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Vedran Miletić committed 4bbb4d4

More documentation updates: mention luatex and xetex in places where they are relevant. Fix some more incorrect new paragraphs.

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doc/beamerug-compatibility.tex

   If you wish to emulate the |foils| class using \beamer, please see Section~\ref{section-foiltex}.
 \end{class}
 
-\begin{package}{{fontenc}|[|\declare{|T1|}|]|}
-  Use this option only with fonts that have outline fonts available in the T1 encoding like Times or the |lmodern| fonts. In a standard installation the standard Computer Modern fonts (the fonts Donald Knuth originally designed and which are used by default) are \emph{not} available in the T1 encoding. Using this option with them will result in very poor rendering of your presentation when viewed with \pdf\ viewer applications like Acrobat or |xpdf|. To use the Computer Modern fonts with the T1 encoding, use the package |lmodern|. See also Section~\ref{section-font-encoding}.
+\begin{package}{{fontenc}|[|\declare{|T1,EU1,EU2|}|]|}
+  Use the |T1| option \emph{only} with fonts that have outline fonts available in the T1 encoding like |times| or the |lmodern| fonts. In a standard installation standard Computer Modern fonts (the fonts Donald Knuth originally designed and which are used by default) are \emph{not} available in the T1 encoding. Using this option with them will result in very poor rendering of your presentation when viewed with \pdf\ viewer applications like Acrobat, |xpdf|, |evince| or |okular|. To use the Computer Modern fonts with the T1 encoding, use the package |lmodern|. See also Section~\ref{section-font-encoding}. This applies both to |latex|+|dvips| and |pdflatex|
+
+  Use the |EU1| option with |xelatex|, and |EU2| option with |lualatex|. Note that |xelatex| and |luatex| support OpenType fonts, and font encodings work very different compared to |pdflatex|. Again, see Section~\ref{section-font-encoding} for more information.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{fourier}}
 
 \begin{package}{{inputenc}|[|\declare{|utf8,utf8x|}|]|}
   \beamernote
-  When using Unicode, you may wish to use one of the following class options:
+  When using Unicode, you may wish to use \emph{some} of the following class options:
   \begin{classoption}{ucs}
     Loads the package |ucs| and passes the correct Unicode options to |hyperref|. Also, it preloads the Unicode code pages zero and one.
   \end{classoption}
     This option sets the input encoding to |utf8|. It's designed to be used \emph{without} |ucs|. It's the same as saying |\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}| in the preamble.
   \end{classoption}
 
+  Note that \emph{none} of these options apply to |lualatex| and |xelatex|, since both support Unicode natively without any extra packages. Most of the time using these options actually harms output quality, so be careful about what you use. If you want to have a document that allows compiling with multiple drivers, take a look at |iftex|, |ifxetex| and |ifluatex| packages.
+
   \articlenote
   Passing option |utf8| to |beamerarticle| has the same effect as saying |\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}| in the preamble.
+
+  Again, take care if you use |lualatex| or |xelatex|.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{listings}}
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{musixtex}}
-  When using MusiX\TeX\ to typeset musical scores, your document must be compiled with |pdfelatex| or |elatex| instead of |pdflatex| or |latex|.
+  When using MusiX\TeX\ to typeset musical scores, you have to have $\varepsilon$-\TeX extensions enabled. Most modern distributions enable that by default both in |pdflatex| and |latex|. However, if you have an older distribution, the document must be compiled with |pdfelatex| or |elatex| instead of |pdflatex| or |latex|.
 
   Inside a |music| environment, the |\pause| is redefined to match MusiX\TeX's definition (a rest during one quarter of a whole). You can use the |\beamerpause| command to create overlays in this environment.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{pdfpages}}
   Commands like |\includepdf| only work \emph{outside} frames as they produce pages ``by themselves.'' You may also wish to say
-
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamercolor{background canvas}{bg=}
 \end{verbatim}
-
   when you use such a command since the background (even a white background) will otherwise be printed over the image you try to include.
 
   \example

doc/beamerug-emulation.tex

 \item
   If you used fine-grained spacing commands, like adding a little horizontal skip   here and a big negative vertical skip there, the typesetting of the text may be poor. It may be a good idea to just remove these spacing commands.
 \item
-  If you use |pstricks| commands, you will either have to stick to using |latex| and |dvips| or will have to work around them using, for example, |pgf|. Porting lots of |pstricks| code is bound to be difficult, if you wish to switch over to |pdflatex|, so be warned.
+  If you use |pstricks| commands, you will either have to stick to using |latex| and |dvips| or will have to work around them using, for example, |pgf|. Porting lots of |pstricks| code is bound to be difficult, if you wish to switch over to |pdflatex|, so be warned. You can read more about that in Section~\ref{section-graphics} that talks about graphics.
 \item
   If the file cannot be compiled because some \prosper\ command is not implemented, you will have to delete this command and try to mimick its behaviour using some \beamer\ command.
 \end{itemize}
 \end{notes}
 \end{document}
 \end{verbatim}
-
   You can run, for example, pdf\LaTeX\ on the file to get a \beamer\ presentation with overlays. Adding the |notes| option will also show the note. Certain commands, like |\LeftFoot|, are ignored. You can change the theme using the usual commands. You can also use all normal \beamer\ commands and concepts, like overlay-specifications, in the file. You can also create an |article| version by using the class |article| and including the package |beamerarticle|.
 \end{package}
 
 \end{frame}
 \end{document}
 \end{verbatim}
-
   You can use all normal \beamer\ commands and concepts, like overlay-specifications, in the file. You can also create an |article| version by using the class |article| and including the package |beamerarticle|.
 \end{package}
 

doc/beamerug-fonts.tex

 % $Header$
 
 \section{Fonts}
-
 \label{section-fonts}
 
 The first subsection introduces the predefined font themes that come with \beamer\ and which make it easy to change the fonts used in a presentation. The next subsection describes further special commands for changing some basic attributes of the fonts used in a presentation. The last subsection explains how you can get a much more fine-grained control over the fonts used for every individual element of a presentation.
 \label{section-substition}
 
 By default, \beamer\ uses the Computer Modern fonts. To change this, you can use one of the prepared packages of \LaTeX's font mechanism. For example, to change to Times/Helvetica, simply add
-
 \begin{verbatim}
 \usepackage{mathptmx}
 \usepackage{helvet}
 \end{verbatim}
-
 in your preamble. Note that if you do not use the |serif| font theme, Helvetica (not Times) will be selected as the text font.
 
-There may be many other fonts available on your installation. Typically, at least some of the following packages should be available: |avant|, |bookman|, |chancery|, |charter|, |euler|, |helvet|, |lmodern|, |mathtime|, |mathptm|, |mathptmx|, |newcent|, |palatino|, |pifont|, |utopia|.
+There may be many other fonts available on your installation. Typically, at least some of the following packages should be available: |arev|, |avant|, |bookman|, |chancery|, |charter|, |euler|, |helvet|, |lmodern|, |mathtime|, |mathptm|, |mathptmx|, |newcent|, |palatino|, |pifont|, |utopia|.
 
 \subsubsection{Choosing a Font Encodings}
 \label{section-font-encoding}
 Among the packages that make available the Computer Modern fonts in the T1~encoding, the package |lmodern| may be suggested. If you use |lmodern|, several extra fonts become available (like a sans-serif boldface math) and extra symbols (like proper guillemots).
 
 To select the T1 encoding, use \verb|\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}|. Thus, if you have the LM~fonts installed, you could write
+\begin{verbatim}
+\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
+\usepackage{lmodern}
+\end{verbatim}
+to get beautiful outline fonts and correct hyphenation. Note, however, that certain older versions of the LM~bundle did not include correct glyphs for ligatures like ``fi,'' which may cause trouble. Double check that all ligatures are displayed correctly and, if not, update your installation.
 
-\begin{verbatim}
-\usepackage{lmodern}
-\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
-\end{verbatim}
-
-to get beautiful outline fonts and correct hyphenation. Note, however, that certain older versions of the LM~bundle did not include correct glyphs for ligatures like ``fi,'' which may cause trouble. Double check that all ligatures are displayed correctly and, if not, update.
+Everything mentioned above applies to |pdflatex| and |latex|+|dvips|. Unlike those engines, |xelatex| and |lualatex| support OpenType fonts, and that means that you can use system fonts in your documents relatively easy. Details will eventually be documented in this manual, but, for now, you can take a look at the documentation for |fontspec| package which supports both engines. Also, note that when you use |lualatex| or |xelatex| with EU2 or EU1 encoding, respectively, by default you get OpenType Latin Modern fonts.
 
 
 \subsection{Changing the Fonts Used for Different Elements of a Presentation}

doc/beamerug-graphics.tex

   \includegraphics<3>[height=2cm]{step3.pdf}%
 \end{frame}
 \end{verbatim}
-
 A different way of creating graphics is to insert graphic drawing commands directly into your \LaTeX\ file. There are numerous packages that help you do this. They have various degrees of sophistication. Inlining graphics suffers from none of the disadvantages mentioned above for including external graphic files, but the main disadvantage is that it is often hard to use these packages. In some sense, you ``program'' your graphics, which requires a bit of practice.
 
 When choosing a graphic package, there are a few things to keep in
 \item
   Many packages produce poor quality graphics. This is especially true of the standard |picture| environment of \LaTeX.
 \item
-  Powerful packages that produce high-quality graphics often do not work together with |pdflatex|.
+  Powerful packages that produce high-quality graphics often do not work together with |pdflatex|, |lualatex| or |xelatex|.
 \item
-  The most powerful and easiest-to-use package around, namely |pstricks|, does not work together with |pdflatex| and this is a fundamental problem. Due to the fundamental differences between \pdf\ and PostScript, it is not possible to write a ``|pdflatex| back-end for |pstricks|.'' Regardless, \textsc{pst-pdf} and \textsc{pdftricks} package can help here and simplify things from user's perspective.
+  The most powerful and easiest-to-use package around, namely |pstricks|, does not work together with |pdflatex|, |lualatex| or |xelatex| and this is a fundamental problem. Due to the fundamental differences between \pdf\ and PostScript, it is not possible to write a ``|pdflatex| back-end for |pstricks|.'' (Situation with |lualatex| and |xelatex| is very similar.) Regardless, \textsc{pst-pdf}, \textsc{xetex-pstricks} and \textsc{pdftricks} package can help here and simplify things from user's perspective.
 \end{itemize}
 
-A solution to the above problem (though not necessarily the best) is to use the \textsc{pgf} package. It produces high-quality graphics and works together with |pdflatex|, but also with normal |latex|. It is not as powerful as |pstricks| (as pointed out above, this is because of rather fundamental reasons) and not as easy to use, but it should be sufficient in most cases.
+There are three possible solutions to the above problem, each with it's own advantages and disadvantages.
+\begin{itemize}
+\item
+  Use the \textsc{pgf} package. It produces high-quality graphics and works together with |pdflatex|, |lualatex|, |xelatex| and also with normal |latex|. It is not as powerful as |pstricks| (as pointed out above, this is because of rather fundamental reasons) and not as easy to use, but it should be sufficient in most cases.
+\item
+  Use \textsc{luamplib} package and |lualatex|. It provides you with an environment using which you can type MetaPost code directly in your document.
+\item 
+  Use |pstricks| and stick to |latex| and |dvips| or use some of the workarounds mentioned above.
+\end{itemize}
 
 \lyxnote
 Inlined graphics must currently be inserted in a large \TeX-mode box. This is not very convenient.
 
 External graphic files ending with the extension |.eps| (Encapsulated PostScript) or |.ps| (PostScript) can be included if you use |latex| and |dvips|, but \emph{not} when using |pdflatex|. This is true both for the normal |graphics| package and for |pgf|. When using |pgf|, do \emph{not} add the extension |.eps|. When using |graphics|, do add the extension.
 
-If you have a |.eps| graphic and wish to use |pdflatex|, you can use the program |ps2pdf| to convert the graphic to a |.pdf| file. Note, however, that it is often a better idea to directly generate a |.pdf| if the program that produced the |.eps| supports this.
+If you have a |.eps| graphic and wish to use |pdflatex|, you can use the program |ps2pdf| to convert the graphic to a |.pdf| file. Some modern distributions enable |write18| which allows |pdflatex| to do that automatically. Note, however, that it is often a better idea to directly generate a |.pdf| if the program that produced the |.eps| supports this.
 
 
 \subsection{Including Graphic Files Ending \texttt{.pdf}, \texttt{.jpg}, \texttt{.jpeg} or \texttt{.png}}
 \begin{verbatim}
 \DeclareGraphicsRule{*}{mps}{*}{}
 \end{verbatim}
-
 This special feature currently only works with the |graphics| package, not with |pgf|.
 
 

doc/beamerug-introduction.tex

 The list of features supported by \beamer\ is quite long (unfortunately, so is presumably the list of bugs supported by \beamer). The most important features, in our opinion, are:
 \begin{itemize}
 \item
-  You can use \beamer\ with |pdflatex|, |xelatex|, |lualatex| and |latex|+|dvips|.
+  You can use \beamer\ with |pdflatex|, |latex|+|dvips|, |lualatex| and |xelatex|. |latex|+|dvipdfm| isn't supported (but we accept patches!).
 \item
   The standard commands of \LaTeX\ still work. A |\tableofcontents| will still create a table of contents, |\section| is still used to create structure, and |itemize| still creates a list.
 \item

doc/beamerug-tutorial.tex

 
 \subsection{Creating the Presentation PDF File}
 
-Eager to find out how the first page will look, he invokes |pdflatex| on his file |main.tex| (twice). He could also use |latex| (twice), followed by |dvips|, and then possibly |ps2pdf|. Then he uses the Acrobat Reader, |xpdf|, |evince| or |okular| to view the resulting |main.pdf|. Indeed, the first page contains all the information Euclid has provided until now. It even looks quite impressive with the colorful title and the rounded corners and the shadows, but he is doubtful whether he should leave it like that. He decides to address this problem later.
+Eager to find out how the first page will look, he invokes |pdflatex| on his file |main.tex| (twice). He could also use |latex| (twice), followed by |dvips|, and then possibly |ps2pdf|, or |lualatex| (twice), or |xelatex| (twice). Then he uses the Acrobat Reader, |xpdf|, |evince| or |okular| to view the resulting |main.pdf|. Indeed, the first page contains all the information Euclid has provided until now. It even looks quite impressive with the colorful title and the rounded corners and the shadows, but he is doubtful whether he should leave it like that. He decides to address this problem later.
 
 Euclid is delighted to find out that clicking on a section or subsection in the navigation bar at the top hyperjumps there. Also, the small symbols at the bottom seem to be clickable. Toying around with them for a while, he finds that clicking on the arrows left or right of a symbols hyperjumps him backward or forward one slide~/ frame~/ subsection~/ section. Clicking on the left or right side of the symbol hyperjumps to the beginning or end of the frame~/ subsection~/ section. He finds the symbols quite small, but decides not to write an email to \beamer's author since he also thinks that bigger symbols would be distracting.
 

doc/beamerug-workflow.tex

 
 \end{document}
 \end{verbatim}
-
 The empty frame at the end (which should be deleted later) ensures that the sections and subsections are actually part of the table of contents. This frame is necessary since a |\section| or |\subsection| command following the last page of a document has no effect.
 
 
 > pdflatex main.tex
     ... lots of output ...
 \end{verbatim}
+Alternatively, you can use |lualatex| or |xelatex| instead of |pdflatex| in above commands.
 
-You can next use a program like the Acrobat Reader or |xpdf| to view the resulting presentation.
+You can next use a program like the Acrobat Reader, |xpdf|, |evince| or |okular| to view the resulting presentation.
 \begin{verbatim}
 > acroread main.pdf
 \end{verbatim}
 
 The easiest way to print a presentation is to user the Acrobat Reader with the option ``expand small pages to paper size'' form the printer dialog enabled. This is necessary, because slides are by default only 128mm by 96mm large.
 
-For the PostScript version and for printing multiple slides on a single page this simple approach does not work. In such cases you can use the |pgfpages| package, which works directly both with |pdflatex| and |latex| plus |dvips|. Note however \emph{that this package destroys hyperlinks}. This is due to fundamental flaws in the \pdf-specification and not likely to change.
+For the PostScript version and for printing multiple slides on a single page this simple approach does not work. In such cases you can use the |pgfpages| package, which works directly with |pdflatex|, |lualatex|, |xelatex| and |latex| plus |dvips|. Note however \emph{that this package destroys hyperlinks}. This is due to fundamental flaws in the \pdf-specification and it is not likely to change.
 
 The |pgfpages| can do all sorts of tricks with pages. The most important one for printing \beamer\ slides is the following command:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \usepackage{pgfpages}
 \pgfpagesuselayout{resize}[a4paper,border shrink=5mm,landscape]
 \end{verbatim}
-
 This says ``Resize all pages to landscape A4 pages, no what their original size was, but shrink the pages by 5mm, so that there is a bit of a border around everything.'' Naturally, instead of |a4paper| you can also use |letterpaper| or any of the other standard paper sizes. For further options and details see the documentation of |pgfpages|.
 
 The second thing you might wish to do is to put several slides on a single page. This can be done as follows:
 \usepackage{pgfpages}
 \pgfpagesuselayout{2 on 1}[a4paper,border shrink=5mm]
 \end{verbatim}
-
 This says ``Put two pages on one page and then resize everything so that it fits on A4 paper.'' Note that this time we do not need landscape as the resulting page is, after all, not in landscape mode.
 
 Instead of |2 on 1| you can also use |4 on 1|, but then with |landscape| once more, and also |8 on 1| and even |16 on 1| to get a grand (though unreadable) overview.
 \begin{verbatim}
 \mode<handout>{\setbeamercolor{background canvas}{bg=black!5}}
 \end{verbatim}
-
 This will cause the slides of the handout version to have a very light gray background. This makes it easy to discern the slides' border if several slides are put on one page.
 
 %% If you wish each slide to completely fill a letter-sized page, use the
 2. The documentation of the package is also dual-license. Again, you can choose
    between two options:
 
-   a) You can use the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later
+   a) You can use the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.3 or any later
       version published by the Free Software Foundation.
    b) You can use the LaTeX Project Public License, version 1.3c or (at your
       option) any later version).