noamsthm| to suppress its loading. See
-  Section~\ref{section-theorems} for more details.
+  This package is automatically loaded since \beamer\ uses it for typesetting theorems. If you do not wish it to be loaded, which can be necessary especially in |article| mode if the package is incompatible with the document class, you can use the class option |noamsthm| to suppress its loading. See Section~\ref{section-theorems} for more details.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{babel}|[|\declare{|french|}|]|}
-  When using the |french| style, certain features that clash with the
-  functionality of the \beamer\ class will be turned off. For example,
-  enumerations are still produced the way the theme dictates, not the
-  way the |french| style does.
+  When using the |french| style, certain features that clash with the functionality of the \beamer\ class will be turned off. For example, enumerations are still produced the way the theme dictates, not the way the |french| style does.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{babel}|[|\declare{|spanish|}|]|}
   \beamernote
-  When using the |spanish| style, certain features that clash with the
-  functionality of the \beamer\ class will be turned off. In particular,
-  the special behaviour of the pointed brackets |<| and |>| is
-  deactivated.
+  When using the |spanish| style, certain features that clash with the functionality of the \beamer\ class will be turned off. In particular, the special behaviour of the pointed brackets |<| and |>| is deactivated.
 
   \articlenote
-  To make the characters |<| and |>| active in |article| mode, pass
-  the option |activeospeccharacters| to the package
-  |beamerbasearticle|. This will lead to
-  problems with overlay specifications.
+  To make the characters |<| and |>| active in |article| mode, pass the option |activeospeccharacters| to the package |beamerbasearticle|. This will lead to problems with overlay specifications.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{color}}
   \beamernote
-  The |color| package is automatically loaded by |beamer.cls|. This
-  makes it impossible to pass options to |color| in the preamble of
-  your document in the normal manner. To pass a \meta{list of options}
-  to |color|, you can use the following class option:
+  The |color| package is automatically loaded by |beamer.cls|. This makes it impossible to pass options to |color| in the preamble of your document in the normal manner. To pass a \meta{list of options} to |color|, you can use the following class option:
 
   \begin{classoption}{color={\normalfont\meta{list of options}}}
-    Causes the \meta{list of options} to be passed on to the |color|
-    package. If the \meta{list of options} contains more than one
-    option you must enclose it in curly brackets.
+  Causes the \meta{list of options} to be passed on to the |color| package. If the \meta{list of options} contains more than one option you must enclose it in curly brackets.
   \end{classoption}
 
   \articlenote
-  The |color| package is not loaded automatically if
-  |beamerarticle| is loaded with the |noxcolor| option.
+  The |color| package is not loaded automatically if |beamerarticle| is loaded with the |noxcolor| option.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{colortbl}}
   \beamernote
-  With newer versions of |xcolor.sty|, you need to pass the option
-  |table| to |xcolor.sty| if you wish to use |colortbl|. See the notes
-  on |xcolor| below, on how to do this.
+  With newer versions of |xcolor.sty|, you need to pass the option |table| to |xcolor.sty| if you wish to use |colortbl|. See the notes on |xcolor| below, on how to do this.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{CJK}}
   \beamernote
-  When using the |CJK| package for using Asian fonts, you must use the
-  class option \declare{|CJK|}. See |beamerexample4.tex| for an
-  example.
+  When using the |CJK| package for using Asian fonts, you must use the class option \declare{|CJK|}. See |beamerexample4.tex| for an example.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{deluxetable}}
   \beamernote
-  The caption generation facilities of |deluxetable| are
-  deactivated. Instead, the caption template is used.
+  The caption generation facilities of |deluxetable| are deactivated. Instead, the caption template is used.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{DraTex}}
 
 \begin{package}{{enumerate}}
   \articlenote
-  This package is loaded automatically in the |presentation| modes, but not
-  in the |article| mode. If you use its features, you have to load the
-  package ``by hand'' in the |article| mode.
+  This package is loaded automatically in the |presentation| modes, but not in the |article| mode. If you use its features, you have to load the package ``by hand'' in the |article| mode.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{class}{{foils}}
-  If you wish to emulate the |foils| class using \beamer, please see
-  Section~\ref{section-foiltex}.
+  If you wish to emulate the |foils| class using \beamer, please see Section~\ref{section-foiltex}.
 \end{class}
 
 \begin{package}{{fontenc}|[|\declare{|T1|}|]|}
-  Use this option only with fonts that have outline fonts available in
-  the T1 encoding like Times or the |lmodern| fonts. In a standard
-  installation the standard Computer Modern fonts (the fonts Donald
-  Knuth originally designed and which are used by default) are
-  \emph{not} available in the T1 encoding. Using this  option with
-  them will result in very poor rendering of your presentation when
-  viewed with \pdf\ viewer applications like Acrobat or |xpdf|. To use
-  the Computer Modern fonts with the T1 encoding, use the package
-  |lmodern|.  See also Section~\ref{section-font-encoding}.
+  Use this option only with fonts that have outline fonts available in the T1 encoding like Times or the |lmodern| fonts. In a standard installation the standard Computer Modern fonts (the fonts Donald Knuth originally designed and which are used by default) are \emph{not} available in the T1 encoding. Using this option with them will result in very poor rendering of your presentation when viewed with \pdf\ viewer applications like Acrobat or |xpdf|. To use the Computer Modern fonts with the T1 encoding, use the package |lmodern|. See also Section~\ref{section-font-encoding}.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{fourier}}
-  The package switches to a T1~encoding, but it does not redefine all
-  fonts such that outline fonts (non-bitmapped fonts) are used by
-  default. For example, the sans-serif text and the typewriter text
-  are not replaced. To use outline fonts for these, write
-  |\usepackage{lmodern}| \emph{before} including the |fourier|
-  package.
+  The package switches to a T1~encoding, but it does not redefine all fonts such that outline fonts (non-bitmapped fonts) are used by default. For example, the sans-serif text and the typewriter text are not replaced. To use outline fonts for these, write |\usepackage{lmodern}| \emph{before} including the |fourier| package.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{HA-prosper}}
-  You cannot use this package with \beamer. However, you might try to
-  use the package |beamerprosper| instead, see
-  Section~\ref{section-prosper}.
+  You cannot use this package with \beamer. However, you might try to use the package |beamerprosper| instead, see Section~\ref{section-prosper}.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{hyperref}}
   \beamernote
-  The |hyperref| package is automatically loaded by |beamer.cls| and
-  certain options are set up. In order to pass additional options to
-  |hyperref| or to override options, you can use the following class
-  option:
+  The |hyperref| package is automatically loaded by |beamer.cls| and certain options are set up. In order to pass additional options to |hyperref| or to override options, you can use the following class option:
 
   \begin{classoption}{hyperref={\normalfont\meta{list of options}}}
-    Causes the \meta{list of options} to be passed on to the |hyperref|
-    package.
+    Causes the \meta{list of options} to be passed on to the |hyperref| package.
 
     \example |\documentclass[hyperref={bookmarks=false}]{beamer}|
   \end{classoption}
   Alternatively, you can also use the |\hypersetup| command.
 
   \articlenote
-  In the |article| version, you must include |hyperref| manually if
-  you want to use it. It is not included automatically.
+  In the |article| version, you must include |hyperref| manually if you want to use it. You can do so by passing option |hyperref| to |beamerarticle|. It is not included automatically.
 \end{package}
 
-\begin{package}{{inputenc}|[|\declare{|utf8|}|]|}
+\begin{package}{{inputenc}|[|\declare{|utf8,utf8x|}|]|}
   \beamernote
-  When using Unicode, you may wish to use one of the following class
-  options:
+  When using Unicode, you may wish to use one of the following class options:
   \begin{classoption}{ucs}
-    Loads the package |ucs| and passes the correct Unicode options to
-    |hyperref|. Also, it preloads the Unicode code pages zero and
-    one.
+    Loads the package |ucs| and passes the correct Unicode options to |hyperref|. Also, it preloads the Unicode code pages zero and one.
   \end{classoption}
 
-  \begin{classoption}{utf8}
-    Same as the option |ucs|, but also sets the input encoding to
-    |utf8|. You could also use the option |ucs| and say
-    |\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}| in the preamble.
+  \begin{classoption}{utf8x}
+    Same as the option |ucs|, but also sets the input encoding to |utf8x|. You could also use the option |ucs| and say |\usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc}| in the preamble. This also automatically loads |ucs| package in most \TeX\ systems.
   \end{classoption}
 
-  If you use a Unicode character outside the first two code pages
-  (which includes the Latin alphabet and the extended Latin alphabet)
-  in a section or subsection heading, you have to use the command
-  |\PreloadUnicodePage{|\meta{code  page}|}| to give |ucs| a chance to
-  preload these code pages. You will know that a character has not
-  been preloaded, if you get a message like ``Please insert into
-  preamble.'' The code page of a character is given by the unicode
-  number of the character divided by 256.
+  If you use a Unicode character outside the first two code pages (which includes the Latin alphabet and the extended Latin alphabet) in a section or subsection heading, you have to use the command |\PreloadUnicodePage{|\meta{code  page}|}| to give |ucs| a chance to preload these code pages. You will know that a character has not been preloaded, if you get a message like ``Please insert into preamble.'' The code page of a character is given by the unicode number of the character divided by 256.
+
+  \begin{classoption}{utf8}
+    This option sets the input encoding to |utf8|. It's designed to be used \emph{without} |ucs|. It's the same as saying |\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}| in the preamble.
+  \end{classoption}
+
+  \articlenote
+  Passing option |utf8| to |beamerarticle| has the same effect as saying |\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}| in the preamble.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{listings}}
   \beamernote
-  Note that you must treat |lstlisting| environments exactly the same
-  way as you would treat |verbatim| environments. When using
-  |\defverbatim| that contains a colored |lstlisting|, use the
-  |colored| option of |\defverbatim|.
+  Note that you must treat |lstlisting| environments exactly the same way as you would treat |verbatim| environments. When using |\defverbatim| that contains a colored |lstlisting|, use the |colored| option of |\defverbatim|.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{msc}}
   \beamernote
-  Since this packages uses |pstricks| internally, everything that
-  applies to pstricks also applies to |msc|.
+  Since this packages uses |pstricks| internally, everything that applies to pstricks also applies to |msc|.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{musixtex}}
-  When using  MusiX\TeX\ to typeset musical scores, your document must
-  be compiled with |pdfelatex| or |elatex| instead of |pdflatex| or
-  |latex|.
+  When using  MusiX\TeX\ to typeset musical scores, your document must be compiled with |pdfelatex| or |elatex| instead of |pdflatex| or |latex|.
 
-  Inside  a |music| environment, the |\pause| is redefined to match
-  MusiX\TeX's definition (a rest during one quarter of a whole). You can
-  use the |\beamerpause| command  to create overlays in this
-  environment.
+  Inside a |music| environment, the |\pause| is redefined to match MusiX\TeX's definition (a rest during one quarter of a whole). You can use the |\beamerpause| command  to create overlays in this environment.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{pdfpages}}
-  Commands like |\includepdf| only work \emph{outside} frames as they
-  produce pages ``by themselves.'' You may also wish to say
+  Commands like |\includepdf| only work \emph{outside} frames as they produce pages ``by themselves.'' You may also wish to say
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamercolor{background canvas}{bg=}
 \end{verbatim}
-  when you use such a command since the background (even a white
-  background) will otherwise be printed over the image you try to include.
+  when you use such a command since the background (even a white background) will otherwise be printed over the image you try to include.
 
   \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 
 \begin{package}{{\normalfont\meta{professional font package}}}
   \beamernote
-  If you use a professional font package, \beamer's internal
-  redefinition of how variables are typeset may interfere with the
-  font package's superior way of typesetting them. In this case, you
-  should use the class option |professionalfont| to suppress any font
-  substitution. See Section~\ref{section-substition} for details.
+  If you use a professional font package, \beamer's internal redefinition of how variables are typeset may interfere with the font package's superior way of typesetting them. In this case, you should use the class option |professionalfont| to suppress any font substitution. See Section~\ref{section-substition} for details.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{class}{{prosper}}
-  If you wish to (partly) emulate the |prosper| class using \beamer,
-  please see Section~\ref{section-prosper}.
+  If you wish to (partly) emulate the |prosper| class using \beamer, please see Section~\ref{section-prosper}.
 \end{class}
 
 \begin{package}{{pstricks}}
-  You should add the option |xcolor=pst| to make |xcolor| aware of the
-  fact that you are using |pstricks|.
+  You should add the option |xcolor=pst| to make |xcolor| aware of the fact that you are using |pstricks|.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{class}{{seminar}}
-  If you wish to emulate the |seminar| class using \beamer, please see
-  Section~\ref{section-seminar}.
+  If you wish to emulate the |seminar| class using \beamer, please see Section~\ref{section-seminar}.
 \end{class}
 
 \begin{package}{{texpower}}
-  You cannot use this package with \beamer. However, you might try to
-  use the package |beamertexpower| instead, see
-  Section~\ref{section-texpower}.
+  You cannot use this package with \beamer. However, you might try to use the package |beamertexpower| instead, see Section~\ref{section-texpower}.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{textpos}}
   \beamernote
-  \beamer\ automatically installs a white background behind
-  everything, unless you install a different background
-  template. Because of this, you must use the |overlay| option when
-  using |textpos|, so that it will place boxes \emph{in front of}
-  everything. Alternatively, you can install an empty background
-  template, but this may result in an incorrect display in certain
-  situtations with older versions of the Acrobat Reader.
+  \beamer\ automatically installs a white background behind everything, unless you install a different background template. Because of this, you must use the |overlay| option when using |textpos|, so that it will place boxes \emph{in front of} everything. Alternatively, you can install an empty background template, but this may result in an incorrect display in certain situtations with older versions of the Acrobat Reader.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{ucs}}
-  See |\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}|.
+  See |\usepackage[utf8,utf8x]{inputenc}|.
 \end{package}
 
 
 \begin{package}{{xcolor}}
   \beamernote
-  The |xcolor| package is automatically loaded by |beamer.cls|. The
-  same applies as to |color|.
+  The |xcolor| package is automatically loaded by |beamer.cls|. The same applies as to |color|.
 
   \begin{classoption}{xcolor={\normalfont\meta{list of options}}}
-    Causes the \meta{list of options} to be passed on to the |xcolor|
-    package.
+    Causes the \meta{list of options} to be passed on to the |xcolor| package.
   \end{classoption}
 
-  When using \beamer\ together with the |pstricks| package, be sure to
-  pass the |xcolor=pst| option to \beamer\ (and hence to |xcolor|).
+  When using \beamer\ together with the |pstricks| package, be sure to pass the |xcolor=pst| option to \beamer\ (and hence to |xcolor|).
 
   \articlenote
-  The |color| package is not loaded automatically if
-  |beamerarticle| is loaded with the |noxcolor| option.
+  The |color| package is not loaded automatically if |beamerarticle| is loaded with the |noxcolor| option.
 \end{package}
-
-
-
-

doc/beamerug-fonts.tex

 
 \label{section-fonts}
 
-The first subsection introduces the predefined font
-themes that come with \beamer\ and which make it easy to change the
-fonts used in a presentation. The next subsection describes further
-special commands for changing some basic attributes of the fonts used in a
-presentation. The last subsection explains how you can get a much more
-fine-grained control over the fonts used for every individual element
-of a presentation.
-
-
-
+The first subsection introduces the predefined font themes that come with \beamer\ and which make it easy to change the fonts used in a presentation. The next subsection describes further special commands for changing some basic attributes of the fonts used in a presentation. The last subsection explains how you can get a much more fine-grained control over the fonts used for every individual element of a presentation.
 
 
 \subsection{Font Themes}
 
-\beamer\ comes with a set of font themes. When you use such a theme,
-certain fonts are changed as described below. You can use several font
-themes in concert. For historical reasons, you cannot change all
-aspects of the fonts used using font themes---in some cases special
-commands and options are needed, which are described in the next
-subsection.
+\beamer\ comes with a set of font themes. When you use such a theme, certain fonts are changed as described below. You can use several font themes in concert. For historical reasons, you cannot change all aspects of the fonts used using font themes---in some cases special commands and options are needed, which are described in the next subsection.
 
-The following font themes only change certain font attributes, they do
-not choose special font families (although that would also be possible
-and themes doing just that might be added in the future). Currently,
-to change the font family, you need to load special packages as
-explained in the next subsection.
+The following font themes only change certain font attributes, they do not choose special font families (although that would also be possible and themes doing just that might be added in the future). Currently, to change the font family, you need to load special packages as explained in the next subsection.
 
 
 \begin{fontthemeexample}{default}
-  The default font theme installs a sans serif font for all text of
-  the presentation. The default theme installs different font sizes
-  for things like titles or head- and footlines, but does not use
-  boldface or italics for ``highlighting.'' To change some or all text
-  to a serif font, use the |serif| theme.
+  The default font theme installs a sans serif font for all text of the presentation. The default theme installs different font sizes for things like titles or head- and footlines, but does not use boldface or italics for ``highlighting.'' To change some or all text to a serif font, use the |serif| theme.
 
-  Note: The command |\mathrm| will always produce upright (not
-  slanted), serif text and the command |\mathsf| will always produce
-  upright, sans-serif text. The command |\mathbf| will produce
-  upright, bold-face, sans-serif or serif text, depending on whether
-  |mathsans| or |mathserif| is used.
+  Note: The command |\mathrm| will always produce upright (not slanted), serif text and the command |\mathsf| will always produce upright, sans-serif text. The command |\mathbf| will produce upright, bold-face, sans-serif or serif text, depending on whether |mathsans| or |mathserif| is used.
 
-  To produce an upright, sans-serif or serif text, depending on
-  whether |mathsans| or |mathserif| is used, you can use for instance
-  the command |\operatorname| from the |amsmath| package. Using this
-  command instead of |\mathrm| or |\mathsf| directly will
-  automatically adjust  upright mathematical text if you switch from
-  sans-serif to serif or back.
+  To produce an upright, sans-serif or serif text, depending on whether |mathsans| or |mathserif| is used, you can use for instance the command |\operatorname| from the |amsmath| package. Using this command instead of |\mathrm| or |\mathsf| directly will automatically adjust upright mathematical text if you switch from sans-serif to serif or back.
 \end{fontthemeexample}
 
 \begin{fontthemeexample*}{professionalfonts}
-  This font theme does not really change any fonts. Rather, it
-  \emph{suppresses} certain internal replacements performed by
-  \beamer. If you use ``professional fonts'' (fonts that you buy and
-  that come with a complete set of every symbol in all modes), you do
-  not want \beamer\ to meddle with the fonts you use.  \beamer\
-  normally replaces certain character glyphs in mathematical text by
-  more appropriate versions. For example, \beamer\ will normally
-  replace glyphs such that the italic characters from the main font
-  are used for variables in mathematical text. If your professional
-  font package takes care of this already, \beamer's meddling should
-  be switched off. Note that \beamer's substitution is automatically
-  turned off if one of the following packages is loaded: |mathtime|,
-  |mathpmnt|, |lucidabr|, |mtpro|, and |hvmath|. If your favorite
-  professional font package is not among these, use the
-  |professionalfont| option (and write me an email, so that the
-  package can be added).
+  This font theme does not really change any fonts. Rather, it \emph{suppresses} certain internal replacements performed by \beamer. If you use ``professional fonts'' (fonts that you buy and that come with a complete set of every symbol in all modes), you do not want \beamer\ to meddle with the fonts you use. \beamer\ normally replaces certain character glyphs in mathematical text by more appropriate versions. For example, \beamer\ will normally replace glyphs such that the italic characters from the main font are used for variables in mathematical text. If your professional font package takes care of this already, \beamer's meddling should be switched off. Note that \beamer's substitution is automatically turned off if one of the following packages is loaded: |mathtime|, |mathpmnt|, |lucidabr|, |mtpro|, and |hvmath|. If your favorite professional font package is not among these, use the |professionalfont| option (and write me an email, so that the package can be added).
 \end{fontthemeexample*}
 
 
 
 \begin{fontthemeexample}[\oarg{options}]{serif}
-  This theme causes all text to be typeset using the default serif font
-  (except if you specify certain \meta{options}). You might wish to
-  consult Section~\ref{section-guidelines-serif} on whether you should
-  use serif fonts.
+  This theme causes all text to be typeset using the default serif font (except if you specify certain \meta{options}). You might wish to consult Section~\ref{section-guidelines-serif} on whether you should use serif fonts.
 
   The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
   \item
     \declare{|stillsansserifmath|}
-    causes mathematical text still to be typeset using sans
-    serif. This option only makes sense if you also use the
-    |stillsansseriftext| option since sans serif math inside serif
-    text looks silly.
+    causes mathematical text still to be typeset using sans serif. This option only makes sense if you also use the |stillsansseriftext| option since sans serif math inside serif text looks silly.
   \item
     \declare{|stillsansserifsmall|}
-    will cause ``small'' text to be still typeset using sans
-    serif. This refers to the text in the headline, footline, and
-    sidebars.  Using this options is often advisable since small text
-    is often easier to read in sans serif.
+    will cause ``small'' text to be still typeset using sans serif. This refers to the text in the headline, footline, and sidebars.  Using this options is often advisable since small text is often easier to read in sans serif.
   \item
     \declare{|stillsansseriflarge|}
-    will cause ``large'' text like the presentation title or the frame
-    title to be still typeset using sans serif. Sans serif titles with
-    serif text are a popular combination in typography.
+    will cause ``large'' text like the presentation title or the frame title to be still typeset using sans serif. Sans serif titles with serif text are a popular combination in typography.
   \item
     \declare{|stillsansseriftext|}
-    will cause normal text (none of the above three) to be still
-    typeset using sans serif. If you use this option, you should most
-    likely also use the first two. However, by not using
-    |stillsansseriflarge|, you get a serif (possibly italic) title
-    over a sans serif text. This can be an interesting visual
-    effect. Naturally, ``interesting typographic effect'' can mean
-    ``terrible typographic effect'' if you choose the wrong fonts
-    combinations or sizes. You'll need some typographic experience to
-    judge this correctly. If in doubt, try asking someone who should
-    know.
+    will cause normal text (none of the above three) to be still typeset using sans serif. If you use this option, you should most likely also use the first two. However, by not using |stillsansseriflarge|, you get a serif (possibly italic) title over a sans serif text. This can be an interesting visual effect. Naturally, ``interesting typographic effect'' can mean ``terrible typographic effect'' if you choose the wrong fonts combinations or sizes. You'll need some typographic experience to judge this correctly. If in doubt, try asking someone who should know.
   \item
     \declare{|onlymath|}
-    is a short-cut for selecting all of the above options except for
-    the first. Thus, using this option causes only mathematical text
-    to by typeset using a serif font. Recall that, by default,
-    mathematical formulas are also typeset using sans-serif
-    letters. In most cases, this is visually the most pleasing and
-    easily readable way of typesetting mathematical formulas if the
-    surrounding text is typeset using sans serif. However,
-    in mathematical texts the font used to render, say, a variable is
-    sometimes used to differentiate between different meanings of this
-    variable. In such case, it may be necessary to typeset
-    mathematical text using serif letters. Also, if you have a lot of
-    mathematical text, the audience may be quicker to ``parse'' it if
-    it is typeset the way people usually read mathematical text: in a
-    serif font.
+    is a short-cut for selecting all of the above options except for the first. Thus, using this option causes only mathematical text to by typeset using a serif font. Recall that, by default, mathematical formulas are also typeset using sans-serif letters. In most cases, this is visually the most pleasing and easily readable way of typesetting mathematical formulas if the surrounding text is typeset using sans serif. However, in mathematical texts the font used to render, say, a variable is sometimes used to differentiate between different meanings of this variable. In such case, it may be necessary to typeset mathematical text using serif letters. Also, if you have a lot of mathematical text, the audience may be quicker to ``parse'' it if it is typeset the way people usually read mathematical text: in a serif font.
   \end{itemize}
 \end{fontthemeexample}
 
-
-
 \begin{fontthemeexample}[\oarg{options}]{structurebold}
-  This font theme will cause titles and text in the headlines,
-  footlines, and sidebars to be typeset in a bold font.
+  This font theme will cause titles and text in the headlines, footlines, and sidebars to be typeset in a bold font.
 
   The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
   \item
     \declare{|onlysmall|}
-    will cause only ``small'' text to be typeset in bold. More
-    precisely, only the text in the headline, footline, and sidebars
-    is changed to be typeset in bold. Large titles are not affected.
+    will cause only ``small'' text to be typeset in bold. More precisely, only the text in the headline, footline, and sidebars is changed to be typeset in bold. Large titles are not affected.
   \item
     \declare{|onlylarge|}
-    will cause only ``large'' text to be typeset in bold. These are
-    the main title, frame titles, and section entries in the table of
-    contents.
+    will cause only ``large'' text to be typeset in bold. These are the main title, frame titles, and section entries in the table of contents.
   \end{itemize}
 
-  As pointed out in Section~\ref{section-sizes}, you should use this
-  theme (possibly with the |onlysmall| option) if your font is not
-  scaled down properly or for light-on-dark text.
+  As pointed out in Section~\ref{section-sizes}, you should use this theme (possibly with the |onlysmall| option) if your font is not scaled down properly or for light-on-dark text.
 
-  The normal themes do not install this theme by default, while the
-  old compatibility themes do. Since you can reload the theme once it
-  has been loaded, you cannot use this theme with the old
-  compatibility themes to set also titles to a bold font.
+  The normal themes do not install this theme by default, while the old compatibility themes do. Since you can reload the theme once it has been loaded, you cannot use this theme with the old compatibility themes to set also titles to a bold font.
 \end{fontthemeexample}
 
 \begin{fontthemeexample}[\oarg{options}]{structureitalicserif}
-  This theme is similarly as the |structurebold| font theme, but where
-  |structurebold| makes text bold, this theme typesets it in italics and
-  in the standard serif font. The same \meta{options} as for the
-  |structurebold| theme are supported. See
-  Section~\ref{section-italics} for the pros and cons
-  of using italics.
+  This theme is similarly as the |structurebold| font theme, but where |structurebold| makes text bold, this theme typesets it in italics and in the standard serif font. The same \meta{options} as for the |structurebold| theme are supported. See Section~\ref{section-italics} for the pros and cons of using italics.
 \end{fontthemeexample}
 
 \begin{fontthemeexample}[\oarg{options}]{structuresmallcapsserif}
-  Again, this theme does exactly the same as the |structurebold| font theme,
-  only this time text is set using small caps and a serif
-    font. The same \meta{options} as for the |structurebold| theme are
-  supported. See Section~\ref{section-smallcaps} for the pros and cons
-  of using small caps.
+  Again, this theme does exactly the same as the |structurebold| font theme, only this time text is set using small caps and a serif font. The same \meta{options} as for the |structurebold| theme are supported. See Section~\ref{section-smallcaps} for the pros and cons of using small caps.
 \end{fontthemeexample}
 
 
-
-
-
-
 \subsection{Font Changes Made Without Using Font Themes}
 
-While most font decisions can be made using font themes, for
-historical reasons some changes can only be made using class
-options or by loading special packages. These options are explained in
-the following. Possibly, these options will be replaced by themes in
-the future.
-
+While most font decisions can be made using font themes, for historical reasons some changes can only be made using class options or by loading special packages. These options are explained in the following. Possibly, these options will be replaced by themes in the future.
 
 \subsubsection{Choosing a Font Size for Normal Text}
 
-As pointed out in Section~\ref{section-sizes}, measuring the default
-font size in points is not really a good idea for
-presentations. Nevertheless, \beamer\ does just that, setting the
-default font size to 11pt as usual. This may seem ridiculously small, but
-the actual size of each frame is just 128mm by 96mm and the viewer
-application enlarges the font. By specifying a default font size
-smaller than 11pt you can put more onto each slide, by specifying a
-larger font size you can fit on less.
+As pointed out in Section~\ref{section-sizes}, measuring the default font size in points is not really a good idea for presentations. Nevertheless, \beamer\ does just that, setting the default font size to 11pt as usual. This may seem ridiculously small, but the actual size of each frame is just 128mm by 96mm and the viewer application enlarges the font. By specifying a default font size smaller than 11pt you can put more onto each slide, by specifying a larger font size you can fit on less.
 
 To specify the font size, you can use the following class options:
 
 \begin{classoption}{8pt}
-  This is way too small. Requires that the package |extsize|
-  is installed.
+  This is way too small. Requires that the package |extsize| is installed.
 \end{classoption}
 
 \begin{classoption}{9pt}
-  This is also too small. Requires that the package |extsize|
-  is installed.
+  This is also too small. Requires that the package |extsize| is installed.
 \end{classoption}
 
 \begin{classoption}{10pt}
-  If you really need to fit more onto each frame, use this
-  option. Works without |extsize|.
+  If you really need to fit more onto each frame, use this option. Works without |extsize|.
 \end{classoption}
 
 \begin{classoption}{smaller}
-  Same as the |10pt| option.
-\end{classoption}
+  Same as the |10pt| option. \end{classoption}
 
 \begin{classoption}{11pt}
   The default font size. You need not specify this option.
 \end{classoption}
 
 \begin{classoption}{12pt}
-  Makes all fonts a little bigger, which makes the text more
-  readable. The downside is that less fits onto each frame.
+  Makes all fonts a little bigger, which makes the text more readable. The downside is that less fits onto each frame.
 \end{classoption}
 
 \begin{classoption}{bigger}
 \end{classoption}
 
 \begin{classoption}{17pt}
-  This is about the default size of PowerPoint. Requires |extsize| to
-  be installed.
+  This is about the default size of PowerPoint and OpenOffice.org Impress. Requires |extsize| to be installed.
 \end{classoption}
 
 \begin{classoption}{20pt}
   This is really huge. Requires |extsize| to be installed.
 \end{classoption}
 
-
-
 \subsubsection{Choosing a Font Family}
 
 \label{section-substition}
 
-By default, \beamer\ uses the Computer Modern fonts. To change this,
-you can use one of the prepared packages of \LaTeX's font
-mechanism. For example, to change to Times/Helvetica, simply add
+By default, \beamer\ uses the Computer Modern fonts. To change this, you can use one of the prepared packages of \LaTeX's font mechanism. For example, to change to Times/Helvetica, simply add
 \begin{verbatim}
 \usepackage{mathptmx}
 \usepackage{helvet}
 \end{verbatim}
-in your preamble. Note that if you do not use the |serif| font theme,
-Helvetica (not Times) will be selected as the text font.
+in your preamble. Note that if you do not use the |serif| font theme, Helvetica (not Times) will be selected as the text font.
 
-There may be many other fonts available on your
-installation. Typically, at least some of the following packages
-should be available: |avant|, |bookman|, |chancery|, |charter|,
-|euler|, |helvet|, |mathtime|, |mathptm|, |mathptmx|, |newcent|,
-|palatino|, |pifont|, |utopia|.
-
+There may be many other fonts available on your installation. Typically, at least some of the following packages should be available: |avant|, |bookman|, |chancery|, |charter|, |euler|, |helvet|, |lmodern|, |mathtime|, |mathptm|, |mathptmx|, |newcent|, |palatino|, |pifont|, |utopia|.
 
 \subsubsection{Choosing a Font Encodings}
 \label{section-font-encoding}
 
-The same font can come in different encodings, which are (very roughly
-spoken) the ways the characters of a text are mapped to glyphs (the
-actual shape of a particular character in a particular font at a
-particular size). In \TeX\ two encodings are often used with Latin
-characters: the T1~encoding and the OT1~encoding (old T1~encoding).
+The same font can come in different encodings, which are (very roughly spoken) the ways the characters of a text are mapped to glyphs (the actual shape of a particular character in a particular font at a particular size). In \TeX\ two encodings are often used with Latin characters: the T1~encoding and the OT1~encoding (old T1~encoding).
 
-Conceptually, the newer T1~encoding is preferable over the old
-OT1~encoding. For example, hyphenation of words containing umlauts
-(like the famous German word Fr\"aulein) will work only if you use the
-T1~encoding. Unfortunately, the EC fonts, that is, the T1-encoded
-Computer Modern fonts, are distributed on small installations just as
-MetaFont sources and only have bitmap renditions of each glyph. For
-this reason, using the T1-encoded EC fonts on such small installations
-will produce \pdf\ files that render poorly.
+Conceptually, the newer T1~encoding is preferable over the old OT1~encoding. For example, hyphenation of words containing umlauts (like the famous German word Fr\"aulein) will work only if you use the T1~encoding. Unfortunately, the EC fonts, that is, the T1-encoded Computer Modern fonts, are distributed on small installations just as MetaFont sources and only have bitmap renditions of each glyph. For this reason, using the T1-encoded EC fonts on such small installations will produce \pdf\ files that render poorly.
 
-MiK\TeX\ (for Windows platforms) and \texttt{teTeX} for
-\textsc{unix}\slash Linux can be installed with different levels of
-completeness. Concerning the Computer Modern fonts, the following
-packages can be installed: |cm-super| fonts, |lmodern| (Latin Modern)
-fonts, and |lgc| fonts, the latter containing the Latin, Greek, and
-Cyrillic alphabets. Concerning other fonts,  the |txfonts| and
-|pxfonts| are two extended sets of the Times and the Palatino
-PostScript fonts, both packages containing extended sets of
-mathematical glyphs. Most other standard PostScript fonts are also
-available in T1~encoding.
+\TeX\ Live (cross-platform; replaced older \texttt{teTeX} for \textsc{unix}\slash Linux) and MiK\TeX\ (for Windows platforms) can be installed with different levels of completeness. Concerning the Computer Modern fonts, the following packages can be installed: |cm-super| fonts, |lmodern| (Latin Modern) fonts, and |lgc| fonts, the latter containing the Latin, Greek, and Cyrillic alphabets. Concerning other fonts, the |txfonts| and |pxfonts| are two extended sets of the Times and the Palatino PostScript fonts, both packages containing extended sets of mathematical glyphs. Most other standard PostScript fonts are also available in T1~encoding.
 
-Among the packages that make available the Computer Modern fonts in the
-T1~encoding, the package |lmodern| may be suggested. If you use
-|lmodern|, several extra fonts become available (like a sans-serif
-boldface math) and extra symbols (like proper guillemots).
+Among the packages that make available the Computer Modern fonts in the T1~encoding, the package |lmodern| may be suggested. If you use |lmodern|, several extra fonts become available (like a sans-serif boldface math) and extra symbols (like proper guillemots).
 
-To select the T1 encoding, use \verb|\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}|. Thus, if you
-have the LM~fonts installed, you could write
+To select the T1 encoding, use \verb|\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}|. Thus, if you have the LM~fonts installed, you could write
 \begin{verbatim}
 \usepackage{lmodern}
 \usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
 \end{verbatim}
-to get beautiful outline fonts and correct hyphenation. Note, however, that
-certain older versions of the LM~bundle did not include correct glyphs
-for ligatures like ``fi,'' which may cause trouble. Double check
-that all ligatures are displayed correctly and, if not, update.
-
-
+to get beautiful outline fonts and correct hyphenation. Note, however, that certain older versions of the LM~bundle did not include correct glyphs for ligatures like ``fi,'' which may cause trouble. Double check that all ligatures are displayed correctly and, if not, update.
 
 
 \subsection{Changing the Fonts Used for Different Elements of a Presentation}
 
 \subsubsection{Overview of Beamer's Font Management}
 
-\beamer's font mechanism is somewhat similar to \beamer's color
-mechanism, but not quite the same. As for colors, every \beamer\
-element, like the frame titles, the document title, the footnotes, and
-so on has a certain \beamer-font. As for colors, on the one hand you
-can specify the font of each element individually; on the other hand
-fonts also use inheritance, thereby making it easy to globally change
-the fonts used for, say, ``titlelike things'' or for ``itemizelike
-things.''
+\beamer's font mechanism is somewhat similar to \beamer's color mechanism, but not quite the same. As for colors, every \beamer\ element, like the frame titles, the document title, the footnotes, and so on has a certain \beamer-font. As for colors, on the one hand you can specify the font of each element individually; on the other hand fonts also use inheritance, thereby making it easy to globally change the fonts used for, say, ``titlelike things'' or for ``itemizelike things.''
 
-While a \beamer-color has a certain foreground and a certain
-background, either of which may be empty, a \beamer-font has a size, a
-shape, a series, and a family, each of which may be empty. The
-inheritance relation among \beamer-fonts is not necessarily the same
-as between \beamer-colors, though I have tried to match them whenever
-possible.
+While a \beamer-color has a certain foreground and a certain background, either of which may be empty, a \beamer-font has a size, a shape, a series, and a family, each of which may be empty. The inheritance relation among \beamer-fonts is not necessarily the same as between \beamer-colors, though I have tried to match them whenever possible.
 
-Multiple inheritance plays a more important rule for
-fonts than it does for colors. A font might inherit the attributes of
-two different fonts. If one of them specifies that the font should be,
-say, boldface and the other specifies that the font should be, say,
-large, then the child font will be both large and bold.
+Multiple inheritance plays a more important rule for fonts than it does for colors. A font might inherit the attributes of two different fonts. If one of them specifies that the font should be, say, boldface and the other specifies that the font should be, say, large, then the child font will be both large and bold.
 
-As for fonts, the description of the font used for an element is given
-after the description of the element.
+As for fonts, the description of the font used for an element is given after the description of the element.
 
 
 \subsubsection{Using Beamer's Fonts}
 
-To use a \beamer-font, you can use the command
-|\usebeamerfont|. Inside the templates for elements, this command will
-(typically) have already been called for you, so you will only
-seldomly have to use this command.
+To use a \beamer-font, you can use the command |\usebeamerfont|. Inside the templates for elements, this command will (typically) have already been called for you, so you will only seldomly have to use this command.
 
 \begin{command}{\usebeamerfont\opt{|*|}\marg{beamer-font name}}
-  This command changes the current font to the font specified by the
-  \meta{beamer-font name}. The \meta{beamer-font name} can be a
-  not-too-fancyful text and may contain spaces. Typical examples are
-  |frametitle| or |section in toc| or |My Font 1|. \beamer-fonts can
-  have (and should) have the same name as \beamer-templates and
-  \beamer-colors.
+  This command changes the current font to the font specified by the \meta{beamer-font name}. The \meta{beamer-font name} can be a not-too-fancyful text and may contain spaces. Typical examples are |frametitle| or |section in toc| or |My Font 1|. \beamer-fonts can have (and should) have the same name as \beamer-templates and \beamer-colors.
 
   \example |\usebeamerfont{frametitle}|
+  In the unstarred version of this command, the font is changed according to the attributes specified in the \meta{beamer-font name}, but unspecified attributes remain unchanged. For example, if the font specifies that the font should be ``bold,'' but specifies nothing else, and if the current font is large, then |\usebeamerfont| causes the current font to become large and bold.
 
-  In the unstarred version of this command, the font is changed
-  according to the attributes specified in the \meta{beamer-font
-  name}, but unspecified attributes remain unchanged. For example, if
-  the font specifies that the font should be ``bold,'' but specifies
-  nothing else, and if the current font is large, then
-  |\usebeamerfont| causes the current font to become large and
-  bold.
-
-  In the starred version of this command, the font is first reset
-  before the font's attributes are applied. Thus, in the above example
-  of a \beamer-font having only the attribute ``boldface'' set, saying
-  |\usebeamerfont*| will \emph{always} cause the current font to
-  become a normal-size, normal-shape, bold, default-family font.
+  In the starred version of this command, the font is first reset before the font's attributes are applied. Thus, in the above example of a \beamer-font having only the attribute ``boldface'' set, saying |\usebeamerfont*| will \emph{always} cause the current font to become a normal-size, normal-shape, bold, default-family font.
 \end{command}
 
 
 As for \beamer-colors, there exists a central command for setting and
 changing \beamer-fonts.
 
-\begin{command}{\setbeamerfont\opt{|*|}\marg{beamer-font
-      name}\marg{attributes}}
-  This command sets or resets certain attributes of the \beamer-font
-  \meta{beamer-font name}. In the unstarred version, this command just
-  adds those attributes that have not been mentioned in a previous
-  call and overwrites those that have been mentioned. Thus, the
-  following two command blocks have the same effect:
+\begin{command}{\setbeamerfont\opt{|*|}\marg{beamer-font name}\marg{attributes}}
+  This command sets or resets certain attributes of the \beamer-font \meta{beamer-font name}. In the unstarred version, this command just adds those attributes that have not been mentioned in a previous call and overwrites those that have been mentioned. Thus, the following two command blocks have the same effect:
 
   \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 
 \setbeamerfont{frametitle}{size=\large,series=\bfseries}
 \end{verbatim}
-
-  In the starred version, the font attributes are first completely
-  reset, that is, set to be empty.
+  In the starred version, the font attributes are first completely reset, that is, set to be empty.
 
   The following \meta{attributes} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item \declare{|size=|\meta{size command}} sets the size
-    attribute of the \beamer font. The \meta{size command} should be a
-    normal \LaTeX-command used for setting the font size or it should
-    be empty. Useful commands include |\tiny|, |\scriptsize|,
-    |\footnotesize|, |\small|, |\normalsize|, |\large|, |\Large|,
-    |\huge|, and |\Huge|. \beamer\ also introduces the two font sizes
-    |\Tiny| and |\TINY| for \emph{really} small text. But you should
-    know \emph{exactly} what you are doing if you use them. You have
-    been warned.
+  \item \declare{|size=|\meta{size command}} sets the size attribute of the \beamer font. The \meta{size command} should be a normal \LaTeX-command used for setting the font size or it should be empty. Useful commands include |\tiny|, |\scriptsize|, |\footnotesize|, |\small|, |\normalsize|, |\large|, |\Large|, |\huge|, and |\Huge|. \beamer\ also introduces the two font sizes |\Tiny| and |\TINY| for \emph{really} small text. But you should know \emph{exactly} what you are doing if you use them. You have been warned.
 
-    Note that there is a different between
-    specifying an empty command and specifying |\normalsize|: Making
-    the size attribute ``empty'' means that the font size should not
-    be changed when this font is used, while specifying |\normalsize|
-    means that the size should be set to the normal size whenever this
-    font is used.
-  \item \declare{|size*=|\marg{size in pt}\marg{baselineskip}} sets
-    the size attribute of   the font to the given \meta{size in pt}
-    and the baseline skip to the given value. Note that, depending on
-    what  kind of font you use, not  all font sizes may be
-    available. Also,  certain font sizes are much less desirable than
-    other ones; the standard commands take care of choosing
-    appropriate sizes for you. Do not use this option unless you have
-    a good reason. This command has the same effect as
-    |size={\fontsize|\marg{size in pt}\marg{baselineskip}|}|.
-  \item \declare{|shape=|\meta{shape command}} sets the shape
-    attribute of the font. The command should be a command like
-    |\itshape|, |\slshape|, |\scshape|, or |\upshape|.
-  \item \declare{|shape*=|\marg{shape attribute abbreviation}} sets
-    the shape attribute of the font using the \LaTeX's abbreviations
-    for attributes. This command has the same effect as
-    |shape={\fontshape|\marg{shape attributes abbreviation}|}|.
-  \item \declare{|series=|\meta{series command}} sets the ``series''
-    attribute of the font. The command should be a command like
-    |\bfseries|.
-  \item \declare{|series*=|\marg{series attribute abbreviation}} has
-    the same effect as |series={\fontseries|\marg{series attributes
-        abbreviation}|}|.
-  \item \declare{|family=|\meta{family command}} sets the font family
-    attribute. The command should be a \LaTeX-font command like
-    |\rmfamily| or |\sffamily|.
-  \item \declare{|family*=|\marg{family name}} sets the font family
-    attribute to the given \meta{family name}. The command has the
-    same effect as |family={\fontfamily|\marg{family name}|}|. The
-    \meta{family name} is, normally, a somewhat cryptic abbreviation
-    of a font family name that installed somewhere on the system. For
-    example, the \meta{family name} for Times happens to be
-    |ptm|. No one can remember these names, so it's perfectly normal if
-    you have to look them up laboriously.
-  \item \declare{|parent=|\marg{parent list}} specifies a list of
-    parent fonts. When the \beamer-font is used, the parents are used
-    first. Thus, any font attributes set by one of the parents is
-    inherited by the \beamer-font, except if this attribute is
-    overwritten by the font.
+    Note that there is a different between specifying an empty command and specifying |\normalsize|: Making the size attribute ``empty'' means that the font size should not be changed when this font is used, while specifying |\normalsize| means that the size should be set to the normal size whenever this font is used.
+  \item \declare{|size*=|\marg{size in pt}\marg{baselineskip}} sets the size attribute of the font to the given \meta{size in pt} and the baseline skip to the given value. Note that, depending on what kind of font you use, not all font sizes may be available. Also, certain font sizes are much less desirable than other ones; the standard commands take care of choosing appropriate sizes for you. Do not use this option unless you have a good reason. This command has the same effect as |size={\fontsize|\marg{size in pt}\marg{baselineskip}|}|.
+  \item \declare{|shape=|\meta{shape command}} sets the shape attribute of the font. The command should be a command like |\itshape|, |\slshape|, |\scshape|, or |\upshape|.
+  \item \declare{|shape*=|\marg{shape attribute abbreviation}} sets the shape attribute of the font using the \LaTeX's abbreviations for attributes. This command has the same effect as |shape={\fontshape|\marg{shape attributes abbreviation}|}|.
+  \item \declare{|series=|\meta{series command}} sets the ``series'' attribute of the font. The command should be a command like |\bfseries|.
+  \item \declare{|series*=|\marg{series attribute abbreviation}} has the same effect as |series={\fontseries|\marg{series attributes abbreviation}|}|.
+  \item \declare{|family=|\meta{family command}} sets the font family attribute. The command should be a \LaTeX-font command like |\rmfamily| or |\sffamily|.
+  \item \declare{|family*=|\marg{family name}} sets the font family attribute to the given \meta{family name}. The command has the same effect as |family={\fontfamily|\marg{family name}|}|. The \meta{family name} is, normally, a somewhat cryptic abbreviation of a font family name that installed somewhere on the system. For example, the \meta{family name} for Times happens to be |ptm|. No one can remember these names, so it's perfectly normal if you have to look them up laboriously.
+  \item \declare{|parent=|\marg{parent list}} specifies a list of parent fonts. When the \beamer-font is used, the parents are used first. Thus, any font attributes set by one of the parents is inherited by the \beamer-font, except if this attribute is overwritten by the font.
   \end{itemize}
 
   \example
 This text is small and bold.
 \end{verbatim}
 \end{command}
-
-
-
-

doc/beamerug-installation.tex

 
 \label{section-installation}
 
-There are different ways of installing the \beamer\ class, depending
-on your installation and needs. When installing the class, you may
-have to install some other packages as well as described below. Before
-installing, you may wish to review the licenses under
-which the class is distributed, see Section~\ref{section-license}.
+There are different ways of installing the \beamer\ class, depending on your installation and needs. When installing the class, you may have to install some other packages as well as described below. Before installing, you may wish to review the licenses under which the class is distributed, see Section~\ref{section-license}.
 
-Fortunately, most likely your system will already have \beamer\
-preinstalled, so you can skip this section.
+Fortunately, most likely your system will already have \beamer\ preinstalled, so you can skip this section.
 
 
 \subsection{Versions and Dependencies}
 
-This documentation is part of version \version\ of the \beamer\
-class. \beamer\ needs a reasonably recent version of several standard
-packages to run and also the following versions of two special
-packages (later versions should work, but not necessarily):
+This documentation is part of version \beamerugversion\ of the \beamer\ class. \beamer\ needs a reasonably recent version of several standard packages to run and also the following versions of two special packages (later versions should work, but not necessarily):
 \begin{itemize}
 \item
-  |pgf.sty| version \pgfversion,
+  |pgf.sty| version \beamerugpgfversion,
 \item
-  |xcolor.sty| version \xcolorversion.
+  |xcolor.sty| version \beamerugxcolorversion.
 \end{itemize}
 
 If you use |pdflatex| or |lyx|, which are optional, you need
 \end{itemize}
 
 
+\subsection{Installation of Pre-bundled Packages}
 
-\subsection{Installation of Prebundled Packages}
+We do not create or manage pre-bundled packages of \beamer, but, fortunately, other nice people do. We cannot give detailed instructions on how to install these packages, since we do not manage them, but we \emph{can} tell you were to find them and we can tell you what these nice people told us on how to install them. If you have a problem with installing, you might wish to have a look at the following first.
 
-I do not create or manage prebundled packages of \beamer, but,
-fortunately, nice other people do. I cannot give detailed instructions
-on how to install these packages, since I do not manage them, but I
-\emph{can} tell you were to find them and I can tell you what these
-nice people told me on how to install them. If you have a problem with
-installing, you might wish to have a look at the Debian page or MikTeX
-page first.
 
+\subsubsection{\TeX\ Live and Mac\TeX}
 
-\subsubsection{Debian}
+In \TeX\ Live, use the |tlmgr| tool to install the packages called |beamer|, |pgf|, and |xcolor|. If you have a fairly recent version of \TeX\ Live, and you have done full installation, beamer is included.
 
-The command ``|aptitude install latex-beamer|'' should do the
-trick. If necessary, the packages |pgf| and |latex-xcolor| will be
-automatically installed. Sit back and relax. In detail, the following
-packages are installed:
+\subsubsection{MiK\TeX and pro\TeX t}
+
+For MiK\TeX and pro\TeX t, use the update wizard or package manager to install the (latest versions of the) packages called |beamer|, |pgf|, and |xcolor|.
+
+\subsubsection{Debian and Ubuntu}
+
+The command ``|aptitude install latex-beamer|'' should do the trick. If necessary, the packages |pgf| and |latex-xcolor| will be automatically installed. Sit back and relax. In detail, the following packages are installed:
 \begin{verbatim}
 http://packages.debian.org/latex-beamer
 http://packages.debian.org/pgf
 http://packages.debian.org/latex-xcolor
 \end{verbatim}
+Debian 5.0 ``lenny'' includes \TeX\ Live 2007, and version 6.0 ``squeeze'' will include \TeX\ Live 2009. This also allows you to manually install newer versions of \beamer (into your local directory, see below) without having to update any other \LaTeX\ packages.
 
+Ubuntu 8.04, 9.04 and 9.10 include \TeX\ Live 2007, and version 10.04 includes \TeX\ Live 2009.
 
-\subsubsection{MiKTeX}
+\subsubsection{Fedora}
 
-For MiK\TeX, use the update wizard to install the (latest versions of
-the) packages called |latex-beamer|, |pgf|, and |xcolor|.
-
-
+Fedora 12 and 13 include \TeX\ Live 2007, which includes \beamer. It can be installed by running the command ``|aptitude install texlive-texmf-latex|''. Jindrich Novy provides |rpm| packages for newer versions of \TeX\ Live for Fedora 12 and 13, at
+\begin{verbatim}
+http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/TeXLive
+\end{verbatim}
+which will likely be a part of Fedora 14.
 
 
 \subsection{Installation in a texmf Tree}
 
-If, for whatever reason, you do not wish to use a prebundled package,
-the ``right'' way to install \beamer\ is to put it in a so-called
-|texmf| tree. In the following, I explain how to do this.
+If, for whatever reason, you do not wish to use a prebundled package, the ``right'' way to install \beamer\ is to put it in a so-called |texmf| tree. In the following, we explain how to do this.
 
-Obtain the latest source version (ending |.tar.gz| or |.zip|) of the \beamer\
-package from
+Obtain the latest source version (ending |.tar.gz| or |.zip|) of the \beamer\ package from
 \begin{verbatim}
-http://sourceforge.net/projects/latex-beamer/
+http://bitbucket.org/rivanvx/beamer
 \end{verbatim}
-(most likely, you have already done this). Next, you also need the
-\textsc{pgf} package and the \textsc{xcolor} packages,
-which you need to install separately (see their installation
-instructions).
+(most likely, you have already done this). Next, you also need the \textsc{pgf} package and the \textsc{xcolor} packages, which you need to install separately (see their installation instructions).
 
-The package contains a bunch of files; |beamer.cls| is one of
-these files and happens to be the most important one. You now need to
-put these files in an appropriate |texmf| tree.
+The package contains a bunch of files; |beamer.cls| is one of these files and happens to be the most important one. You now need to put these files in an appropriate |texmf| tree.
 
-When you ask \TeX\ to use a certain class or package, it usually looks
-for the necessary files in so-called |texmf| trees. These trees
-are simply huge directories that contain these files. By default,
-\TeX\ looks for files in three different |texmf| trees:
+When you ask \TeX\ to use a certain class or package, it usually looks for the necessary files in so-called |texmf| trees. These trees are simply huge directories that contain these files. By default, \TeX\ looks for files in three different |texmf| trees:
 \begin{itemize}
 \item
-  The root |texmf| tree, which is usually located at
-  |/usr/share/texmf/|, |c:\texmf\|, or\\
-  |c:\Program Files\TeXLive\texmf\|.
+  The root |texmf| tree, which is usually located at |/usr/share/texmf/|, |/usr/local/texlive/texmf/|, |c:\texmf\|, or\\ |c:\texlive\texmf\|.
 \item
-  The local  |texmf| tree, which is usually located at
-  |/usr/local/share/texmf/|, |c:\localtexmf\|, or\\
-  |c:\Program Files\TeXLive\texmf-local\|.
+  The local  |texmf| tree, which is usually located at |/usr/local/share/texmf/|, |/usr/local/texlive/texmf-local/| |c:\localtexmf\|, or\\ |c:\texlive\texmf-local\|.
 \item
-  Your personal  |texmf| tree, which is usually located in your home
-  directory at |~/texmf/| or |~/Library/texmf/|.
+  Your personal |texmf| tree, which is usually located in your home directory at |~/texmf/| or |~/Library/texmf/|.
 \end{itemize}
 
-You should install the packages either in the local tree or in
-your personal tree, depending on whether you have write access to the
-local tree. Installation in the root tree can cause problems, since an
-update of the whole \TeX\ installation will replace this whole tree.
+You should install the packages either in the local tree or in your personal tree, depending on whether you have write access to the local tree. Installation in the root tree can cause problems, since an update of the whole \TeX\ installation will replace this whole tree.
 
-Inside whatever |texmf| directory you have chosen, create
-the sub-sub-sub-directory
+Inside whatever |texmf| directory you have chosen, create the sub-sub-sub-directory
 \begin{verbatim}
 texmf/tex/latex/beamer
 \end{verbatim}
 and place all files of the package in this directory.
 
-Finally, you need to rebuild \TeX's filename database. This is done by
-running the command  |texhash| or |mktexlsr| (they are
-the same). In MiK\TeX, there is a menu option to do this.
+Finally, you need to rebuild \TeX's filename database. This is done by running the command |texhash| or |mktexlsr| (they are the same). In MiK\TeX package manager and \TeX\ Live |tlmgr|, there is a menu option to do this.
 
 \lyxnote
-For usage of the \beamer\ class with \LyX, you have to do all of the
-above. You also have to make \LyX\ aware of the file
-|beamer.layout|. This file is \emph{not part of the beamer package}
-since it is updated and managed by the \LyX\ development team. This
-means that in reasonably up-to-date \LyX\ versions this file will
-already be installed and nothing needs to be done.
+For usage of the \beamer\ class with \LyX, you have to do all of the above. You also have to make \LyX\ aware of the file |beamer.layout|. This file is \emph{not part of the beamer package} since it is updated and managed by the \LyX\ development team. This means that in reasonably up-to-date \LyX\ versions this file will already be installed and nothing needs to be done.
 
 \vskip1em
-For a more detailed explanation of the standard installation process
-of packages, you might wish to consult
-\href{http://www.ctan.org/installationadvice/}{|http://www.ctan.org/installationadvice/|}.
-However, note that the \beamer\ package does not come with a
-|.ins| file (simply skip that part).
-
-
+For a more detailed explanation of the standard installation process of packages, you might wish to consult \href{http://www.ctan.org/installationadvice/}{|http://www.ctan.org/installationadvice/|}. However, note that the \beamer\ package does not come with a |.ins| file (simply skip that part).
 
 
 \subsection{Updating the Installation}
 
-To update your installation from a previous version, simply replace
-everything in the directory
+To update your installation from a previous version, simply replace everything in the directory
 \begin{verbatim}
 texmf/tex/latex/beamer
 \end{verbatim}
-with the files of the new version. The easiest way to do this is to
-first delete the old version and then to proceed as described above.
+with the files of the new version. The easiest way to do this is to first delete the old version and then to proceed as described above.
+
+Note that if you have two versions installed, one in |texmf| and other in |texmf-local| directory, \TeX\ distribution will prefer one in |texmf-local| directory. This generally allows you to update packages manually without administrator privileges.
 
 
 \subsection{Testing the Installation}
 
-To test your installation, copy the file
-|generic-ornate-15min-45min.en.tex| from the directory
+To test your installation, copy the file |generic-ornate-15min-45min.en.tex| from the directory
 \begin{verbatim}
 beamer/solutions/generic-talks
 \end{verbatim}
-to some place where you usually
-create presentations. Then run the command |pdflatex| several times on
-the file and check whether the resulting \textsc{pdf} file looks
-correct. If so, you are all set.
+to some place where you usually create presentations. Then run the command |pdflatex| several times on the file and check whether the resulting \textsc{pdf} file looks correct. If so, you are all set.
 
 \lyxnote
-To test the \LyX\ installation, create a new file from the
-template |generic-ornate-15min-45min.en.lyx|, which is located in the directory
-|beamer/solutions/generic-talks|.
+To test the \LyX\ installation, create a new file from the template |generic-ornate-15min-45min.en.lyx|, which is located in the directory |beamer/solutions/generic-talks|.
 
 
 \input{beamerug-compatibility}
-

doc/beamerug-introduction.tex

 
 \section{Introduction}
 
-\beamer\ is a \LaTeX\ class for creating presentations that are
-held using a projector, but it can also be used to create transparency
-slides. Preparing presentations with \beamer\ is different from
-preparing them with \textsc{wysiwyg} programs like OpenOffice.org's Impress,
-Apple's Keynotes, or KOffice's KPresenter. A \beamer\ presentation is
-created like any other \LaTeX\ document: It has a preamble and a body,
-the body contains |\section|s and |\subsection|s, the different
-slides (called \emph{frames} in \beamer) are put in environments, they
-are structured using |itemize| and |enumerate| environments, and so
-on. The obvious disadvantage of this approach is that you have to know
-\LaTeX\ in order to use \beamer. The advantage is that if you know
-\LaTeX, you can use your knowledge of \LaTeX\ also when creating a
-presentation, not only when writing papers.
+\beamer\ is a \LaTeX\ class for creating presentations that are held using a projector, but it can also be used to create transparency slides. Preparing presentations with \beamer\ is different from preparing them with \textsc{wysiwyg} programs like OpenOffice.org's Impress, Apple's Keynotes, or KOffice's KPresenter. A \beamer\ presentation is created like any other \LaTeX\ document: It has a preamble and a body, the body contains |\section|s and |\subsection|s, the different slides (called \emph{frames} in \beamer) are put in environments, they are structured using |itemize| and |enumerate| environments, and so on. The obvious disadvantage of this approach is that you have to know \LaTeX\ in order to use \beamer. The advantage is that if you know \LaTeX, you can use your knowledge of \LaTeX\ also when creating a presentation, not only when writing papers.
 
 
 \subsection{Main Features}
 
-The list of features supported by \beamer\ is quite long
-(unfortunately, so is presumably the list of bugs supported by
-\beamer). The most important features, in my opinion, are:
+The list of features supported by \beamer\ is quite long (unfortunately, so is presumably the list of bugs supported by \beamer). The most important features, in our opinion, are:
 \begin{itemize}
 \item
-  You can use \beamer\ both with |pdflatex| and |latex|+|dvips|.
+  You can use \beamer\ with |pdflatex|, |xelatex|, |lualatex| and |latex|+|dvips|.
 \item
-  The standard commands of \LaTeX\ still work. A |\tableofcontents| will
-  still create a table of contents, |\section| is still used to create
-  structure, and |itemize| still creates a list.
+  The standard commands of \LaTeX\ still work. A |\tableofcontents| will still create a table of contents, |\section| is still used to create structure, and |itemize| still creates a list.
 \item
   You can easily create overlays and dynamic effects.
 \item
-  Themes allow you to change the appearance of your presentation to
-  suit your purposes.
+  Themes allow you to change the appearance of your presentation to suit your purposes.
 \item
-  The themes are designed to be usable in practice, they are not just
-  for show. You will not find such nonsense as a green body text on
-  a picture of a green meadow.
+  The themes are designed to be usable in practice, they are not just for show. You will not find such nonsense as a green body text on a picture of a green meadow.
 \item
-  The layout, the colors, and the fonts used in a presentation can
-  easily be changed globally, but you still also have control over
-  the most minute detail.
+  The layout, the colors, and the fonts used in a presentation can easily be changed globally, but you still also have control over the most minute detail.
 \item
-  A special style file allows you to use the \LaTeX-source of a
-  presentation directly in other \LaTeX\ classes like |article| or
-  |book|. This makes it easy to create presentations out of lecture
-  notes or lecture notes out of presentations.
+  A special style file allows you to use the \LaTeX-source of a presentation directly in other \LaTeX\ classes like |article| or |book|. This makes it easy to create presentations out of lecture notes or lecture notes out of presentations.
 \item
-  The final output is typically a \textsc{pdf}-file. Viewer
-  applications for this format exist for virtually every
-  platform. When bringing your presentation to a conference on a
-  memory stick, you do not have to worry about which version of the
-  presentation program might be installed there. Also, your
-  presentation is going to look exactly the way it looked on your
-  computer.
+  The final output is typically a \textsc{pdf}-file. Viewer applications for this format exist for virtually every platform. When bringing your presentation to a conference on a memory stick, you do not have to worry about which version of the presentation program might be installed there. Also, your presentation is going to look exactly the way it looked on your computer.
 \end{itemize}
 
 
-
-
 \subsection{History}
 
-I created \beamer\ mainly in my spare time. Many other people have
-helped by sending me emails containing suggestions for improvement or
-corrections or patches or whole new themes (by now I have received over a
-thousand emails concerning \beamer). Indeed, most of the
-development was only initiated by feature requests and bug
-reports. Without this feedback, \beamer\ would still be what it was
-originally intended to be: a small private collection of macros that
-make using the |seminar| class easier. I created the first version of
-\beamer\ for my PhD defense presentation in February 2003. A month
-later, I put the package on \textsc{ctan} at the request of some
-colleagues. After that, things somehow got out of hand.
+Till Tantau created \beamer\ mainly in his spare time. Many other people have helped by sending him emails containing suggestions for improvement or corrections or patches or whole new themes (by now, this amounts to over a thousand emails concerning \beamer). Indeed, most of the development was only initiated by feature requests and bug reports. Without this feedback, \beamer\ would still be what it was originally intended to be: a small private collection of macros that make using the |seminar| class easier. Till created the first version of \beamer\ for his PhD defense presentation in February 2003. A month later, he put the package on \textsc{ctan} at the request of some colleagues. After that, things somehow got out of hand.
 
+After being unmaintained since 2007, in April 2010 Till handed over the maintenance to Joseph Wright and Vedran Mileti\'c, who are maintaining it still.
 
 
 \subsection{Acknowledgments}
 
-Where to begin? \beamer's development depends not only on me, but on
-the feedback I get from other people. Many features have been
-implemented because someone requested them and I thought that these
-features would be nice to have and reasonably easy to implement. Other
-people have given valuable feedback on themes, on the user's guide,
-on features of the class, on the internals of the implementation, on
-special \LaTeX\ features, and on life in general. A small selection of
-these people includes (in no particular order and I have surely
-forgotten to name lots of people who really, really deserve being in
-this list): Carsten (for everything), Birgit (for being the first
-person to use \beamer\ besides me), Tux (for his silent criticism),
-Rolf Niepraschk (for showing me how to program \LaTeX\ correctly),
-Claudio Beccari (for writing part of the documentation  on font
-encodings), Thomas Baumann (for the emacs stuff), Stefan M\"uller (for
-not loosing hope), Uwe Kern (for \textsc{xcolor}), Hendri Adriaens
-(for \textsc{ha-prosper}), Ohura Makoto (for spotting typos). People
-who have contributed to the themes include Paul Gomme, Manuel Carro,
-and Marlon R�gis Schmitz.
+Till Tantau: \emph{``Where to begin? \beamer's development depends not only on me, but on the feedback I get from other people. Many features have been implemented because someone requested them and I thought that these features would be nice to have and reasonably easy to implement. Other people have given valuable feedback on themes, on the user's guide, on features of the class, on the internals of the implementation, on special \LaTeX\ features, and on life in general. A small selection of these people includes (in no particular order and I have surely forgotten to name lots of people who really, really deserve being in this list): Carsten (for everything), Birgit (for being the first person to use \beamer\ besides me), Tux (for his silent criticism), Rolf Niepraschk (for showing me how to program \LaTeX\ correctly), Claudio Beccari (for writing part of the documentation  on font encodings), Thomas Baumann (for the emacs stuff), Stefan M\"uller (for not loosing hope), Uwe Kern (for \textsc{xcolor}), Hendri Adriaens (for \textsc{ha-prosper}), Ohura Makoto (for spotting typos). People who have contributed to the themes include Paul Gomme, Manuel Carro, and Marlon R\'egis Schmitz.''}
 
+Joseph Wright: \emph{``I would like to thank \dots''}
 
-
-
+Vedran Mileti\'c: \emph{``First, I would like to thank Karl Berry and Sanda Buja\v ci\'c for encouragement, without which I wouldn't ever be anything but a \LaTeX\ user. I would also like to thank Ana Me\v strovi\'c, my colleague, who was excited by the prospect of using beamer for preparing class material; Mladen Bo\v cev, Ivona Frankovi\'c, Marina Rajnovi\'c, Ivana \v Sari\'c, Danijela Suboti\'c, Emma Bla\v zevi\'c and Valter Pope\v ski\'c, my students at Department of Informatics, who were the first to hear about \LaTeX, \beamer\ and how it can help in preparing class material. Last, but certainly not least, I owe a lot to Joseph Wright for developing \textsc{siunitx} and for helping develop \beamer.''}
 
 
 \subsection{How to Read this User's Guide}
 
-You should start with the first part. If you have not yet installed
-the package, please read Section~\ref{section-installation} first. If
-you are new to \beamer, you should next read the tutorial in
-Section~\ref{section-tutorial}. When you sit down to create your first
-real presentation using \beamer, read Section~\ref{section-workflow}
-where the technical details of a possible workflow are
-discussed. If you are still new to creating presentations in general, you
-might find Section~\ref{section-guidelines} helpful, where many
-guidelines are given on what to do and what not to do. Finally, you
-should browse through Section~\ref{section-solutions}, where you will
-find ready-to-use solution templates for creating talks, possibly even
-in the language you intend to use.
+You should start with the first part. If you have not yet installed the package, please read Section~\ref{section-installation} first. If you are new to \beamer, you should next read the tutorial in Section~\ref{section-tutorial}. When you sit down to create your first real presentation using \beamer, read Section~\ref{section-workflow} where the technical details of a possible workflow are discussed. If you are still new to creating presentations in general, you might find Section~\ref{section-guidelines} helpful, where many guidelines are given on what to do and what not to do. Finally, you should browse through Section~\ref{section-solutions}, where you will find ready-to-use solution templates for creating talks, possibly even in the language you intend to use.
 
-The second part of this user's guide goes into the details of all the
-commands defined in \beamer, but it also addresses  other technical
-issues having to do with creating presentations (like how to include
-graphics or animations).
+The second part of this user's guide goes into the details of all the commands defined in \beamer, but it also addresses  other technical issues having to do with creating presentations (like how to include graphics or animations).
 
-The third part explains how you can change the appearance of your
-presentation easily either using themes or by specifying colors or
-fonts for specific elements of a presentation (like, say, the font
-used for the numbers in an enumeration).
+The third part explains how you can change the appearance of your presentation easily either using themes or by specifying colors or fonts for specific elements of a presentation (like, say, the font used for the numbers in an enumeration).
 
-The last part contains ``howtos,'' which are explanations of how to
-get certain things done using \beamer.
+The last part contains ``howtos,'' which are explanations of how to get certain things done using \beamer.
 
 \medskip
 \noindent
-This user's guide contains descriptions of all ``public''
-commands, environments, and concepts defined by the \beamer-class. The
-following examples show how things are documented. As a general rule,
-red text is \emph{defined}, green text is \emph{optional}, blue text
-indicates special mode considerations.
+This user's guide contains descriptions of all ``public'' commands, environments, and concepts defined by the \beamer-class. The following examples show how things are documented. As a general rule, red text is \emph{defined}, green text is \emph{optional}, blue text indicates special mode considerations.
 
 \begingroup
 \noindexing
-\begin{command}{\somebeamercommand\oarg{optional arguments}\marg{first
-      argument}\marg{second argument}}
-  Here you will find the explanation of what the command
-  |\somebeamercommand| does. The green argument(s) is optional. The
-  command of this example takes two parameters.
+\begin{command}{\somebeamercommand\oarg{optional arguments}\marg{first argument}\marg{second argument}}
+  Here you will find the explanation of what the command |\somebeamercommand| does. The green argument(s) is optional. The command of this example takes two parameters.
 
   \example
   |\somebeamercommand[opt]{my arg}{xxx}|
 \end{command}
 
-\begin{environment}{{somebeamerenvironment}\oarg{optional arguments}\marg{first
-      argument}}
-  Here you will find the explanation of the effect of the environment
-  |somebeamerenvironment|. As with commands, the green arguments are
-  optional.
+\begin{environment}{{somebeamerenvironment}\oarg{optional arguments}\marg{first argument}}
+  Here you will find the explanation of the effect of the environment |somebeamerenvironment|. As with commands, the green arguments are optional.
 
   \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \end{environment}
 
 \begin{element}{some beamer element}\yes\yes\yes
-  Here you will find an explanation of the template, color,
-  and/or font |some beamer element|.
-  A ``\beamer-element'' is a concept that is explained in more detail
-  in Section~\ref{section-elements}. Roughly speaking, an \emph{element}
-  is a part of a presentation that is potentially typeset in some
-  special way. Examples of elements are frame titles, the author's
-  name, or the footnote sign. For most elements there exists a
-  \emph{template}, see Section~\ref{section-elements} once more, and
-  also a \beamer-color and a \beamer-font.
+  Here you will find an explanation of the template, color, and/or font |some beamer element|. A ``\beamer-element'' is a concept that is explained in more detail in Section~\ref{section-elements}. Roughly speaking, an \emph{element} is a part of a presentation that is potentially typeset in some special way. Examples of elements are frame titles, the author's name, or the footnote sign. For most elements there exists a \emph{template}, see Section~\ref{section-elements} once more, and also a \beamer-color and a \beamer-font.
 
-  For each element, it is indicated whether a template, a
-  \beamer-color, and/or a \beamer-font of the
-  name |some beamer element| exist. Typically, all three exist and are
-  employed together when the element needs to be typeset, that is,
-  when the template is inserted the \beamer-color and -font are
-  installed first. However, sometimes templates do not have a color or
-  font associated with them (like parent templates). Also, there exist
-  \beamer-colors and -fonts that do not have an underlying template.
+  For each element, it is indicated whether a template, a \beamer-color, and/or a \beamer-font of the name |some beamer element| exist. Typically, all three exist and are employed together when the element needs to be typeset, that is, when the template is inserted the \beamer-color and -font are installed first. However, sometimes templates do not have a color or font associated with them (like parent templates). Also, there exist \beamer-colors and -fonts that do not have an underlying template.
 
-  Using and changing templates is explained in
-  Section~\ref{section-templates}. Here is the essence: To change a
-  template, you can say
+  Using and changing templates is explained in Section~\ref{section-templates}. Here is the essence: To change a template, you can say
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamertemplate{some beamer element}{your definition for this template}
 \end{verbatim}
-  Unfortunately, it is not quite trivial to come up with a good definition for
-  some templates. Fortunately, there are often \emph{predefined options}
-  for a template. These are indicated like this:
+  Unfortunately, it is not quite trivial to come up with a good definition for some templates. Fortunately, there are often \emph{predefined options} for a template. These are indicated like this:
   \begin{itemize}
     \itemoption{square}{}
     causes a small square to be used to render the template.
 %% New a circle is used
 \end{verbatim}
 
-  \beamer-colors are explained in Section~\ref{section-colors}. Here
-  is the essence: To change the foreground of the color to, say, red, use
+  \beamer-colors are explained in Section~\ref{section-colors}. Here is the essence: To change the foreground of the color to, say, red, use
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamercolor{some beamer element}{fg=red}
 \end{verbatim}
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamercolor{some beamer element}{bg=black}
 \end{verbatim}
-  You can also change them together using |fg=red,bg=black|. The
-  background will not always be ``honoured,'' since it is difficult to
-  show a colored background correctly and an extra effort must be made
-  by the templates (while the foreground color is usually used
-  automatically).
+  You can also change them together using |fg=red,bg=black|. The background will not always be ``honoured,'' since it is difficult to show a colored background correctly and an extra effort must be made by the templates (while the foreground color is usually used automatically).
 
-  \beamer-fonts are explained in Section~\ref{section-fonts}. Here is
-  the essence: To change the size of the font to, say, large, use:
+  \beamer-fonts are explained in Section~\ref{section-fonts}. Here is the essence: To change the size of the font to, say, large, use:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamerfont{some beamer element}{size=\large}
 \end{verbatim}
-  In addition to the size, you can use things like |series=\bfseries|
-  to set the series, |shape=\itshape| to change the shape,
-  |family=\sffamily| to change the family, and you can use them in
-  conjunction. Add a star to the command to first ``reset'' the font.
+  In addition to the size, you can use things like |series=\bfseries| to set the series, |shape=\itshape| to change the shape, |family=\sffamily| to change the family, and you can use them in conjunction. Add a star to the command to first ``reset'' the font.
 \end{element}
 
-
 \beamernote
-As next to this paragraph, you will sometimes find the word
-\textsc{presentation} in blue next to some paragraph. This means that
-the paragraph applies only when you ``normally typeset your
-presentation using \LaTeX\ or pdf\LaTeX.''
+As next to this paragraph, you will sometimes find the word \textsc{presentation} in blue next to some paragraph. This means that the paragraph applies only when you ``normally typeset your presentation using \LaTeX\ or pdf\LaTeX.''
 
 \articlenote
-Opposed to this, a paragraph with \textsc{article} next to it
-describes some behaviour that is special for the |article| mode. This
-special mode is used to create lecture notes out of a presentation
-(the two can coexist in one file).
+Opposed to this, a paragraph with \textsc{article} next to it describes some behaviour that is special for the |article| mode. This special mode is used to create lecture notes out of a presentation (the two can coexist in one file).
 
 \lyxnote
-A paragraph with \textsc{lyx} next to it describes behaviour that is
-special when you use \LyX\ to prepare your presentation.
+A paragraph with \textsc{lyx} next to it describes behaviour that is special when you use \LyX\ to prepare your presentation.
 \endgroup
 
 
-
 \subsection{Getting Help}
 
 When you need help with \beamer, please do the following:
 
 \begin{enumerate}
 \item
-  Read the manual, at least the part that has to do with your problem.
+  Read the user guide, at least the part that has to do with your problem.
 \item
-  If that does not solve the problem, try having a look at the
-  sourceforge development page for \beamer\ (see the
-  title of this document). Perhaps someone has already reported a
-  similar problem and someone has found a solution.
+  If that does not solve the problem, try having a look at the bitbucket development page for \beamer\ (see the title of this document). Perhaps someone has already reported a similar problem and someone has found a solution.
 \item
-  On the website you will find numerous forums for getting
-  help. There, you can write to help forums, file bug reports, join
-  mailing lists, and so on.
+  On the website you will find numerous links to forums and mailing lists for getting help. There, you can write to help forums, file bug reports, join mailing lists, and so on.
 \item
-  Before you file a bug report, especially a bug report concerning the
-  installation, make sure that this is really a bug. In particular,
-  have a look at the |.log| file that results when you \TeX\ your
-  files. This |.log| file should show that all the right files are
-  loaded from the right directories. Nearly all installation problems
-  can be resolved by looking at the |.log| file.
+  Before you file a bug report, especially a bug report concerning the installation, make sure that this is really a bug. In particular, have a look at the |.log| file that results when you \TeX\ your files. This |.log| file should show that all the right files are loaded from the right directories. Nearly all installation problems can be resolved by looking at the |.log| file.
+
+  If you can, before reporting the bug, retest using latest version of \beamer with latest version of \TeX\ Live.
 \item
-  \emph{As a last resort} you can try to email me (the author). I do
-  not mind getting emails, I simply get way too many of them. Because
-  of this, I cannot guarantee that your emails will be answered timely
-  or even at all. Your chances that your problem will be fixed are
-  somewhat higher if you mail to the \beamer\ mailing list
-  (naturally, I read this list and answer questions when I have the
-  time).
+  \emph{As a last resort} you can try emailing authors. We do not mind getting emails, we simply get way too many of them. Because of this, we cannot guarantee that your emails will be answered timely or even at all. Your chances that your problem will be fixed are somewhat higher if you mail to the \beamer\ mailing list linked at bitbucket development page (naturally, we read this list and answer questions when we have the time).
 \item
-  Please, do not phone me in my office. If you need a hotline, buy a
-  commercial product.
+  Please, do not phone authors in the office. If you need a hotline, buy a commercial product.
 \end{enumerate}
-
-
-

doc/beamerug-themes.tex

 presentation. The \beamer\ class uses five different kinds of themes:
 \begin{description}
 \item[Presentation Themes]
-  Conceptually, a presentation theme dictates for every single detail
-  of a presentation what it looks like. Thus, choosing a particular
-  presentation theme will setup for, say, the numbers in enumeration
-  what color they have, what color their background has, what font is
-  used to render them, whether a circle or ball or rectangle or
-  whatever is drawn behind them, and so forth. Thus, when you choose
-  a presentation theme, your presentation will look the way someone
-  (the creator of the theme) thought that a presentation should look
-  like. Presentation themes typically only choose a particular color
-  theme, font theme, inner theme, and outer theme that go well
-  together.
+  Conceptually, a presentation theme dictates for every single detail of a presentation what it looks like. Thus, choosing a particular presentation theme will setup for, say, the numbers in enumeration what color they have, what color their background has, what font is used to render them, whether a circle or ball or rectangle or whatever is drawn behind them, and so forth. Thus, when you choose a presentation theme, your presentation will look the way someone (the creator of the theme) thought that a presentation should look like. Presentation themes typically only choose a particular color theme, font theme, inner theme, and outer theme that go well together.
 \item[Color Themes]
-  A color theme only dictates which colors are used in a
-  presentation. If you have chosen a particular presentation theme
-  and then choose a color theme, only the colors of your presentation
-  will change. A color theme can specify colors in a very detailed
-  way: For example, a color theme can specifically change the colors
-  used to render, say, the border of a button, the background of a
-  button, and the text on a button.
+  A color theme only dictates which colors are used in a presentation. If you have chosen a particular presentation theme and then choose a color theme, only the colors of your presentation will change. A color theme can specify colors in a very detailed way: For example, a color theme can specifically change the colors used to render, say, the border of a button, the background of a button, and the text on a button.
 \item[Font Themes]
-  A font theme dictates which fonts or font attributes are used in a
-  presentation. As for colors, the font of all text elements used in a
-  presentation can be specified independently.
+  A font theme dictates which fonts or font attributes are used in a presentation. As for colors, the font of all text elements used in a presentation can be specified independently.
 \item[Inner Themes]
-  An inner theme specifies how certain elements of a
-  presentation are typeset. This includes all elements that are at the
-  ``inside'' of the frame, that is, that are not part of the headline,
-  footline, or sidebars. This includes all enumerations, itemize
-  environments, block environments, theorem environments, or the table of
-  contents. For example, an inner theme might
-  specify that in an enumeration the number should be typeset without
-  a dot and that a small circle should be shown behind it. The inner
-  theme would \emph{not} specify what color should be used for the
-  number or the circle (this is the job of the color theme) nor which font
-  should be used (this is the job of the font theme).
+  An inner theme specifies how certain elements of a presentation are typeset. This includes all elements that are at the ``inside'' of the frame, that is, that are not part of the headline, footline, or sidebars. This includes all enumerations, itemize environments, block environments, theorem environments, or the table of contents. For example, an inner theme might specify that in an enumeration the number should be typeset without a dot and that a small circle should be shown behind it. The inner theme would \emph{not} specify what color should be used for the number or the circle (this is the job of the color theme) nor which font should be used (this is the job of the font theme).
 \item[Outer Themes]
-  An outer theme specifies what the ``outside'' or ``border'' of the
-  presentation slides should look like. It specifies whether there are
-  head- and footlines, what is shown in them, whether there is a
-  sidebar, where the logo goes, where the navigation symbols and bars
-  go, and so on. It also specifies where the frametitle is put and how
-  it is typeset.
+  An outer theme specifies what the ``outside'' or ``border'' of the presentation slides should look like. It specifies whether there are head- and footlines, what is shown in them, whether there is a sidebar, where the logo goes, where the navigation symbols and bars go, and so on. It also specifies where the frametitle is put and how it is typeset.
 \end{description}
 
-The different themes reside in the five subdirectories |theme|, |color|,
-|font|, |inner|, and |outer| of the directory
-|beamer/themes|. Internally, a theme is stored as a normal style
-file. However, to use a theme, the following special commands should
-be used:
+The different themes reside in the five subdirectories |theme|, |color|, |font|, |inner|, and |outer| of the directory |beamer/themes|. Internally, a theme is stored as a normal style file. However, to use a theme, the following special commands should be used:
 
 \begin{command}{\usetheme\oarg{options}\marg{name list}}
-  Installs the presentation theme named \meta{name}. Currently, the
-  effect of this command is the same as saying |\usepackage| for the
-  style file named |beamertheme|\meta{name}|.sty| for each \meta{name}
-  in the \meta{name list}.
+  Installs the presentation theme named \meta{name}. Currently, the effect of this command is the same as saying |\usepackage| for the style file named |beamertheme|\meta{name}|.sty| for each \meta{name} in the \meta{name list}.
 \end{command}
 
 
 \begin{command}{\usecolortheme\oarg{options}\marg{name list}}
-  Same as |\usetheme|, only for color themes. Color style files
-  are named |beamercolortheme|\meta{name}|.sty|.
+  Same as |\usetheme|, only for color themes. Color style files are named |beamercolortheme|\meta{name}|.sty|.
 \end{command}
 
 \begin{command}{\usefonttheme\oarg{options}\marg{name}}
-  Same as |\usetheme|, only for font themes. Font style files
-  are named |beamerfonttheme|\meta{name}|.sty|.
+  Same as |\usetheme|, only for font themes. Font style files are named |beamerfonttheme|\meta{name}|.sty|.
 \end{command}
 
 \begin{command}{\useinnertheme\oarg{options}\marg{name}}
-  Same as |\usetheme|, only for inner themes. Inner style files
-  are named |beamerinnertheme|\meta{name}|.sty|.
+  Same as |\usetheme|, only for inner themes. Inner style files are named |beamerinnertheme|\meta{name}|.sty|.
 \end{command}
 
 \begin{command}{\useoutertheme\oarg{options}\marg{name}}
-  Same as |\usetheme|, only for outer themes. Outer style files
-  are named |beameroutertheme|\meta{name}|.sty|.
+  Same as |\usetheme|, only for outer themes. Outer style files are named |beameroutertheme|\meta{name}|.sty|.
 \end{command}
 
-If you do not use any of these commands, a sober \emph{default} theme
-is used for all of them. In the following, the presentation themes
-that come with the \beamer\ class are described. The element, layout,
-color, and font themes  are presented in the following sections.
-
+If you do not use any of these commands, a sober \emph{default} theme is used for all of them. In the following, the presentation themes that come with the \beamer\ class are described. The element, layout, color, and font themes  are presented in the following sections.
 
 
 \subsection{Presentation Themes without Navigation Bars}
 
-A presentation theme dictates for every single detail
-of a presentation what it looks like. Normally, having chosen a
-particular presentation theme, you do not need to specify anything
-else having to do with the appearance of your presentation---the
-creator of the theme should have taken care of that for you. However, you
-still \emph{can} change things afterward either by using a different
-color, font, element, or even layout theme; or by changing specific
-colors, fonts, or templates directly.
+A presentation theme dictates for every single detail of a presentation what it looks like. Normally, having chosen a particular presentation theme, you do not need to specify anything else having to do with the appearance of your presentation---the creator of the theme should have taken care of that for you. However, you still \emph{can} change things afterward either by using a different color, font, element, or even layout theme; or by changing specific colors, fonts, or templates directly.
 
-When I started naming the presentation themes, I soon ran out of ideas
-on how to call them. Instead of giving them more and more cumbersome
-names, I decided to switch to a different naming convention:
-Except for two special cases, all presentation themes are named after
-cities. These cities happen to be cities in which or near which there
-was a conference or workshop that I attended or that a
-co-author of mine attended.
+When I started naming the presentation themes, I soon ran out of ideas on how to call them. Instead of giving them more and more cumbersome names, I decided to switch to a different naming convention: Except for two special cases, all presentation themes are named after cities. These cities happen to be cities in which or near which there was a conference or workshop that I attended or that a co-author of mine attended.
 
-If a theme has not been developped by me (that is, if someone else is
-to blame), this is indicated with the theme. I have sometimes slightly
-changed or ``corrected'' submitted themes, but I still list the
-original authors.
-
+If a theme has not been developped by me (that is, if someone else is to blame), this is indicated with the theme. I have sometimes slightly changed or ``corrected'' submitted themes, but I still list the original authors.
 
 \begin{themeexample}{default}
-  As the name suggests, this theme is installed by default. It is a
-  sober no-nonsense theme that makes minimal use of color or font
-  variations. This theme is useful for all kinds of talks, except for
-  very long talks.
+  As the name suggests, this theme is installed by default. It is a sober no-nonsense theme that makes minimal use of color or font variations. This theme is useful for all kinds of talks, except for very long talks.
 \end{themeexample}
 
-
 \begin{themeexample}[{\opt{|[headheight=|\meta{head height}|,footheight=|\meta{foot height}|]|}}]{boxes}
-  For this theme, you can specify an arbitrary number of templates for
-  the boxes in the headline and in the footline. You can add a
-  template for another box by using the following commands.
+  For this theme, you can specify an arbitrary number of templates for the boxes in the headline and in the footline. You can add a template for another box by using the following commands.
 
   \begin{command}{\addheadbox\marg{beamer color}\marg{box template}}
-    Each time this command is invoked, a new box is added to the head
-    line, with the first added box being shown on the left. All boxes
-    will have the same size.
+    Each time this command is invoked, a new box is added to the head line, with the first added box being shown on the left. All boxes will have the same size.
 
-    The \meta{beamer color} will be used to setup the foreground and
-    background colors of the box.
+    The \meta{beamer color} will be used to setup the foreground and background colors of the box.
     \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \addheadbox{section in head/foot}{\tiny\quad 1. Box}
 \addheadbox{structure}{\tiny\quad 2. Box}
 \end{verbatim}
-
-    A similar effect as the above commands can be achieved by directly
-    installing a head template that contains two |beamercolorbox|es:
+    A similar effect as the above commands can be achieved by directly installing a head template that contains two |beamercolorbox|es:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamertemplate{headline}
 {\leavevmode
 \end{beamercolorbox}
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-    While being more complicated, the above commands offer more
-    flexibility.
+    While being more complicated, the above commands offer more flexibility.
   \end{command}
 
   \begin{command}{\addfootbox\marg{beamer color}\marg{box template}}
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{Bergen}
-  A theme based on the |inmargin| inner theme and the |rectangles|
-  inner theme. Using this theme is not quite trivial since getting the
-  spacing right can be trickier than with most other themes. Also, this
-  theme goes badly with columns. You may wish to consult the remarks
-  on the |inmargin| inner theme.
+  A theme based on the |inmargin| inner theme and the |rectangles| inner theme. Using this theme is not quite trivial since getting the spacing right can be trickier than with most other themes. Also, this theme goes badly with columns. You may wish to consult the remarks on the |inmargin| inner theme.
 
   Bergen is a town in Norway. It hosted \textsc{iwpec} 2004.
 \end{themeexample}
 
-
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{Boadilla}
-  A theme giving much information in little space.
-  The following \meta{options} may be given:
+  A theme giving much information in little space. The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item \declare{|secheader|} causes a headline to be inserted showing
-    the current section and subsection. By default, this
-    headline is not shown.
+  \item \declare{|secheader|} causes a headline to be inserted showing the current section and subsection. By default, this headline is not shown.
   \end{itemize}
 
-  \themeauthor Manuel Carro. Boadilla is a village in the vicinity of
-  Madrid, hosting the Univeristy's Computer Science department.
+  \themeauthor Manuel Carro. Boadilla is a village in the vicinity of Madrid, hosting the Univeristy's Computer Science department.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{Madrid}
-  Like the |Boadilla| theme, except that stronger colors are used and
-  that the itemize icons are not modified. The same \meta{options} as
-  for the |Boadilla| theme may be given.
+  Like the |Boadilla| theme, except that stronger colors are used and that the itemize icons are not modified. The same \meta{options} as for the |Boadilla| theme may be given.
 
   \themeauthor Manuel Carro. Madrid is the capital of Spain.
 \end{themeexample}
 
+\begin{themeexample}{AnnArbor}
+  Like |Boadille|, but using the colors of the University of Michigan.
 
-\begin{themeexample}{AnnArbor}
-  Like |Boadille|, but using the colors of the University of
-  Michigan.
-
-  \themeauthor Madhusudan Singh. The University of Michigan is located
-  at Ann Arbor.
+  \themeauthor Madhusudan Singh. The University of Michigan is located at Ann Arbor.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}{CambridgeUS}
   \themeauthor Madhusudan Singh.
 \end{themeexample}
 
+\begin{themeexample}{Pittsburgh}
+  A sober theme. The right-flushed frame titles creates an interesting ``tension'' inside each frame.
 
-\begin{themeexample}{Pittsburgh}
-  A sober theme. The right-flushed frame titles creates an interesting
-  ``tension'' inside each frame.
-
-  Pittsburgh is a town in the eastern USA. It hosts the second
-  \textsc{recomb} workshop of \textsc{snp}s and haplotypes, 2004.
+  Pittsburgh is a town in the eastern USA. It hosts the second \textsc{recomb} workshop of \textsc{snp}s and haplotypes, 2004.
 \end{themeexample}
 
-
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{Rochester}
-  A dominant theme without any navigational elements. It can be made less
-  dominant by using a different color theme.
+  A dominant theme without any navigational elements. It can be made less dominant by using a different color theme.
 
   The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item \declare{|height=|\meta{dimension}} sets the height of the
-    frame title bar.
+  \item \declare{|height=|\meta{dimension}} sets the height of the frame title bar.
   \end{itemize}
 
   Rochester is a town in upstate New York, USA. I visited Rochester in 2001.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 
-
-
 \subsection{Presentation Themes with a Tree-Like Navigation Bar}
 
 \begin{themeexample}{Antibes}
-  A dominant theme with a tree-like navigation at the top. The
-  rectangular elements mirror the rectangular navigation at the
-  top. The theme can be made less dominant by using a different color
-  theme.
+  A dominant theme with a tree-like navigation at the top. The rectangular elements mirror the rectangular navigation at the top. The theme can be made less dominant by using a different color theme.
 
   Antibes is a town in the south of France. It hosted \textsc{stacs} 2002.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}{JuanLesPins}
-  A variation on the |Antibes| theme that has a much ``smoother''
-  appearance. It can be made less dominant by choosing a different
-  color theme.
+  A variation on the |Antibes| theme that has a much ``smoother'' appearance. It can be made less dominant by choosing a different color theme.
 
   Juan--Les--Pins is a cozy village near Antibes. It hosted \textsc{stacs} 2002.
 \end{themeexample}
 
-
 \begin{themeexample}{Montpellier}
-  A sober theme giving basic navigational hints. The headline can be
-  made more dominant by using a different color theme.
+  A sober theme giving basic navigational hints. The headline can be made more dominant by using a different color theme.
 
   Montpellier is in the south of France. It hosted \textsc{stacs} 2004.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 
-
 \subsection{Presentation Themes with a Table of Contents Sidebar}
 
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{Berkeley}
-  A dominant theme. If the navigation bar is on the left, it dominates
-  since it is seen first. The height of the frame title is fixed to
-  two and a half lines, thus you should be careful with overly long
-  titles. A logo will be put in the corner area. Rectangular areas
-  dominate the layout. The theme can be made less dominant by using a
-  different color theme.
+  A dominant theme. If the navigation bar is on the left, it dominates since it is seen first. The height of the frame title is fixed to two and a half lines, thus you should be careful with overly long titles. A logo will be put in the corner area. Rectangular areas dominate the layout. The theme can be made less dominant by using a different color theme.
 
-  By default, the current entry of the table of contents in the
-  sidebar will be highlighted by using a more vibrant color. A good
-  alternative is to highlight the current entry by using a different
-  color for the background of the current point. The color theme
-  |sidebartab| installs the appropriate colors, so you just have to
-  say
+  By default, the current entry of the table of contents in the sidebar will be highlighted by using a more vibrant color. A good alternative is to highlight the current entry by using a different color for the background of the current point. The color theme |sidebartab| installs the appropriate colors, so you just have to say
 \begin{verbatim}
 \usecolorhteme{sidebartab}
 \end{verbatim}
-  This color theme works with all themes that show a table of contents
-  in the sidebar.
+  This color theme works with all themes that show a table of contents in the sidebar.
 
-  This theme is useful for long talks like lectures that require a
-  table of contents to be visible all the time.
+  This theme is useful for long talks like lectures that require a table of contents to be visible all the time.
 
   The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item \declare{|hideallsubsections|} causes only sections to be
-    shown in the sidebar. This is useful, if you need to save
-    space.
-  \item \declare{|hideothersubsections|} causes only the subsections
-    of the current section to be shown. This is useful, if you need to
-    save  space.
+  \item \declare{|hideallsubsections|} causes only sections to be shown in the sidebar. This is useful, if you need to save space.
+  \item \declare{|hideothersubsections|} causes only the subsections of the current section to be shown. This is useful, if you need to save space.
   \item \declare{|left|} puts the sidebar on the left (default).
   \item \declare{|right|} puts the sidebar on the right.
-  \item \declare{|width=|\meta{dimension}} sets the width of the
-    sidebar. If set to zero, no sidebar is created.
+  \item \declare{|width=|\meta{dimension}} sets the width of the sidebar. If set to zero, no sidebar is created.
   \end{itemize}
 
-  Berkeley is on the western coast of the USA, near San Francisco. I
-  visited Berkeley for a year in 2004.
+  Berkeley is on the western coast of the USA, near San Francisco. I visited Berkeley for a year in 2004.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{PaloAlto}
-  A variation in the |Berkeley| theme with less dominance of
-  rectangular areas. The same \meta{options} as for the |Berkeley|
-  theme can be given.
+  A variation in the |Berkeley| theme with less dominance of rectangular areas. The same \meta{options} as for the |Berkeley| theme can be given.
 
-  Palo Alto is also near San Francisco. It hosted the Bay Area Theory
-  Workshop 2004.
+  Palo Alto is also near San Francisco. It hosted the Bay Area Theory Workshop 2004.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{Goettingen}
-  A relatively sober theme useful for a longer talk that demands a
-  sidebar with a full table of contents.  The same \meta{options} as
-  for the |Berkeley| theme can be given.
+  A relatively sober theme useful for a longer talk that demands a sidebar with a full table of contents.  The same \meta{options} as for the |Berkeley| theme can be given.
 
   G\"ottingen is a town in Germany. It hosted the 42nd Theorietag.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{Marburg}
-  A very dominant variation of the |Goettingen| theme. The same
-  \meta{options} may be given.
+  A very dominant variation of the |Goettingen| theme. The same \meta{options} may be given.
 
   Marburg is a town in Germany. It hosted the 46th Theorietag.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{Hannover}
-  In this theme, the sidebar on the left is balanced by
-  right-flushed frame titles.
+  In this theme, the sidebar on the left is balanced by right-flushed frame titles.
 
   The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item \declare{|hideallsubsections|} causes only sections to be
-    shown in the sidebar. This is useful, if you need to save
-    space.
-  \item \declare{|hideothersubsections|} causes only the subsections
-    of the current section to be shown. This is useful, if you need to
-    save  space.
-  \item \declare{|width=|\meta{dimension}} sets the width of the
-    sidebar.
+  \item \declare{|hideallsubsections|} causes only sections to be shown in the sidebar. This is useful, if you need to save space.
+  \item \declare{|hideothersubsections|} causes only the subsections of the current section to be shown. This is useful, if you need to save space.
+  \item \declare{|width=|\meta{dimension}} sets the width of the sidebar.
   \end{itemize}
 
   Hannover is a town in Germany. It hosted the 48th Theorietag.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 
-
-
 \subsection{Presentation Themes with a Mini Frame Navigation}
 
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{Berlin}
-  A dominant theme with strong colors and dominating rectangular
-  areas. The head- and footlines give lots of information and leave
-  little space for the actual slide contents. This theme is useful for
-  conferences where the audience is not likely to know the title of
-  the talk or who is presenting it.  The theme can be made less
-  dominant by using a different color theme.
+  A dominant theme with strong colors and dominating rectangular areas. The head- and footlines give lots of information and leave little space for the actual slide contents. This theme is useful for conferences where the audience is not likely to know the title of the talk or who is presenting it. The theme can be made less dominant by using a different color theme.
 
   The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item \declare{|compress|} causes the mini frames in the headline to
-    use only a single line. This is useful for saving space.
+  \item \declare{|compress|} causes the mini frames in the headline to use only a single line. This is useful for saving space.
   \end{itemize}
 
   Berlin is the capital of Germany.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}[\oarg{options}]{Ilmenau}
-  A variation on the |Berlin| theme. The same \meta{options} may be
-  given.
+  A variation on the |Berlin| theme. The same \meta{options} may be given.
 
   Ilemanu is a town in Germany. It hosted the 40th Theorietag.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}{Dresden}
-  A variation on the |Berlin| theme with a strong separation into
-  navigational stuff at the top/bottom and a sober main text. The same
-  \meta{options} may be given.
+  A variation on the |Berlin| theme with a strong separation into navigational stuff at the top/bottom and a sober main text. The same \meta{options} may be given.
 
   Dresden is a town in Germany. It hosted STACS 2001.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 
 \begin{themeexample}{Darmstadt}
-  A theme with a strong separation into a navigational upper part and
-  an informational main part. By using a different color theme, this
-  separation can be lessened.
+  A theme with a strong separation into a navigational upper part and an informational main part. By using a different color theme, this separation can be lessened.
 
   Darmstadt is a town in Germany.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}{Frankfurt}
-  A variation on the |Darmstadt| theme that is slightly less cluttered
-  by leaving out the subsection information.
+  A variation on the |Darmstadt| theme that is slightly less cluttered by leaving out the subsection information.
 
   Frankfurt is a town in Germany.
 \end{themeexample}
 \end{themeexample}
 
 
-
-
 \subsection{Presentation Themes with Section and Subsection Tables}
 
 \begin{themeexample}{Copenhagen}
-  A not-quite-too-dominant theme. This theme gives compressed
-  information about the current section and subsection at the top and
-  about the title and the author at the bottom. No shadows are used,
-  giving the presentation a ``flat'' look. The theme can be made less
-  dominant by using a different color theme.
+  A not-quite-too-dominant theme. This theme gives compressed information about the current section and subsection at the top and about the title and the author at the bottom. No shadows are used, giving the presentation a ``flat'' look. The theme can be made less dominant by using a different color theme.
 
-  Copenhagen is the capital of Denmark. It is connected to Malm\"o by
-  the �resund bridge.
+  Copenhagen is the capital of Denmark. It is connected to Malm\"o by the \O resund bridge.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 
 \begin{themeexample}{Luebeck}
   A variation on the |Copenhagen| theme.
 
-  Lbeck is a town in nothern Germany. It hosted the 41st Theorietag.
+  L\"ubeck is a town in nothern Germany. It hosted the 41st Theorietag.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 \begin{themeexample}{Malmoe}
   A more sober variation of the |Copenhagen| theme.
 
-  Malm is a town in southern Sweden. It hosted \textsc{fct} 2001.
+  Malm\"o is a town in southern Sweden. It hosted \textsc{fct} 2001.
 \end{themeexample}
 
 
 
 \subsection{Presentation Themes Included For Compatibility}
 
-Earlier versions of \beamer\ included some further themes. These
-themes are still available for compatibility, though they are now
-implemented differently (they also mainly install appropriate color,
-font, inner, and outer themes). However, they may or may not honour
-color themes and they will not be supported in the future. The
-following list shows which of the new themes should be used instead of
-the old themes. (When switching, you may want to use the font theme
-|structurebold| with the option |onlysmall|.)
+Earlier versions of \beamer\ included some further themes. These themes are still available for compatibility, though they are now implemented differently (they also mainly install appropriate color, font, inner, and outer themes). However, they may or may not honour color themes and they will not be supported in the future. The following list shows which of the new themes should be used instead of the old themes. (When switching, you may want to use the font theme |structurebold| with the option |onlysmall|.)
 
 \medskip
 \begin{tabular}{lp{13cm}}
   |tree| & Try |Montpellier| and, for the bars version, |Antibes| or
   |JuansLesPins|.
 \end{tabular}
-
-

doc/beamerug-twoscreens.tex

 When the presentation program displays the specially prepared
 superwide \beamer-presentation, exactly the left half of the screen
 will be filled with the main presentation, the right part is filled
-with the auxilliary material---voil. Not all presentation programs
+with the auxilliary material---voil\`a. Not all presentation programs
 support this special feature. For example, the Acrobat Reader 6.0.2 will
 only use one screen in fullscreen mode on MacOS~X. You will have to
 find out for yourself whether your display program and system support