Joseph Wright avatar Joseph Wright committed 38dfbd3

Typos/old information (fixes issue #182)

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doc/beamerug-animations.tex

 \item
   A sound playback \emph{can} persist after the current page is closed (though it need not).
 \item
-  The data of a sound file \emph{can} be completely embedded in a \pdf\ file, obliberating the need to ``carry around'' other files.
+  The data of a sound file \emph{can} be completely embedded in a \pdf\ file, obliterating the need to ``carry around'' other files.
 \item
   The sound objects do \emph{not} work together with |dvips| and |ps2pdf|. They only work with |pdflatex|.
 \item

doc/beamerug-color.tex

 \setbeamercolor{grandfather}{fg=green}
 
 {\usebeamercolor[fg]{my color A} still dark red text}
-{\usebeamercolor[fg]{my color b} now dark green text}
+{\usebeamercolor[fg]{my color B} now dark green text}
 \end{verbatim}
   \end{itemize}
 \end{command}

doc/beamerug-compatibility.tex

 
 \begin{package}{{CJK}}
   \beamernote
-  When using the |CJK| package for using Asian fonts, you must use the class option \declare{|CJK|}. See |beamerexample4.tex| for an example.
+  When using the |CJK| package for using Asian fonts, you must use the class option \declare{|CJK|}.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{deluxetable}}

doc/beamerug-globalstructure.tex

 
 If you give a long talk (like a lecture), you may wish to break up your talk into several parts. Each such part acts like a little ``talk of its own'' with its own table of contents, its own navigation bars, and so on. Inside one part, the sections and subsections of the other parts are not shown at all.
 
-To create a new part, use the |\part| command. All sections and subsections following this command will be ``local'' to that part. Like the |\section| and |\subsection| command, the |\part| command does not cause any frame or special text to be produced. However, it is often advisable for the start of a new part to use the command |\partpage| to insert some text into a frame that ``advertises'' the beginning of a new part. See |beamerexample3.tex| for an example.
+To create a new part, use the |\part| command. All sections and subsections following this command will be ``local'' to that part. Like the |\section| and |\subsection| command, the |\part| command does not cause any frame or special text to be produced. However, it is often advisable for the start of a new part to use the command |\partpage| to insert some text into a frame that ``advertises'' the beginning of a new part.
 
 \begin{command}{\part\sarg{mode specification}\oarg{short part name}\marg{part name}}
   Starts a part. The \meta{part name} will be shown when the |\partpage| command is used. The \meta{short part name} is not shown anywhere by default, but it is accessible via the command |\insertshortpart|.

doc/beamerug-guidelines.tex

 
 Summing up, the font size has little to do with the actual size of letters. Rather, these days it is a convention that 10pt or 11pt is the size a font should be printed for ``normal reading.'' Fonts are designed so that they can optimally be read at these sizes.
 
-In a presentation the classical font sizes obviously lose their meaning. Nobody could read a projected text if it were actually 11pt. Instead, the projected letters need to be several centimeters high. Thus, it does not really make sense to specify ``font sizes'' for presentations in the usual way. Instead, you should try to think of the number of lines that will fit on a slide if you were to fill the whole slide with line-by-line text (you are never going to do that in practice, though). Depending on how far your audience is removed from the projection and on how large the projection is, between 10 and 20 lines should fit on each slide. The less lines, the more readable your text will be.
+In a presentation the classical font sizes obviously lose their meaning. Nobody could read a projected text if it were actually 11pt. Instead, the projected letters need to be several centimetres high. Thus, it does not really make sense to specify ``font sizes'' for presentations in the usual way. Instead, you should try to think of the number of lines that will fit on a slide if you were to fill the whole slide with line-by-line text (you are never going to do that in practice, though). Depending on how far your audience is removed from the projection and on how large the projection is, between 10 and 20 lines should fit on each slide. The less lines, the more readable your text will be.
 
 In \beamer, the default sizes of the fonts are chosen in a way that makes it difficult to fit ``too much'' onto a slide. Also, it will ensure that your slides are readable even under bad conditions like a large room and a small only a small projection area. However, you may wish to enlarge or shrink the fonts a bit if you know this to be more appropriate in your presentation environment.
 
 Once the size of the normal text is settled, all other sizes are usually defined relative to that size. For this reason, \LaTeX\ has commands like |\large| or |\small|. The actual size these commands select depends on the size of normal text.
 
-In a presentation, you will want to use a very small font for text in headlines, footlines, or sidebars since the text shown there is not vital and is read at the audience's leasure. Naturally, the text should still be large enough that it actually \emph{can} be read without binoculars. However, in a normal presentation environment the audience will still be able to read even |\tiny| text when necessary.
+In a presentation, you will want to use a very small font for text in headlines, footlines, or sidebars since the text shown there is not vital and is read at the audience's leisure. Naturally, the text should still be large enough that it actually \emph{can} be read without binoculars. However, in a normal presentation environment the audience will still be able to read even |\tiny| text when necessary.
 
 However, using small fonts can be tricky. Many PostScript fonts are just scaled down when used at small sizes. When a font is used at less than its normal size, the characters should actually be stroked using a slightly thicker ``pen'' than the one resulting from just scaling things. For this reason, high quality multiple master fonts or the Computer Modern fonts use different fonts for small characters and for normal characters. However, when you use a normal Helvetica or Times font, the characters are just scaled down. A similar problem arises when you use a light font on a dark background. Even when printed on paper in high resolution, light-on-dark text tends to be ``overflooded'' by the dark background. When light-on-dark text is rendered in a presentation this effect can be much worse, making the text almost impossible to read.
 

doc/beamerug-nonpresentation.tex

 \subsection{Creating Handouts Using the Handout Mode}
 \label{handout}
 
-The easiest way of creating a handout for your audience (though not the most desirable one) is to use the |handout| option. This option works exactly like the |trans| option. An elaborated example of different overlay specifications for the presentation, the handout, and the transparencies can be found in the file |beamerexample1.tex|.
+The easiest way of creating a handout for your audience (though not the most desirable one) is to use the |handout| option. This option works exactly like the |trans| option. 
 
 \begin{classoption}{handout}
   Create a version that uses the |handout| overlay specifications.
   Tells the \beamer\ class where to find the presentation version of the current file.
 \end{command}
 
-An example of this workflow approach can be found in the |examples| subdirectory for files starting with |beamerexample2|.
-
 \subsubsection{Including Slides from the Presentation Version in the Article Version}
 
 If you use the package |beamerarticle|, the |\frame| command becomes available in |article| mode. By adjusting the frame template, you can ``mimic'' the appearance of frames typeset by \beamer\ in your articles. However, sometimes you may wish to insert ``the real thing'' into the |article| version, that is, a precise ``screenshot'' of a slide from the presentation. The commands introduced in the following help you do exactly this.

doc/beamerug-overlays.tex

   \only<3>{Replaced again by this on third slide.}
 \end{verbatim}
 
-The trouble with this approach is that it may lead to slight, but annoying differences in the heights of the lines, which may cause the whole frame to ``whobble'' from slide to slide. This problem becomes much more severe if the replacement text is several lines long.
+The trouble with this approach is that it may lead to slight, but annoying differences in the heights of the lines, which may cause the whole frame to ``wobble'' from slide to slide. This problem becomes much more severe if the replacement text is several lines long.
 
 To solve this problem, you can use two environments: |overlayarea| and |overprint|. The first is more flexible, but less user-friendly.
 

doc/beamerug-twoscreens.tex

 
 The next step is to choose an appropriate option for showing something special on the second screen. These options are discussed in the following sections.
 
-One of the things these options do is to setup a certain |pgfpages|-layout that is appropriate for two-screen presentations. However, you can still change hte |pgfpages|-layout arbitrarily, afterwards. For example, you might wish to enlarge the virtual pages. For details, see the documentation of |pgfpages|.
+One of the things these options do is to setup a certain |pgfpages|-layout that is appropriate for two-screen presentations. However, you can still change the |pgfpages|-layout arbitrarily, afterwards. For example, you might wish to enlarge the virtual pages. For details, see the documentation of |pgfpages|.
 
 
 \subsection{Showing Notes on the Second Screen}
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