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Anonymous committed 499845e

buttons

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Files changed (8)

 \pgfdefobject{beamerslidenavstrong}{\pgfpoint{0pt}{-1pt}}{\pgfpoint{20pt}{5pt}}
 {\pgfrect[stroke]{\pgfpoint{8.3pt}{0.8pt}}{\pgfpoint{3.4pt}{2.4pt}}}
 
-\def\insertslidenavigationbuttons{%
+\def\insertslidenavigationsymbol{%
   \begin{pgfpicture}{0pt}{-1.5pt}{20pt}{5.5pt}
     \color{\beamernavigationcolorlight}%
     \pgfuseobject{beamerslidenavlight}%
  \pgfqlineto{11.2}{1.6}
  \pgfstroke}
 
-\def\insertframenavigationbuttons{%
+\def\insertframenavigationsymbol{%
   \begin{pgfpicture}{0pt}{-1.5pt}{20pt}{5.5pt}
     \color{\beamernavigationcolorlight}%
     \pgfuseobject{beamerframenavlight}%
   \pgfqlineto{12}{3}
   \pgfstroke}
 
-\def\insertsubsectionnavigationbuttons{%
+\def\insertsubsectionnavigationsymbol{%
   \begin{pgfpicture}{0pt}{-1.5pt}{20pt}{5.5pt}
     \color{\beamernavigationcolorlight}%
     \pgfuseobject{beamersubsectionnavlight}%
   \pgfstroke
 }
 
-\def\insertsectionnavigationbuttons{%
+\def\insertsectionnavigationsymbol{%
   \begin{pgfpicture}{0pt}{-1.5pt}{20pt}{5.5pt}
     \color{\beamernavigationcolorlight}%
     \pgfuseobject{beamersectionnavlight}%
   \hyperlinksectionend{\kern5.5pt}%
   \hyperlinksectionstartnext{\kern5pt}}
 
-\ifx\beamer@appendixpages\@empty
+\ifx\beamer@startpageofappendix\@empty
 % no appendix
 \pgfdefobject{beamerdocnavstrong}{\pgfpoint{0pt}{-1pt}}{\pgfpoint{20pt}{5pt}}
 {\pgfsetlinewidth{0.6pt}
   \pgfqlineto{12}{0}
   \pgfstroke}
 
-\def\insertdocnavigationbuttons{%
+\def\insertdocnavigationsymbol{%
   \begin{pgfpicture}{0pt}{-1.5pt}{20pt}{5.5pt}
     \color{\beamernavigationcolorstrong}%
     \pgfuseobject{beamerdocnavstrong}%
   \pgfstroke
 }
 
-\def\insertdocnavigationbuttons{%
+\def\insertdocnavigationsymbol{%
   \begin{pgfpicture}{0pt}{-1.5pt}{20pt}{5.5pt}
     \color{\beamernavigationcolorlight}%
     \pgfuseobject{beamerdocnavlight}%
   \pgfstroke
 }  
 
-\def\insertbackfindforwardnavigationbuttons{%
+\def\insertbackfindforwardnavigationsymbol{%
   \begin{pgfpicture}{0pt}{-1.5pt}{20pt}{5.5pt}
     \color{\beamernavigationcolorlight!50!\beamernavigationcolorstrong}%
     \pgfuseobject{beamerbackfindforwardnav}%
   \Acrobatmenu{GoForward}{\kern7pt}}
 
 
-\def\usenavigationbuttontemplate#1{%
-  \def\insertnavigationbuttons{#1}}
+\def\usenavigationsymbolstemplate#1{%
+  \def\insertnavigationsymbols{#1}}
 
 
 %
 \def\usebuttontemplate#1{%
   \def\beamer@buttontemplate{#1}}
 
-\def\beamerbutton#1#2{%
-  \def\insertbuttontext{\hyperlink{#1}{#2}}%
+\def\beamerbutton#1{%
+  \def\insertbuttontext{#1}%
   \beamer@buttontemplate}
-\def\beamergotobutton#1#2{%
-  \def\insertbuttontext{\hyperlink{#1}{\insertgotosymbol#2}}%
+\def\beamergotobutton#1{%
+  \def\insertbuttontext{\insertgotosymbol#1}%
   \beamer@buttontemplate}%
-\def\beamerskipbutton#1#2{%
-  \def\insertbuttontext{\hyperlink{#1}{\insertskipsymbol#2}}%
+\def\beamerskipbutton#1{%
+  \def\insertbuttontext{\insertskipsymbol#1}%
   \beamer@buttontemplate}%
-\def\beamerreturnbutton#1#2{%
-  \def\insertbuttontext{\hyperlink{#1}{\insertreturnsymbol#2}}%
+\def\beamerreturnbutton#1{%
+  \def\insertbuttontext{\insertreturnsymbol#1}%
   \beamer@buttontemplate}%
 
 
   \dp\beamer@tempbox=0pt%
   \setbox\beamer@tempbox=\vbox{\box\beamer@tempbox\vskip2pt}%
   \beamer@tempdim=\wd\beamer@tempbox%
+  \newdimen\dima
+  \newdimen\dimb
+  \dima=\beamer@tempdim\advance\dima by2.2pt
+  \dimb=\beamer@tempdim\advance\dimb by4pt
   \begin{pgfpicture}{-4pt}{0pt}{\the\beamer@tempdim}{8pt}
-    \color{structure}
-    \pgfcircle[fill]{\pgfpoint{0pt}{4pt}}{4pt}
-    \pgfcircle[fill]{\pgfpoint{\the\beamer@tempdim}{4pt}}{4pt}
-    \pgfrect[fill]{\pgfpoint{0pt}{0pt}}{\pgfpoint{\the\beamer@tempdim}{8pt}}
+    \color{structure!50!averagebackgroundcolor}
+    \pgfsetlinewidth{0.8pt}
+    \pgfqmoveto{0}{0}
+    \pgfqcurveto{-2.2}{0}{-4}{1.8}{-4}{4}
+    \pgfqcurveto{-4}{6.2}{-2.2}{8}{0}{8}
+    \pgflineto{\pgfpoint{\the\beamer@tempdim}{8pt}}
+    \pgfcurveto%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dima}{8pt}}%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dimb}{6.2pt}}%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dimb}{4pt}}
+    \pgfcurveto%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dimb}{1.8pt}}%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dima}{0pt}}%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\beamer@tempdim}{0pt}}
+    \pgffill
   \end{pgfpicture}%
   \hskip-\beamer@tempdim%
   \box\beamer@tempbox%
   \kern4pt}
-\usenavigationbuttontemplate{}
+
+\usenavigationsymbolstemplate{\hbox{%
+  \hbox{\insertslidenavigationsymbol}
+  \hbox{\insertframenavigationsymbol}
+  \hbox{\insertsubsectionnavigationsymbol}
+  \hbox{\insertsectionnavigationsymbol}
+  \hbox{\insertdocnavigationsymbol}
+  \hbox{\insertbackfindforwardnavigationsymbol}}}

beamertemplates.sty

 % Buttons
 %
 
-\newcommand{\beamertemplatenavigationbuttonsempty}{
-  \usenavigationbuttontemplate{}}
+\newcommand{\beamertemplateoutlinebuttons}
+{\usebuttontemplate{%
+  \color{structure}
+  \setbox\beamer@tempbox=\hbox{\tiny\insertbuttontext}%
+  \ht\beamer@tempbox=6pt%
+  \dp\beamer@tempbox=0pt%
+  \setbox\beamer@tempbox=\vbox{\box\beamer@tempbox\vskip2pt}%
+  \beamer@tempdim=\wd\beamer@tempbox%
+  \newdimen\dima
+  \newdimen\dimb
+  \dima=\beamer@tempdim\advance\dima by2.2pt
+  \dimb=\beamer@tempdim\advance\dimb by4pt
+  \begin{pgfpicture}{-4pt}{0pt}{\the\beamer@tempdim}{8pt}
+    \color{structure!50!averagebackgroundcolor}
+    \pgfsetlinewidth{0.8pt}
+    \pgfqmoveto{0}{0}
+    \pgfqcurveto{-2.2}{0}{-4}{1.8}{-4}{4}
+    \pgfqcurveto{-4}{6.2}{-2.2}{8}{0}{8}
+    \pgflineto{\pgfpoint{\the\beamer@tempdim}{8pt}}
+    \pgfcurveto%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dima}{8pt}}%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dimb}{6.2pt}}%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dimb}{4pt}}
+    \pgfcurveto%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dimb}{1.8pt}}%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dima}{0pt}}%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\beamer@tempdim}{0pt}}
+    \pgfclosepath
+    \pgfstroke
+  \end{pgfpicture}%
+  \hskip-\beamer@tempdim%
+  \box\beamer@tempbox%
+  \kern4pt}}
 
-\newcommand{\beamertemplatenavigationbuttonsframe}{
-  \usenavigationbuttontemplate{\insertframenavigationbuttons}}
+\newcommand{\beamertemplatesolidbuttons}
+{\usebuttontemplate{%
+  \setbox\beamer@tempbox=\hbox{\tiny\color{white}\insertbuttontext}%
+  \ht\beamer@tempbox=6pt%
+  \dp\beamer@tempbox=0pt%
+  \setbox\beamer@tempbox=\vbox{\box\beamer@tempbox\vskip2pt}%
+  \beamer@tempdim=\wd\beamer@tempbox%
+  \newdimen\dima
+  \newdimen\dimb
+  \dima=\beamer@tempdim\advance\dima by2.2pt
+  \dimb=\beamer@tempdim\advance\dimb by4pt
+  \begin{pgfpicture}{-4pt}{0pt}{\the\beamer@tempdim}{8pt}
+    \color{structure!50!averagebackgroundcolor}
+    \pgfsetlinewidth{0.8pt}
+    \pgfqmoveto{0}{0}
+    \pgfqcurveto{-2.2}{0}{-4}{1.8}{-4}{4}
+    \pgfqcurveto{-4}{6.2}{-2.2}{8}{0}{8}
+    \pgflineto{\pgfpoint{\the\beamer@tempdim}{8pt}}
+    \pgfcurveto%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dima}{8pt}}%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dimb}{6.2pt}}%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dimb}{4pt}}
+    \pgfcurveto%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dimb}{1.8pt}}%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\dima}{0pt}}%
+    {\pgfpoint{\the\beamer@tempdim}{0pt}}
+    \pgffill
+  \end{pgfpicture}%
+  \hskip-\beamer@tempdim%
+  \box\beamer@tempbox%
+  \kern4pt}}
+\newcommand{\beamertemplatenavigationsymbolsempty}{
+  \usenavigationsymbolstemplate{}}
 
-\newcommand{\beamertemplatenavigationbuttonsvertical}{%
-  \usenavigationbuttontemplate{
+\newcommand{\beamertemplatenavigationsymbolsframe}{
+  \usenavigationsymbolstemplate{\insertframenavigationsymbols}}
+
+\newcommand{\beamertemplatenavigationsymbolsvertical}{%
+  \usenavigationsymbolstemplate{
   \vbox{%
-  \hbox{\insertslidenavigationbuttons}
-  \hbox{\insertframenavigationbuttons}
-  \hbox{\insertsubsectionnavigationbuttons}
-  \hbox{\insertsectionnavigationbuttons}
-  \hbox{\insertdocnavigationbuttons}
-  \hbox{\insertbackfindforwardnavigationbuttons}}}}
+  \hbox{\insertslidenavigationsymbols}
+  \hbox{\insertframenavigationsymbols}
+  \hbox{\insertsubsectionnavigationsymbols}
+  \hbox{\insertsectionnavigationsymbols}
+  \hbox{\insertdocnavigationsymbols}
+  \hbox{\insertbackfindforwardnavigationsymbols}}}}
 
-\newcommand{\beamertemplatenavigationbuttonshorizontal}{%
-  \usenavigationbuttontemplate{\hbox{%
-  \hbox{\insertslidenavigationbuttons}
-  \hbox{\insertframenavigationbuttons}
-  \hbox{\insertsubsectionnavigationbuttons}
-  \hbox{\insertsectionnavigationbuttons}
-  \hbox{\insertdocnavigationbuttons}
-  \hbox{\insertbackfindforwardnavigationbuttons}}}}
+\newcommand{\beamertemplatenavigationsymbolshorizontal}{%
+  \usenavigationsymbolstemplate{\hbox{%
+  \hbox{\insertslidenavigationsymbol}
+  \hbox{\insertframenavigationsymbol}
+  \hbox{\insertsubsectionnavigationsymbol}
+  \hbox{\insertsectionnavigationsymbol}
+  \hbox{\insertdocnavigationsymbol}
+  \hbox{\insertbackfindforwardnavigationsymbol}}}}

beamerthemebars.sty

 \usefoottemplate{%
   \vbox{%
     \tinycolouredline{structure!75!white}{\color{white}\textbf{\insertshortauthor\hfill\insertshortinstitute}}%
-    \tinycolouredline{structure}{\color{white}\textbf{\insertshorttitle}\hfill\lower1pt\hbox{\insertnavigationbuttons}}%
+    \tinycolouredline{structure}{\color{white}\textbf{\insertshorttitle}\hfill\lower1pt\hbox{\insertnavigationsymbols}}%
     }}
 
 \def\beamernavigationcolorlight{structure!65!white}

beamerthemesplit.sty

 
                                 % Buttons
 \userightsidebartemplate{0cm}{%
-  \vfill\llap{\insertnavigationbuttons}}
+  \vfill\llap{\insertnavigationsymbols}}

doc/beamerexample.pdf

Binary file modified.

doc/beamerexample.tex

 \usepackage[latin1]{inputenc}
 \usepackage{colortbl}
 
+\usepackage{listings}
 
 % Use some nice templates
 
 \beamertemplateshadingbackground{red!10}{structure!10}
 \beamertemplatetransparentcovereddynamic
 \beamertemplateballitem
-\beamertemplatenavigationbuttonshorizontal
+\beamertemplatenavigationsymbolshorizontal
+\beamertemplatesolidbuttons
 
 %
 % The following defintions are peculiar to this particular
 
   \begin{overprint}
   \onslide<1>
-    \hfill\beamerskipbutton{skipproof}{Skip proof}
+    \hfill\hyperlinkframestartnext{\beamerskipbutton{Skip proof}}
   \onslide<2>
     \begin{proof}
       Every context-free language can be accepted by a nondeterministic
 \frame
 {
   \frametitle{Relationships among Overhead-Free Computation Classes}
-
-  \hypertarget<1>{skipproof}{}
   
   \begin{pgfpicture}{-5.4cm}{0cm}{5.4cm}{6.5cm}
     \pgfsetlinewidth{0.8pt}
   \end{Theorem}
   \vskip1em
 
-  \beamergotobutton{proofdetails}{Proof details}
+  \hyperlink{proofdetails}{\beamergotobutton{Proof details}}
   \hypertarget{backfromproofdetails}{}
 }
 
     \end{itemize}
   \end{proof}
 
-  \hfill\beamerreturnbutton{backfromproofdetails}{Return}
+  \hfill\hyperlink{backfromproofdetails}{\beamerreturnbutton{Return}}
 }
 
 \subsection{Improvements for Context-Free Languages}

doc/beameruserguide.pdf

Binary file modified.

doc/beameruserguide.tex

-\documentclass{article}
+\documentclass{ltxdoc}
 
 % Copyright 2003 by Till Tantau <tantau@cs.tu-berlin.de>.
 %
 % of the LaTeX Project Public License Distributed from CTAN
 % archives in directory macros/latex/base/lppl.txt.
 
-\usepackage{pgf}
-\usepackage[left=2.5cm,right=2.5cm,top=2.5cm,bottom=2.5cm,nohead]{geometry}
+\usepackage{pgf,xcolor}
+\usepackage[left=2.25cm,right=2.25cm,top=2.5cm,bottom=2.5cm,nohead]{geometry}
 \usepackage{amsmath,amssymb}
 \usepackage[pdfborder={0 0 0}]{hyperref}
 
 \def\pdf{\textsc{pdf}}
 \def\pgf{\textsc{pgf}}
 \def\pstricks{\textsc{pstricks}}
-\def\bs{$\backslash$}
-
-\def\Theme#1{\par\bigskip\noindent\textbf{Theme \texttt{#1}}\par}
-\def\ClassOption#1{\par\bigskip\noindent\textbf{Class Option \texttt{#1}}\par}
-\def\Environment#1{\par\bigskip\noindent\textbf{Environment \texttt{#1}}\par}
-\def\Command#1{\par\bigskip\noindent\textbf{Command \texttt{#1}}\par}
-\long\def\Parameters#1{\medskip\noindent Parameters:
-  \begin{enumerate}\itemsep=0pt\parskip=0pt
-    #1
-  \end{enumerate}}
-\long\def\Description#1{\unskip\medskip\noindent Description: #1}
-\def\Example{\par\medskip\noindent Example: }
+
+\def\declare#1{{\color{red!75!black}#1}}
+
+\def\command#1{\list{}{\leftmargin=2em\itemindent-\leftmargin\def\makelabel##1{\hss##1}}%
+\item\extractcommand#1@\par\topsep=0pt}
+\def\endcommand{\endlist}
+\def\extractcommand#1#2@{\strut\declare{\texttt{\string#1}}#2}
+
+\def\example{\par\smallskip\noindent\textit{Example: }}
+
+\def\environment#1{\list{}{\leftmargin=2em\itemindent-\leftmargin\def\makelabel##1{\hss##1}}%
+\extractenvironement#1@\par\topsep=0pt}
+\def\endenvironment{\endlist}
+\def\extractenvironement#1#2@{%
+\item{{\ttfamily\char`\\begin\char`\{\declare{#1}\char`\}}#2}%
+  {\itemsep=0pt\parskip=0pt\item{\meta{environment contents}}%
+  \item{\ttfamily\char`\\end\char`\{\declare{#1}\char`\}}}}
+
+\def\classoption#1{\list{}{\leftmargin=2em\itemindent-\leftmargin\def\makelabel##1{\hss##1}}%
+\item{{\ttfamily\char`\\documentclass[\declare{#1}]\char`\{beamer\char`\}}}\par\topsep=0pt}
+\def\endclassoption{\endlist}
+
+
+\def\smalltheme{\vbox\bgroup\theme}
+\def\endsmalltheme{\egroup\endtheme}
+\def\theme#1{\list{}{\leftmargin=2em\itemindent-\leftmargin\def\makelabel##1{\hss##1}}%
+\item\extracttheme#1@\par\topsep=0pt}
+\def\endtheme{\endlist}
+\def\extracttheme#1#2@{%
+\item{{{\ttfamily\char`\\usepackage}#2{\ttfamily\char`\{\declare{#1}\char`\}}}}}
+
+
+\newcommand\opt[1]{{\color{black!50!green}#1}}
+\renewcommand\oarg[1]{\opt{{\ttfamily[}\meta{#1}{\ttfamily]}}}
+\newcommand\sarg[1]{\opt{{\ttfamily\char`\<}\meta{#1}{\ttfamily\char`\>}}}
+\newcommand\ssarg[1]{{\ttfamily\char`\<}\meta{#1}{\ttfamily\char`\>}}
 
 \begin{document}
 
 It is a \LaTeX\ class that allows you to create a beamer
 presentation. It can also be used to create slides. It behaves
 similarly to other packages like \textsc{prosper}, but has the
-advantage that it works together directly with \texttt{pdflatex}, but
-also with \texttt{dvips}.
+advantage that it works together directly with |pdflatex|, but
+also with |dvips|.
 
 To use the \beamer\ class, proceed as follows:
 \begin{enumerate}
 \item
-  Specify \texttt{beamer} as document class instead of
-  \texttt{article}.
+  Specify |beamer| as document class instead of
+  |article|.
 \item
-  Structure your \LaTeX\ text using \texttt{section} and
-  \texttt{subsection} commands.
+  Structure your \LaTeX\ text using |section| and
+  |subsection| commands.
 \item
-  Place the text of the individual slides inside \texttt{frame}
+  Place the text of the individual slides inside |frame|
   commands.
 \item
-  Run \texttt{pdflatex} on the text (or \texttt{latex},
-  \texttt{dvips}, and \texttt{ps2pdf}).
+  Run |pdflatex| on the text (or |latex|,
+  |dvips|, and |ps2pdf|).
 \end{enumerate}
 
 The \beamer\ class has several useful features: You don't need any
-external programs to use it other than \texttt{pdflatex}, but it works
-also with \texttt{dvips}. You can easily and intuitively create
+external programs to use it other than |pdflatex|, but it works
+also with |dvips|. You can easily and intuitively create
 sophisticated overlays. Finally, you can easily change the whole slide
 theme or only parts of it. The following code shows a typical usage of
 the class.
 \end{document}
 \end{verbatim}
 
-Run \texttt{pdflatex} on this code (twice) and then use, for example, the
-Acrobat Reader to present the resulting \texttt{.pdf} file in a
-presentation. You can also, alternatively, use \texttt{dvips}; see
+Run |pdflatex| on this code (twice) and then use, for example, the
+Acrobat Reader to present the resulting |.pdf| file in a
+presentation. You can also, alternatively, use |dvips|; see
 Section~\ref{section-postscript} for details.
 
 As can be seen, the text looks almost like a normal \LaTeX\ text. The
-main difference is the usage of the \verb!\frame! command. This
+main difference is the usage of the |\frame| command. This
 command takes one parameter, which is the text that should be shown on
 the frame. Typically, the contents of a frame is shown on a single
 slide. However, in case you use overlay commands inside a frame, a
 single frame command may produce several slides. An example is the
-last frame in the above example. There, the \verb!\item! commands
-are followed by \emph{overlay specifications} like \verb!<1->!,
+last frame in the above example. There, the |\item| commands
+are followed by \emph{overlay specifications} like |<1->|,
 which means ``from slide 1 on.'' Such a specification causes the item
 to be shown only on the specified slides of the frame (see
 Section~\ref{section-overlay} for details). In the above example, a
 slide, a slide showing only the first of the three items, a slide
 showing the first two of them, and a slide showing all three items.
  
-To structure your text, you can use the commands \verb!\section! and
-\verb!\subsection!. These commands will not only create entries in the
+To structure your text, you can use the commands |\section| and
+|\subsection|. These commands will not only create entries in the
 table of contents, but will also in the navigation bars.
 
 
 
 If you only wish to install the beamer class for a quick appraisal, do
 the following: Obtain the latest source version (ending
-\texttt{.tar.gz}) of the \beamer\ package from 
-\href{http://sourceforge.net/projects/latex-beamer/}{\texttt{http://sourceforge.net/projects/latex-beamer/}}
+|.tar.gz|) of the \beamer\ package from 
+\href{http://sourceforge.net/projects/latex-beamer/}{|http://sourceforge.net/projects/latex-beamer/|}
 (most likely, you have already done this). Next, you also need at
 least version 0.34 of the \textsc{pgf} package, which can be found at
 the same place. Finally, you need at least version 1.03 of the
 (although the version on CTAN might be newer).
 
 In all cases, the packages contain a bunch of files (for the \beamer\
-class, \texttt{beamer.cls} is one of these files and happens to be the
-most important one, for the \textsc{pgf} package \texttt{pgf.sty} is
+class, |beamer.cls| is one of these files and happens to be the
+most important one, for the \textsc{pgf} package |pgf.sty| is
 the most important file). 
 Place all files in three directories. For example,
-\texttt{/home/tantau/beamer/}, \texttt{/home/tantau/pgf/}, and
-\texttt{/home/tantau/xcolor/} would work fine for me. Then setup the
-environment variable called \texttt{TEXINPUTS} to be the following
+|/home/tantau/beamer/|, |/home/tantau/pgf/|, and
+|/home/tantau/xcolor/| would work fine for me. Then setup the
+environment variable called |TEXINPUTS| to be the following
 string (how exactly this is done depends on your operating system and
 shell): 
 
 .:/home/tantau/beamer:/home/tantau/pgf:/home/tantau/xcolor:
 \end{verbatim}
 
-Naturally, if the \texttt{TEXINPUTS} variable is already defined
+Naturally, if the |TEXINPUTS| variable is already defined
 differently, you should \emph{add} the three directories to the list. Do
 not forget to place a colon at the end (corresponding to an empty
 path), which will include all standard directories.
 
 For a more permanent installation, you can place the files of the
 \beamer\ package and of the \textsc{pgf} package (see the previous
-subsection on how to obtain them) in an appropriate \texttt{texmf}
+subsection on how to obtain them) in an appropriate |texmf|
 tree. 
 
 When you ask \TeX\ to use a certain class or package, it usually looks
-for the necessary files in so-called \texttt{texmf} trees. These trees
+for the necessary files in so-called |texmf| trees. These trees
 are simply huge directories that contain these files. By default,
-\TeX\ looks for files in three different \texttt{texmf} trees:
+\TeX\ looks for files in three different |texmf| trees:
 \begin{itemize}
 \item
-  The root \texttt{texmf} tree, which is usually located at
-  \texttt{/usr/share/texmf/}, \verb!c:\texmf\!, or\\
-  \verb!c:\Program Files\TeXLive\texmf\!.
+  The root |texmf| tree, which is usually located at
+  |/usr/share/texmf/|, |c:\texmf\|, or\\
+  |c:\Program Files\TeXLive\texmf\|.
 \item
-  The local  \texttt{texmf} tree, which is usually located at
-  \texttt{/usr/local/share/texmf/}, \verb!c:\localtexmf\!, or\\
-  \verb!c:\Program Files\TeXLive\texmf-local\!.
+  The local  |texmf| tree, which is usually located at
+  |/usr/local/share/texmf/|, |c:\localtexmf\|, or\\
+  |c:\Program Files\TeXLive\texmf-local\|.
 \item
-  Your personal  \texttt{texmf} tree, which is located in your home
+  Your personal  |texmf| tree, which is located in your home
   directory.   
 \end{itemize}
 
 local tree. Installation in the root tree can cause problems, since an
 update of the whole \TeX\ installation will replace this whole tree.
 
-Inside whatever \texttt{texmf} directory you have chosen, create
+Inside whatever |texmf| directory you have chosen, create
 the sub-sub-sub-directories
 \begin{itemize}
 \item
-  \texttt{texmf/tex/latex/beamer} and
+  |texmf/tex/latex/beamer| and
 \item
-  \texttt{texmf/tex/latex/pgf}
+  |texmf/tex/latex/pgf|
 \item
-  \texttt{texmf/tex/latex/xcolor}
+  |texmf/tex/latex/xcolor|
 \end{itemize}
 and place all files in these three directories.
 
 Finally, you need to rebuild \TeX's filename database. This done by
-running the command  \texttt{texhash} or \texttt{mktexlsr} (they are
+running the command  |texhash| or |mktexlsr| (they are
 the same). In MikTeX, there is a menu option to do this.
 
 \vskip1em
 For a more detailed explanation of the standard installation process
 of packages, you might wish to consult
-\href{http://www.ctan.org/installationadvice/}{\texttt{http://www.ctan.org/installationadvice/}}.
+\href{http://www.ctan.org/installationadvice/}{|http://www.ctan.org/installationadvice/|}.
 However, note that the \beamer\ package does not come with a
-\texttt{.ins} file (simply skip that part).
+|.ins| file (simply skip that part).
 
 
 
 \subsection{Testing the Installation}
 
-To test your installation, copy the file \texttt{beamerexample.tex}
+To test your installation, copy the file |beamerexample.tex|
 from the documentation subdirectory to some place where you usually
-create presentations. Then run the command \texttt{pdflatex} twice on
-the file and check whether the resulting \texttt{beamerexample.pdf}
+create presentations. Then run the command |pdflatex| twice on
+the file and check whether the resulting |beamerexample.pdf|
 looks correct. If so, you are all set.
 
 If you have updated from a previous version and you have trouble
 \TeX ing some old file, it sometimes helps to delete all the extra
-files \TeX\ creates automatically (like the \texttt{.aux} and
-\texttt{.head} files).
-
+files \TeX\ creates automatically (like the |.aux| and
+|.head| files).
+
+
+
+\subsection{How to Read this User's Guide}
+
+This user guide is both intended as a tutorial and as a reference
+guide. If you do not have much experience with preparing
+presentations, the next section might be especially helpful. The
+following sections explain the basic usage of the |beamer| class as
+well as advanced features. If you wish to adjust the way your
+presentations look (for example, if you wish to add a default logo of
+your institution to every presentation in the future), please read the
+last section.
+
+In this guide you will find the descriptions of all ``public''
+commands provided by the |beamer| class. In each such
+description, the described command, environment or option is printed 
+in red. Text shown in green is optional and can be left out.
 
 
 \section{Workflow}
 which parameters, and hints are given on how to create a
 presentation. If you have already created numerous presentations, you
 may wish to skip the first of the following steps 
-and only have a look at how to convert the \texttt{.tex} file into a
-\texttt{.pdf} of \texttt{.ps} file.
+and only have a look at how to convert the |.tex| file into a
+|.pdf| of |.ps| file.
 
 
 \subsection{Step Zero: Know the Time Constraints}
 presentation folders to be listed nicely when you have several of them
 residing in one directory. If you use an extra directory for each
 presentation, you can call your main file
-\verb!main.tex!. 
-
-To create an initial \verb!main.tex! file for your talk, copy an
-existing file (like the file \verb!beamerexample.tex! that comes along
+|main.tex|. 
+
+To create an initial |main.tex| file for your talk, copy an
+existing file (like the file |beamerexample.tex| that comes along
 with the contribution) and delete everything that is not going to be
-part of your talk. Adjust the \verb!\author{}! and other fields as 
+part of your talk. Adjust the |\author{}| and other fields as 
 appropriate. 
 
 
 With the time constraints in mind, make a mental inventory of the
 things you can reasonably talk about within the time available. Then
 categorize the inventory into sections and subsections. Put
-\verb!\section{}! and \verb!\subsection{}! commands into the (more or
+|\section{}| and |\subsection{}| commands into the (more or
 less empty) main file. Do not create any frames until you
 have a first working version of a possible table of contents. Do not
 feel afraid to change it later on as you work on the talk.
 
 \subsubsection{Creating PDF}
 
-To create a \texttt{PDF} version of this file, run the program
-\verb!pdflatex! on \verb!main.tex! at least twice. Your need to run it
+To create a |PDF| version of this file, run the program
+|pdflatex| on |main.tex| at least twice. Your need to run it
 twice, so that \TeX\ can create the table of contents. In the
 following example, the greater-than sign is the prompt.
 
 \end{verbatim}
 
 
-You can next use a program like the Acrobat Reader or \texttt{xpdf}
+You can next use a program like the Acrobat Reader or |xpdf|
 to view the resulting presentation.
 
 \begin{verbatim}
 
 To create a PostScript version, you should first ascertain that the
 \textsc{hyperref} package (which is automatically loaded by the
-\beamer\ class) uses the option \texttt{dvips} or some compatible
+\beamer\ class) uses the option |dvips| or some compatible
 option, see the documentation of the \textsc{hyperref} package for
 details. Whether this is the case depends on the contents of your
-local \texttt{hyperref.cfg} file. You can enforce the usage of this
-option by passing \texttt{dvips} or a compatible option to the
-\beamer\ class (write \verb!\documentclass[dvips]{beamer}!), which
+local |hyperref.cfg| file. You can enforce the usage of this
+option by passing |dvips| or a compatible option to the
+\beamer\ class (write |\documentclass[dvips]{beamer}|), which
 will pass this option on to the \textsc{hyperref} package.
 
-You can then run \verb!latex! twice, followed by \verb!dvips!.
+You can then run |latex| twice, followed by |dvips|.
 
 \begin{verbatim}
 > latex main.tex
 > dvips -P pdf main.dvi
 \end{verbatim}
 
-The option (\verb!-P pdf!) tells \verb!dvips! to use
+The option (|-P pdf|) tells |dvips| to use
 Type~1 outline fonts instead of the usual Type~3 bitmap fonts. You may
 wish to omit this option if there is a problem with it. 
 
 \end{verbatim}
 
 In order to create a white margin around the whole page (which is sometimes
-useful for printing), add the option \verb!-m 1cm! to the options of
-\verb!psnup!. 
-
-To put two or four slides on one page, use \verb!-2!, respectively
-\verb!-4! instead of \verb!-1! as the first parameter for
-\verb!psnup!. In this case, you may wish to add the option
-\verb!-b 1cm! to add a bit of space around the individual slides.
+useful for printing), add the option |-m 1cm| to the options of
+|psnup|. 
+
+To put two or four slides on one page, use |-2|, respectively
+|-4| instead of |-1| as the first parameter for
+|psnup|. In this case, you may wish to add the option
+|-b 1cm| to add a bit of space around the individual slides.
 
 You can convert a PostScript file to a pdf file using
 
   possible. Visualizations help an audience enormously.
 \item
   Usually, place graphics to the left of the text. (Use the
-  \texttt{columns} environment.) 
+  |columns| environment.) 
 \item
   Graphics should have the same typographic parameters as the
   text: Use the same fonts (at the same size) in graphics as in the
 \subsection{Step Six: Optionally Create a Handout}
 
 Once your talk is fixed, you can create a handout, if this seems
-appropriate. For this, use the class option \verb!handout! as
+appropriate. For this, use the class option |handout| as
 explained in Section~\ref{handout}. Typically, you might wish
 to put several handout slides on one page. See
 Section~\ref{section-postscript} on how to do this.
 
 A presentation consists of a series of frames. Each frame consists of
 a series of slides. You create a frame using the command
-\verb!\frame!. This command takes one parameter, namely the
+|\frame|. This command takes one parameter, namely the
 contents of the frame. All of this text that is not tagged by overlay
 specifications (see Section~\ref{subsection-overlay}) is shown on all
 slides of the frame.  
 
-\Command{frame}
-\Parameters{
-\item
-  optional parameter in square brackets: a specification of slides to
-  be shown, see subsection \ref{subsection-restriction} for details. 
-\item
-  the frame's contents.
-}
-\Example
-\begin{verbatim}
+\begin{command}{\frame\oarg{overlay specification}\marg{frame text}}
+  The \meta{overlay specification} dictates which slides of a frame are
+  to be shown, see Section~\ref{subsection-restriction} for details. 
+  The \meta{frame text} can be normal \LaTeX\ text, but may not contain
+  |\verb| commands or |verbatim| environments, unless special
+  precautions are taken, see Section~\ref{section-verbatim}.
+  \example
+  \begin{verbatim}
 \frame
 {
   Some text...
 
   Some more...
 }
-\end{verbatim}
-
-\Command{plainframe}
-\Parameters{
-\item
-  optional parameter in square brackets: a specification of slides to
-  be shown, see subsection \ref{subsection-restriction} for details. 
-\item
-  the frame's contents.
-}
-\Description{
+  \end{verbatim}
+\end{command}
+
+\begin{command}{\plainframe\oarg{overlay specification}\marg{frame text}}
   This command creates a frame in which the head lines, foot lines,
   and side bars are suppressed. This is useful for creating single
   frames with different head and foot lines or for creating frames
   showing big pictures that completely fill the frame.
-  }
-\Example A frame with a picture completely filling the frame:  
+
+  \example A frame with a picture completely filling the frame:  
 \begin{verbatim}
 \pgfdeclareimage{bigimage}{}{9.6cm}{bigimagefilename}
 \plainframe{\hfill\pgfuseimage{bigimage}\hfill}
 \end{verbatim}
-
-\Example A title page, in which the head and foot lines are replaced
-by two graphics.
+  
+  \example A title page, in which the head and foot lines are replaced
+  by two graphics.
 \begin{verbatim}
 \usetitlepagetemplate{
   \beamerline{\pgfuseimage{toptitle}}
 \begin{document}
 \plainframe{\titlepage}
 \end{verbatim}
-
+\end{command}
 
 \subsubsection{Components of a Frame}
 
 Section~\ref{section-head-templates} for the head and foot lines and
 Section~\ref{section-sidebar-templates} for the side bars.
 
-The frame title is shown prominently at the top of the frame. To
-specify the title, use the command \verb!\frametitle!. You should end
-the frame title with a period, if the title is a proper
-sentence. Otherwise, there should not be a period.
-
-\Command{frametitle}
-\Parameters{
-\item a title for the frame.
-}
-\Example
+The frame title is shown prominently at the top of the frame and can
+be specified with the following command:
+
+\begin{command}{\frametitle\marg{frame title text}}
+  You should end the \meta{frame title text} with a period, if the title is a
+  proper sentence. Otherwise, there should not be a period.
+\example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \frame{
   \frametitle{A Frame Title is Important.}
   Frame contents.
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-
+\end{command}
 
 
 \subsubsection{Restricting the Slides of a Frame}
 The number of slides in a frame is automatically
 calculated. If the largest number mentioned in any
 overlay specification inside the frame is 4, four slides are
-introduced (despite the fact that a specification like \verb!<4->!
+introduced (despite the fact that a specification like |<4->|
 might suggest that more than four slides would be possible).
 
 You can also specify the number of slides in the frame ``by hand.'' To
-do so, you pass an optional argument to the \verb!\frame! command,
+do so, you pass an optional argument to the |\frame| command,
 given in \emph{square} brackets. This argument is also a 
 slide specification. The frame will contain only the slides
 specified in this argument. Consider the following example.
 slide number~2,'' the third ``This is slide number~4,'' and the fourth
 ``This is slide number~5.''
 
-A useful specification is just \texttt{[0]}, which causes the frame to
-have to no slides at all. For example, \verb!\frame[handout:0]! causes
+A useful specification is just |[0]|, which causes the frame to
+have to no slides at all. For example, |\frame[handout:0]| causes
 the frame to be suppressed in the handout version, but to be shown
 normally in all other versions.
 
 
 \subsubsection{Verbatim Commands and Listings inside Frames}
-
-The \verb!\verb! command, the \texttt{verbatim} environment, the
-\texttt{lstlisting} environment, and related environments that allow
+\label{section-verbatim}
+
+The |\verb| command, the |verbatim| environment, the
+|lstlisting| environment, and related environments that allow
 you to typeset arbitrary text work only in
 frames that contain a single slide or that are suppressed
 altogether. Furthermore, you must explicitly specify that the frame
         return i;
   }
 \end{verbatim}
-\unskip\verb!\end{verbatim}!
+\unskip{\MacroFont|\end{verbatim}|}
 \begin{verbatim}
 }
 \end{verbatim}
 
-Instead of \verb!\frame[all:1]! you could also have specified
-\verb!\frame[1]!, but this works only for the presentation version of
+Instead of |\frame[all:1]| you could also have specified
+|\frame[1]|, but this works only for the presentation version of
 the talk, not for the handout version. To make verbatim accessible
 also in the handout version, you would have to specify
 \verb!\frame[1| handout: 1]! and even more if you also have a
-transparencies version. The specification \verb!\frame[all:1]! states
+transparencies version. The specification |\frame[all:1]| states
 that the frame has just one slide in all versions.
 
 If you need to use verbatim commands in frames that contain several
 starts. This is done using two special commands:
 
 
-\Command{defverb}
-\Parameters{
-\item command name (including a backslash)
-\item a one-line verbatim text, delimited by a special symbol (works
-  like the \texttt{verb} command). Adding a star before the second
-  parameter make spaces visible.
-}
-\Description{
+\begin{command}{\defverb\marg{command name}\opt{|*|}%
+    \meta{delimiter symbol}\meta{verbatim text}\meta{delimiter symbol}}
   Declares a verbatim text for later use. The declaration should be
   done outside the frame. Once declared, the text can be used
-  in overlays like normal text.
-  }
-\Example
+  in overlays like normal text. The one-line \meta{verbatim text} must
+  be delimited by a special \meta{delimiter symbol} (works like the
+  |\verb| command). Adding a star makes spaces visible.
+
+\example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \defverb\mytext!int main (void) { ...!
 \defverb\mytextspaces*!int  main  (void ){  ...!
   \end{itemize}
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-
-
-\Command{defverbatim}
-\Parameters{
-\item command name (including a backslash)
-\item a normal parameter that contains a \texttt{verbatim},
-  \texttt{verbatim*}, \texttt{lstlisting}, or a related environment. 
-}
-\Description{
-  Declares a verbatim environment for later use. The declaration
+\end{command}
+
+
+\begin{command}{\defverbatim\marg{command name}\marg{text}}
+  The \meta{text} may contain a |verbatim|,  |verbatim*|,
+  |lstlisting|, or a related environment. The command \marg{command
+    name} can be used later inside frames. The declaration
   should be done outside the frame. Once declared, the text can be
   used in overlays like normal text.
-  }
-\Example
+  
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \defverbatim\algorithm{
 \begin{verbatim}
   return 0;
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-\unskip\verb!\end{verbatim}!
+\unskip{\MacroFont|\end{verbatim}|}
 \begin{verbatim}
 }
 
 \frame
 {
   Our algorithm:
-
   \alert<1>{\algorithm}
-
   \uncover<2>{Note the return value.}
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-
+\end{command}
 
 
 \subsection{Overlays}
 
 \subsubsection{The Pauses Environment}
 
-The \texttt{pauses} environment offers an easy, but not very flexible
+The |pauses| environment offers an easy, but not very flexible
 way of creating frames that are uncovered piecewise. The environment
 itself does not have an immediate effect. But if you use the command
-\verb!\pause! inside the environment, only the text of the environment
-up to the \verb!\pause! command is shown on the first slide. On the
-second slide, everything is shown up to the second \verb!\pause!, and
-so forth. Note that the \verb!\pause! command can only be used on the 
-same level of nesting as the \texttt{pauses} environment.
+|\pause| inside the environment, only the text of the environment
+up to the |\pause| command is shown on the first slide. On the
+second slide, everything is shown up to the second |\pause|, and
+so forth. Note that the |\pause| command can only be used on the 
+same level of nesting as the |pauses| environment.
 
 A much more fine-grained control over what is shown on each slide can
 be attained using overlay specifications, see the next
-subsections. However, for many simple cases the \verb!\pause!
+subsections. However, for many simple cases the |\pause|
 command is sufficient.
 
-If you use multiple  \texttt{pauses} environments on one frame, the
+If you use multiple  |pauses| environments on one frame, the
 slide counting for the second environment starts where the first one
-left off, see the following example. You can nest \texttt{pauses}
+left off, see the following example. You can nest |pauses|
 environments, but this will not always have the effect you might
 expect. 
 
 }
 \end{verbatim}
 
-As a convenience, a \texttt{pauses} environment is automatically setup
-inside each frame, each \texttt{itemize}, each \texttt{description},
-and each \texttt{enumerate}. Thus, by simply using the \verb!\pause!
+As a convenience, a |pauses| environment is automatically setup
+inside each frame, each |itemize|, each |description|,
+and each |enumerate|. Thus, by simply using the |\pause|
 command on the outermost level of any frame or after items in lists or
 descriptions, you uncover the rest of the frame or list only on the
 next slide.
 
-\Environment{pauses}
-\Parameters{
-\item Put the text before first \texttt{pause} from this slide on,
-then continue increasing the slide number. Optional parameter, given
-in square brackets.
-}
-\Description{
+\begin{environment}{{pauses}\oarg{start slide number}}
   The content of the environment is shown piecewise. Each
-  \texttt{pause} command used inside uncovers a bit more of the
-  environment's text. The optional parameter's main use is to set it
-  to~0. The effect of this is that the first \texttt{pause} has no
-  effect, which can be useful if the \texttt{pauses} environment
-  immediately starts with a \texttt{pause} command. This happens
+  |\pause| command used inside uncovers a bit more of the
+  environment's text. The main use of \meta{start slide
+    number} is to set it to~0. The effect of this is that the first
+  |\pause| has no effect, which can be useful if the |pauses|
+  environment immediately starts with a |\pause| command. This happens 
   sometimes when the environment's content is created automatically.
-}
-\Example
+
+\example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \frame
 {
   \end{pauses}
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-As mentioned above, in the above example the \texttt{pause}
-environment could also have been omitted, as the \verb!\frame! command
+\end{environment}
+As mentioned above, in the above example the |pauses|
+environment could also have been omitted, as the |\frame| command
 inserts it automatically.
 
-
-\Command{pause}
-\Description{
+\begin{command}\pause
   When used inside a \texttt{pauses} environment, this command causes
   the text following it to be shown only from the next slide on.
-}
+
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \frame
 {
   \end{itemize}
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-
+\end{command}
 
 
 \subsubsection{Commands with Overlay Specifications}
 \label{subsection-overlay}
 
 An overlay specification is a comma-separated list of slides and
-ranges. Ranges are specified like this: \verb!2-5!, which
+ranges. Ranges are specified like this: |2-5|, which
 means slide two through to five. The start or the beginning of a range
-can be omitted. For example, \verb!3-! means ``slides three, four,
-five, and so on'' and \verb!-5! means the same as \verb!1-5!. A
-complicated example is \verb!-3,6-8,10,12-15!, which selected the
+can be omitted. For example, |3-| means ``slides three, four,
+five, and so on'' and |-5| means the same as |1-5|. A
+complicated example is |-3,6-8,10,12-15|, which selected the
 slides 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, and 15.
 
 Overlay specifications can be written behind certain commands. If such
 }
 \end{verbatim}
 
-For the command \verb!\textbf!, the overlay specification causes the
+For the command |\textbf|, the overlay specification causes the
 text to be set in boldface only on the specified slides. On all other
 slides, the text is set in a normal font.
 
 
 For the following commands, adding an overlay specification causes the
 command to be simply ignored on slides that are not included in the
-specification: \verb!\textbf!, \verb!\textit!, \verb!\textsl!,
-\verb!\textrm!, \verb!\textsf!, \verb!\color!, \verb!\alert!,
-\verb!\structure!. If a command takes several arguments, like
-\verb!\color!, the specification directly follows the command as in
+specification: |\textbf|, |\textit|, |\textsl|,
+|\textrm|, |\textsf|, |\color|, |\alert|,
+|\structure|. If a command takes several arguments, like
+|\color|, the specification directly follows the command as in
 the following example.
 
 \begin{verbatim}
 For the following commands, the effect of an overlay specification is
 special:
 
-\Command{only}
-\Parameters{
-\item a text
-}
-\Description{
-  If an overlay specification is present, the text is inserted only
-  into the specified slides. For other slides, the text is simply
-  thrown away. In particular, it occupies no space.}
-\Example \verb!\only<3->{Text inserted from slide 3 on.}!
-
-There exists a variant of \verb!\only!, namely \verb!\pgfonly!, that
-should be used inside \pgf\ pictures instead of \verb!\only!. The
-command \verb!\pgfonly! inserts appropriate \verb!\ignorespaces!
+\begin{command}{\only\sarg{overlay specification}\marg{text}}
+  If the \meta{overlay specification} is present, the \meta{text} is
+  inserted only into the specified slides. For other slides, the text
+  is simply thrown away. In particular, it occupies no space.
+  \example |\only<3->{Text inserted from slide 3 on.}|
+\end{command}
+
+There exists a variant of |\only|, namely |\pgfonly|, that
+should be used inside \pgf\ pictures instead of |\only|. The
+command |\pgfonly| inserts appropriate |\ignorespaces|
 commands that are needed by \pgf.
 
-\Command{uncover}
-\Parameters{
-\item a text
-}
-\Description{
-  If an overlay specification is present, the text is shown
-  (``uncovered'') only on the specified slides. On other slides, the
+\begin{command}{\uncover\sarg{overlay specification}\marg{text}}
+  If the \meta{overlay specification} is present, the \meta{text} is
+  shown (``uncovered'') only on the specified slides. On other slides, the
   text still occupies space and it is still typeset, but it is not
   shown or only shown as if transparent. For details on how to specify
   whether the text is invisible or just transparent, see
   Section~\ref{section-transparent}. 
-}
-\Example \verb!\uncover<3->{Text shown from slide 3 on.}!
-
-\Command{invisible}
-\Parameters{
-\item a text
-}
-\Description{
-  The text is occupies space and it is still typeset, but it is not
-  shown. If an overlay specification is given, this command takes
+  \example |\uncover<3->{Text shown from slide 3 on.}|
+\end{command}
+
+\begin{command}{\invisible\sarg{overlay specification}\marg{text}}
+  The \meta{text} occupies space and it is typeset, but it is not
+  shown. If the \meta{overlay specification} is given, this command takes
   effect only on the specified slides. This command is a conter-part to
-  \texttt{uncover}, but not quite: unlike \texttt{uncover}, invisible 
+  |\uncover|, but not quite: unlike |\uncover|, invisible 
   text is never shown in a transparent way, but is guaranteed to
   really be invisible.
-}
-\Example \verb!\invisible<-2>{Text shown from slide 3 on.}!
-
-\Command{alt}
-\Parameters{
-\item a slide specification in pointed brackets.
-\item a main text
-\item an alternative text
-}
-\Description{
-  The main text is shown on the specified slides, otherwise the
-  alternative text. The specification must always be present.}
-\Example \verb!\alt<2>{On Slide 2}{Not on slide 2.}!
-
-\Command{temporal}
-\Parameters{
-\item a slide specification in pointed brackets.
-\item a text to be put on all slides before the specified slides
-\item a text to be put on the specified slides
-\item a text tot be put on all slides after the specified slides
-}
-\Description{
+  \example |\invisible<-2>{Text shown from slide 3 on.}|
+\end{command}
+
+\begin{command}{\alt\ssarg{overlay specification}%
+    \marg{default text}\marg{alternative text}}
+  The default text is shown on the specified slides, otherwise the
+  alternative text. The specification must always be present.
+  \example |\alt<2>{On Slide 2}{Not on slide 2.}|
+\end{command}
+
+
+\begin{command}{\temporal\ssarg{overlay specification}%
+    \marg{before slide text}\marg{default text}\marg{after slide text}}
   This command alternates between three different texts, depending on
   whether the current slide is temporally before the specified
   slides, is one of the specified slides, or comes after them. If the
-  specification is not an interval (that is, if it has a ``hole''),
-  the ``hole'' is considered to be part of the before slides.}
-\Example
+  \meta{overlay specification} is not an interval (that is, if it has
+  a ``hole''), the ``hole'' is considered to be part of the before slides.
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
   \temporal<3-4>{Shown on 1, 2}{Shown on 3, 4}{Shown 5, 6, 7, ...}
   \temporal<3,5>{Shown on 1, 2, 4}{Shown on 3, 5}{Shown 6, 7, 8, ...}
 \end{verbatim}
 
-As a possible application of the \verb!\temporal! command consider the
-following example: 
-
+  As a possible application of the |\temporal| command consider the
+  following example: 
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \def\colorize<#1>{%
   \temporal<#1>{\color{structure!50}}{\color{black}}{\color{black!50}}}
   \end{itemize}
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-
-
-\Command{item}
-\Description{
-  Adding an overlay specification to an item in a list causes this
-  item to be uncovered only on the specified slides. This is useful
-  for creating lists that are uncovered piecewise. Note that you are
-  not required to stick to an order in which items are uncovered.
-  }
-\Example
+\end{command}
+
+
+\begin{command}{\item\sarg{overlay specification}\oarg{item label}}
+  Adding an \meta{overlay specification} to an item in a list causes
+  this item to be uncovered only on the specified slides. This is
+  useful for creating lists that are uncovered piecewise. Note that
+  you are not required to stick to an order in which items are
+  uncovered. If present, the optional \meta{item label} comes after
+  the overlay specification. 
+  
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \frame
 {
 }
 \end{verbatim}
 
-In the following concluding example, a list is uncovered
-item-wise. The last uncovered item is furthermore hilighted. 
-
+  \example In the following example a list is uncovered item-wise. The
+  last uncovered item is furthermore hilighted.  
 \begin{verbatim}
 \frame
 {
   \end{enumerate}
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-
-The related command \verb!\bibitem! is also overlay-specification-aware
-in the same way as \verb!\item!.
-
-\Command{hypertarget}
-\Parameters{
-\item a target name
-\item some text
-}
-\Description{
-  If an overlay specification is present, the text is the specified
-  target for hyperjumps only on the specified slide. On all other
-  slides, the text is shown normally. Note that you \emph{must} add an
-  overlay specification to the \texttt{hypertarget} command whenever
-  you use it on frames that have multiple slides (otherwise
-  \texttt{pdflatex} rightfully complains that you have defined the
-  same target on different slides).}
-\Example
-\begin{verbatim}
-\frame{
-  \begin{itemize}
-  \item<1-> First item.
-  \item<2-> Second item.
-  \item<3-> Third item.
-  \end{itemize}
-
-  \hyperlink{jumptoend}{Jump to last slide of the frame.}
-  \hypertarget<3>{jumptoend}{}
-}
-\end{verbatim}
-
-
-\Command{label}
-\Parameters{
-\item a target
-}
-\Description{
-  If an overlay specification is present, the label is only inserted
-  on the specified slide. Inserting a label on more than one slide
-  will cause a `multiple labels' warning. \emph{However}, if no
+\end{command}
+
+The related command |\bibitem| is also overlay-specification-aware
+in the same way as |\item|.
+
+\begin{command}{\label\sarg{overlay specification}\marg{label name}}
+  If the \meta{overlay specification} is present, the label is only
+  inserted on the specified slide. Inserting a label on more than one
+  slide will cause a `multiple labels' warning. \emph{However}, if no
   overlay specification is present, the specification is automatically
   set to just `1' and the label is thus inserted only on the first
   slide. This is typically the desired behaviour since it does not
   really matter on which slide the label is inserted, \emph{except} if
-  you use an \texttt{only} command. Then you need to specifiy a slide.
-}
-\Example
+  you use an |\only| command. Then you need to specifiy a slide.
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \frame
 {
   \only<3>{Specification is needed now.\label<3>{mylabel}}
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-
+\end{command}
 
 \subsubsection{Environments with Overlay Specifications}
 
 second slide an example is added, and on the third slide the proof is
 also shown.
 
-The two special environments \verb!onlyenv! and \verb!uncoverenv! are
-``environment versions'' of the commands \verb!\only! and \verb!\uncover!.
-
-
-\Environment{onlyenv}
-\Description{
-  If an overlay specification is given, the contents of the
-  environment is inserted into the text only on the specified slides. }
-\Example
+The two special environments |onlyenv| and |uncoverenv| are
+``environment versions'' of the commands |\only| and |\uncover|.
+
+
+\begin{environment}{{onlyenv}\sarg{overlay specification}}
+  If the \meta{overlay specification} is given, the contents of the
+  environment is inserted into the text only on the specified slides. 
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \frame
 {
   \end{onlyenv}
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-
-\Environment{uncoverenv}
-\Description{
-  If an overlay specification is given, the contents of the
+\end{environment}
+
+
+\begin{environment}{{uncoverenv}\sarg{overlay specification}}
+  If the \meta{overlay specification} is given, the contents of the
   environment is shown only on the specified slides. It still occupies
-  space on the other slides.}
-\Example
+  space on the other slides.
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \frame
 {
   only on slide 2.
 }
 \end{verbatim}
+\end{environment}
 
 
 \subsubsection{Dynamically Changing Text}
 You may sometimes wish to have some part of a frame change dynamically
 from slide to slide. On each slide of the frame, something different
 should be shown inside this area. You could achieve the effect of
-dynamically changing text by giving a list of \verb!\only! commands like this:
+dynamically changing text by giving a list of |\only| commands like this:
 \begin{verbatim}
   \only<1>{Initial text.}
   \only<2>{Replaced by this on second slide.}
 much more severe if the replacement text is several lines long.
 
 To solve this problem, you can use two environments:
-\verb!overlayarea! and \verb!overprint!. The first is more flexible,
+|overlayarea| and |overprint|. The first is more flexible,
 but less user-friendly.
 
-\Environment{overlayarea}
-\Parameters{
-\item
-  The width of the area.
-\item
-  The height of the area.
-  }
-\Description{
+\begin{environment}{{overlayarea}\marg{area width}\marg{area height}}
   Everything within the environment will be placed in a rectangular
   area of the specified size. The area will have the same size on all
-  slides of a frame, regardless of its actual contents. }
-\Example
+  slides of a frame, regardless of its actual contents. 
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \begin{overlayarea}{\textwidth}{3cm}
   \only<1>{Some text for the first slide.\\Possibly several lines long.}
   \only<2>{Replacement on the second slide.}
 \end{overlayarea}
 \end{verbatim}
-
-
-\Environment{overprint}
-\Parameters{
-\item
-  Optional parameter in square brackets: width of the overprint
-  area. Default: text width.
-  }
-\Description{
-  Inside the environment, use \texttt{onslide} commands to specify
+\end{environment}
+
+\begin{environment}{{overprint}\oarg{area width}}
+  The \meta{area width} defaults to the text width.
+  Inside the environment, use |\onslide| commands to specify
   different things that should be shown for this environment on
-  different slides. The \texttt{onslide} commands are used like
-  \texttt{item} commands. Everything within the environment will be
+  different slides. The |\onslide| commands are used like
+  |\item| commands. Everything within the environment will be
   placed in a rectangular area of the specified width. The height and
   depth of the area are chosen large enough to accommodate the largest
   contents of the area. The overlay specifications of the
-  \texttt{onslide} commands must be disjoint.}
-\Example
+  |\onslide| commands must be disjoint.
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \begin{overprint}
   \onslide<1>
     Replacement on the second slide.
 \end{overprint}
 \end{verbatim}
-
+\end{environment}
 
 
 
 You can define a new command that is overlay-specification-aware using
 the following command.
 
-\Command{newoverlaycommand}
-\Parameters{
-\item name of the command
-\item commands to be executed on the specified slides
-\item commands to be executed otherwise
-}
-\Description{
-  Declares a new command. If this command is encountered, it is
-  checked whether an overlay specification follows. If not, the
-  commands given in the second parameter are executed. If there is a
-  specification, the second parameter is executed if the current slide
-  is specified, otherwise the third parameter is executed.
-  }
-\Example
+\begin{command}{\newoverlaycommand\marg{command name}%
+    \marg{default text}\marg{alternative text}}
+  Declares the new command named \meta{command name}. If this command is
+  encountered by \TeX, it is checked whether an overlay specification
+  follows. If not, the \meta{default text} is inserted. If there is a
+  specification, the \meta{default text} is also inserted if the current slide
+  is specified, otherwise the  \meta{alternative text} is inserted.
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \newoverlaycommand{\SelectRedAsColor}{\color[rgb]{1,0,0}}{}
-...
+
 \frame
 {
   \SelectRedAsColor<2>
   The second slide of this frame is all in red. 
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-
-
-\Command{renewoverlaycommand}
-\Parameters{
-\item name of a command to be redefined
-\item commands to be executed on the specified slides
-\item commands to be executed otherwise
-}
-\Description{
+\end{command}
+
+\begin{command}{\renewoverlaycommand\marg{existing command name}%
+    \marg{default text}\marg{alternative text}}
   Redeclares a command that already exists in the same way as
-  \texttt{newoverlaycommand}. Inside the parameters, you can 
+  |\newoverlaycommand|. Inside the parameters, you can 
   still access to original definitions using the command
-  \texttt{original}, see the example.
-  }
-\Example
+  |\original|, see the example.
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \renewoverlaycommand{\tiny}{\original{\tiny}}{}
-...
+
 \frame
 {
   \tiny<2>This text is tiny on slide 2.
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-
-
-
-\Command{newoverlayenvironment}
-\Parameters{
-\item name of the environment
-\item begin commands to be executed on the specified slides
-\item end commands to be executed on the specified slides
-\item begin commands to be executed otherwise
-\item end commands to be executed otherwise
-}
-\Description{
+\end{command}
+
+
+\begin{command}{\newoverlayenvironment\marg{environment name}%
+    \oarg{parameter number}%
+    \marg{default begin}\marg{default end}\\
+    \marg{alternative begin}\marg{alternative end}}
   Declares a new environment that is overlay specification aware. If
   this environment encountered, it is 
   checked whether an overlay specification follows. If not or if it is
-  found and the current slide is specified, the second and third
-  parameters form the beginning and end of the environment. Otherwise,
-  the fourth and fifth parameters are used.
-
-  This command can take one optional parameter, given in square
-  brackets after the first parameter. If this parameter is specified,
-  it must currently be~1. In this case, the begin commands must take
-  one parameter. This parameter will \emph{preceed} the overlay
-  specification, see the examples.
-  }
-\Example
+  found and the current slide is specified, the default begin and end
+  are used. Otherwise, the alternative begin and end are used.
+
+  If the \meta{parameter number} is specified, it must currently
+  be~1. In this case, the begin commands must take one parameter. This
+  parameter will \emph{preceed} the overlay specification, see the
+  examples. 
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \newoverlayenvironment{mytheorem}{\alert{Theorem}:}{}{Theorem:}{}
 
   \end{mytheorem}
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-
+\end{command}
 
 The following two commands can be used to ensure that a certain
 counter is automatically reset on subsequent slides of a frame. This
 counters (you should not use footnotes), these commands have already
 been invoked.
 
-\Command{resetcounteronoverlays}
-\Parameters{
-\item name of a \LaTeX\ counter
-}
-\Description{
+\begin{command}{\resetcounteronoverlays\marg{counter name}}
   After you have invoked this command, the value of the specified
   counter will be the same on all slides of every frame. 
-}
-\Example \verb!\resetcounteronoverlays{equation}!
+  \example |\resetcounteronoverlays{equation}|
+\end{command}
  
-\Command{resetcountonoverlays}
-\Parameters{
-\item name of a \TeX\ count register
-}
-\Description{
-  The same as \texttt{resetcounteronoverlays}, except that this
+\begin{command}{\resetcountonoverlays\marg{count register name}}
+  The same as |\resetcounteronoverlays|, except that this
   command should be used with counts that have been created using the
-  \TeX\ primitive \texttt{newcount} instead of \LaTeX 's
-  \texttt{definecounter}. 
-}
-\Example
+  \TeX\ primitive |\newcount| instead of \LaTeX's  |\definecounter|. 
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \newcount\mycount
 \resetcountonoverlays{mycount}
 \end{verbatim}
-
+\end{command}
 
 
 
 
 \section{Structuring a Presentation}
 
-\subsection{Kinds of Global Structures of Presentations}
-
-Still needs to be written.
-
-\subsubsection{Linear Global Structure}
-
-%\subsubsection{Pyramidal Global Structures}
-
-\subsubsection{Nonlinear Global Structure}
-
-
-
-\subsection{Commands and Environments for Creating Global Structure}
-
+\subsection{Global Structure of Presentations}
+
+Ideally, during most presentations you would like to present your
+slides in a perfectly linear fashion, presumably by pressing the
+page-down-key once for each slide. However, there are different
+reasons why you might have to deviate from this linear order:
+\begin{itemize}
+\item
+  Your presentation may contain ``different levels of detail'' that
+  may or may not be skipped or expanded, depending on the audience's
+  reaction.
+\item
+  You are asked questions and wish to show supplementary slides.
+\item
+  You are asked questions about an earlier slide, which forces you to 
+  find and then jump to that slide.
+\end{itemize}
+You cannot really prepare against the last kind of questions. In this
+case, you can use the navigation bars and symbols to find the slide
+you are interested in, see \ref{section-navigation-bars}.
+
+Concerning the first two kinds of deviations, the \beamer\ class
+offers several ways of preparing such ``planned detours'' or ``planned
+short cuts''.
+\begin{itemize}
+\item
+  You can easily add predefined ``skip buttons.'' When such a button
+  is pressed, you jump over a well-defined part of your talk. Skip
+  button have two advantages over just pressing the forward key
+  is rapid succession: first, you immediately end up at the correct
+  position and, second, the button's label can give the audience a
+  visual feedback of what exactly will be skipped. For example, when
+  you press a skip button labeled ``Skip proof'' nobody will start
+  puzzling over what he or she has missed.
+\item
+  You can add an appendix to your talk. The appendix is kept
+  ``perfectly separated'' from the main talk. Only once you ``enter''
+  the appendix part (presumably by hyperjumping into it), does the
+  appendix structure become visible. You can put all frames that you
+  do not intend to show during the normal course of your talk, but
+  which you would like to have handy in case someone asks, into this
+  appendix.
+\item
+  You can add ``goto buttons'' and ``return buttons'' to create
+  detours. Pressing a goto button will jump to a certain part of the
+  presentation where extra details can be shown. In this part, there
+  is a return button present on each slide that will jump back to the
+  place where the goto button was pressed.
+\end{itemize}
+
+
+\subsection{Commands for Creating the Global Structure}
 
 \subsubsection{Adding a Title Page}
 
-You can use the \verb!\titlepage! command to insert a title page into
+You can use the |\titlepage| command to insert a title page into
 a frame. 
 
-The \verb!\titlepage! command will arrange the following elements on
+The |\titlepage| command will arrange the following elements on
 the title page: the document title, the author(s)'s names, their
 affiliation, a title graphic, and a date.
 
-\Command{titlepage}
-\Description{Inserts the text of a title page into the current frame.}
-\Example \verb!\frame{\titlepage}!
-\vskip1em
+\begin{command}{\titlepage}
+  Inserts the text of a title page into the current frame.
+  \example |\frame{\titlepage}|
+\end{command}
 
 Before you invoke the title page command, you must specify all
 elements you wish to be shown. This is done using the following
 commands: 
 
-\Command{title}
-\Parameters{
-\item A shorter version of the title for inclusion in head lines and
-  foot lines. This parameter is optional and given in square brackets.
-\item A title for the document. Line breaks can be inserted using the
+\begin{command}{\title\oarg{short title}\marg{title}}
+  The \meta{short tile} is used in head lines and foot lines. Inside
+  the \meta{title} line breaks can be inserted using the
   double-backslash command.
-}
-\Example
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \title{The Beamer Class}
-
 \title[Short Version]{A Very Long Title\\Over Several Lines}
 \end{verbatim}
-
-\Command{author}
-\Parameters{
-\item A shorter version of the authors for inclusion in head lines and
-  foot lines. This parameter is optional and given in square brackets.
-\item Names of the authors.
-}
-\Description{
+\end{command}
+
+\begin{command}{\author\oarg{short author names}\marg{author names}}
   The names should be separated using the
-  command \texttt{and}. In case authors have different affiliations,
-  they should be suffixed by the command \texttt{inst} with different
-  parameters.}
-\Example\verb!\author[Hemaspaandra et al.]{Lane Hemaspaandra\inst{1} \and Till Tantau\inst{2}}!
-
-\Command{institute}
-\Parameters{
-\item A shorter version of the institute's name for inclusion in head
-  lines and foot lines. This parameter is optional and given in square
-  brackets.
-\item Institute(s) where the authors work.
-}
-\Description{
+  command |\and|. In case authors have different affiliations,
+  they should be suffixed by the command |\inst| with different
+  parameters.
+  \example|\author[Hemaspaandra et al.]{L. Hemaspaandra\inst{1} \and T. Tantau\inst{2}}|
+\end{command}
+
+\begin{command}{\institute\oarg{short institute}\marg{institute}}
   If more than one institute is given, they should be separated using
-  the command \texttt{and} and they should be prefixed by the command
-  \texttt{inst} with different parameters.}
-\Example
+  the command |\and| and they should be prefixed by the command
+  |\inst| with different parameters.
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \institute[Universities of Rochester and Berlin]{
   \inst{1}Department of Computer Science\\
   \inst{2}Fakult\"at f\"ur Elektrotechnik und Informatik\\
   Technical University of Berlin}
 \end{verbatim}
-
-
-\Command{date}
-\Parameters{
-\item A shorter version of the date for inclusion in head
-  lines and foot lines. This parameter is optional and given in square
-  brackets.
-\item A text to be shown as date or occasion at which the talk was held.
-}
-\Example\verb!\date{\today}! or \verb!\date[STACS 2003]{STACS Conference, 2003}!.
-
-
-\Command{titlegraphic}
-\Parameters{
-\item A text to be shown as title graphic. Typically, a picture
-  environment is used as text.
-}
-\Example\verb!\titlegraphic{\pgfuseimage{titlegraphic}}!
-
-
-
-\subsubsection{Adding Table of Contents}
+\end{command}
+
+\begin{command}{\date\oarg{short date}\marg{date}}
+  \example|\date{\today}| or |\date[STACS 2003]{STACS Conference, 2003}|.
+\end{command}
+
+
+\begin{command}{\titlegraphic\marg{text}}
+  The \meta{text} is shown as title graphic. Typically, a picture
+  environment is used as \meta{text}.
+  \example|\titlegraphic{\pgfuseimage{titlegraphic}}|
+\end{command}
+
+
+
+
+\subsubsection{Adding a Table of Contents}
 
 You can create a table of contents using the command
-\verb!\tableofcontents!. Unlike the normal \LaTeX\ table of contents
+|\tableofcontents|. Unlike the normal \LaTeX\ table of contents
 command, this command takes an optional parameter in square brackets
 that can be used to create certain special effects.
 
-\Command{tableofcontents}
-\Parameters{
-\item A list of options, separated by commas. The valid options and
-their effects are explained below.
-}
-\Description{
+\begin{command}{\tableofcontents\oarg{comma-separated option list}}
   Inserts a table of contents into the current frame. To change how
-the table of contents is typeset, you need to modify the appropriate
-templates, see Section~\ref{section-toc-templates}.
-}
-\Example
+  the table of contents is typeset, you need to modify the appropriate
+  templates, see Section~\ref{section-toc-templates}. 
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \section[Outline]{}
 \frame{\tableofcontents}
 \frame{...}
 \end{verbatim}
 
-The options of the command \verb!\tableofcontents! have the following
-effects: 
-\begin{itemize}
-\item
-  The option \texttt{current} causes all but the current section to be
-  shown in a semi-transparent way.
-\item
-  The option \texttt{pausesections} causes a \verb!\pause! command to
-  be issued before each section. This is useful if you wish to show
-  the table of contents in an incremental way.
-\item
-  The option \texttt{pausesubsections} causes a \verb!\pause! command to
-  be issued before each subsection.
-\item
-  The option \texttt{hidesubsections} causes the subsections to be
-  omitted. However, if used together with the \texttt{current} option,
-  the subsections of the current section are not omitted.
-\item
-  The option \texttt{shadesubsections} causes the subsections to
-  be shown in a semi-transparent way.
-\end{itemize}
-
-The last two commands are useful if you do not wish to show too many
-details when presenting the talk outline.
+  The following options can be given:
+  \begin{itemize}
+  \item
+    \declare{|current|} causes all but the current section to be
+    shown in a semi-transparent way.
+  \item
+    \declare{|pausesections|} causes a |\pause| command to
+    be issued before each section. This is useful if you wish to show
+    the table of contents in an incremental way.
+  \item
+    \declare{|pausesubsections|} causes a |\pause| command to
+    be issued before each subsection.
+  \item
+    \declare{|hidesubsections|} causes the subsections to be
+    omitted. However, if used together with the |current| option,
+    the subsections of the current section are not omitted.
+  \item
+    \declare{|shadesubsections|} causes the subsections to
+    be shown in a semi-transparent way.
+  \end{itemize}
+  The last two commands are useful if you do not wish to show too many
+  details when presenting the talk outline.
+\end{command}
 
 
 
 
 \subsubsection{Adding Sections and Subsections}
 
-You can structure your text using the commands \verb!\section! and
-\verb!\subsection!. Unlike standard \LaTeX, these commands will not
+You can structure your text using the commands |\section| and
+|\subsection|. Unlike standard \LaTeX, these commands will not
 create a heading at the position where you use them. Rather, they will
 add an entry to the table of contents and also to the navigation
 bars.
 
 In order to create a line break in the table of contents (usually not
-a good idea), you can use the command \verb!\breakhere!. Note that the
-standard command \verb!\\! does not work.
-
-\Command{section}
-\Parameters{
-\item (optional, in square brackets) text to be shown in horizontal
-  navigation bars 
-\item text to be shown in the table of contents; if empty, no entry is
-  created.
-}
-\Description{
-  Starts a section. No heading is created, the section name is only
-  shown in the table of contents and in the navigation bar. If the
-  main parameter is empty, but the parameter in square brackets is
-  not, a navigation entry is created, but no entry in the table of
+a good idea), you can use the command |\breakhere|. Note that the
+standard command |\\| does not work.
+
+\begin{command}{\section\oarg{short section name}\marg{section name}}
+  Starts a section. No heading is created, but the \meta{section name}
+  is only shown in the table of contents and the \meta{short section name}
+  is only shown in the navigation bar. If the \meta{section name} is
+  empty, a navigation entry is created, but no entry in the table of
   contents. This is useful for sections like a ``table of contents
-  section.''} 
-\Example\verb!\section[Summary]{Summary of Main Results}! or
-\verb!\section[Outline]{}! 
-
-
-\Command{subsection}
-\Parameters{
-\item (optional, in square brackets) text to be shown in horizontal
-  navigation bars 
-\item text to be shown in the table of contents; if empty, no entry is
-  created.
-}
-\Description{
-  Starts a subsection. No heading is created, the subsection name is only
-  shown in the table of contents and in the navigation bar. If the
-  main parameter is empty, but the parameter in square brackets is
-  not, a navigation entry is created, but no entry in the table of
-  contents.}
-\Example\verb!\subsection{Some Subsection}!
-
+  section.''
+  \example|\section[Summary]{Summary of Main Results}| or
+  |\section[Outline]{}| 
+\end{command}
+
+
+\begin{command}{\subsection\oarg{short subsection name}\marg{subsection name}}
+  This command works the same way as the |\section| command.
+  \example|\subsection{Some Subsection}|
+\end{command}
 
 
 
 \subsubsection{Adding a Bibliography}
 
-You can use the bibliography environment and the \verb!\cite! commands
+You can use the bibliography environment and the |\cite| commands
 of \LaTeX\ in a \beamer\ presentation. However, there are a few things
 to keep in mind:
 
   Present references only if they are intended as ``further reading,''
   for example at the end of a lecture.
 \item
-  Using the \verb!\cite! commands can be confusing since the audience
+  Using the |\cite| commands can be confusing since the audience
   has little chance of remembering the citations. If you cite the
   references, always cite them with full author name and year like
   ``[Tantau, 2003]'' instead of something like ``[2,4]'' or
 
 For a beamer presentation, you will typically have to typeset your
 bibliography items partly ``by hand.'' Nevertheless, you \emph{can}
-use \verb!bibtex! to create a ``first approximation'' of the
-bibliography. Copy the content of the file \verb!main.bbl! into your
-presentation. If you are not familiar with \verb!bibtex!, you may wish
+use |bibtex| to create a ``first approximation'' of the
+bibliography. Copy the content of the file |main.bbl| into your
+presentation. If you are not familiar with |bibtex|, you may wish
 to consult its documentation. It is a  powerful tool for
 creating high-quality citations.
 
-Using \verb!bibtex! or your editor, place your bibliographic
-references in the environment \verb!thebibliography!. This
+Using |bibtex| or your editor, place your bibliographic
+references in the environment |thebibliography|. This
 (standard \LaTeX) environment takes one parameter, which should be the
-longest \verb!bibitem! label in the following list of bibliographic
+longest |\bibitem| label in the following list of bibliographic
 entries.
 
-\Environment{thebibliography}
-\Parameters{
-\item Text of the longest label. Inside the environment, use one
-  \texttt{bibitem} command for each reference.
-}
-\Description{
-  Inserts a bibliography into the current frame. Must be placed inside
-a frame. If the bibliography does not fit on one frame, you should
-split it (create a new frame and a second \texttt{thebibliography}
-environment). Even better, you should reconsider whether it is a good
-idea to present so many references.}
-\Example
-
+\begin{environment}{{thebibliography}\marg{longest label text}}
+  Inserts a bibliography into the current frame. The \meta{longest
+    label text} is used to determine the indent of the list. However,
+  several templates for the typesetting of the bibliography (see
+  Section~\ref{section-bib-templates}) ignore this 
+  parameter since they replace the references by a symbol.
+
+  Inside the environment, use a (standard \LaTeX) |\bibitem| command
+  for each reference item. Inside each item, use a (standard \LaTeX)
+  |\newblock| command to separate the authors's names, the title, the
+  book/journal reference, and any notes. Each of these commands may
+  introduce a new line or color or other formatting, as specified by
+  the template for bibliographies.
+
+  The environment must be placed inside a frame. If the bibliography
+  does not fit on one frame, you should 
+  split it (create a new frame and a second |thebibliography|
+  environment). Even better, you should reconsider whether it is a good
+  idea to present so many references.
+  \example