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Vedran Miletić committed 4ee5c6a

Documentation fixes, part 2.
-- add notes about |poppler| and evince/okular.
-- fix linebreaks.
-- add FIXME note to a place where explanation for option for slide layout should be.

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doc/beamerug-animations.tex

 \subsection{Animations}
 
 \subsubsection{Including External Animation Files}
-
 \label{section-multimedia}
 
 If you have created an animation using some external program (like a renderer), you can use the capabilities of the presentation program (like the Acrobat Reader) to show the animation. Unfortunately, currently there is no portable way of doing this and even the Acrobat Reader does not support this feature on all platforms.
 
 For including an animation in a \pdf\ file, you can use the command |\movie|, which is explained below. Depending on the used options, this command will either setup the \pdf\ file such that the viewer application (like the Acrobat Reader) itself will try to play the movie or that an external program will be called. The latter approach, though much less flexible, must be taken if the viewer application is unable to display the movie itself.
 
-\begin{command}{\movie\oarg{options}\marg{poster text}\marg{movie
-  filename}}
-  This command will insert the movie with the filename \meta{movie
-  filename} into the \pdf\ file. The movie file must reside at some
-  place where the viewer application will be able to find it,
-  which is typically only the directory in which the final \pdf\ file
-  resides. The movie file will \emph{not} be embedded into the \pdf\
-  file in the sense that the actual movie data is part of the
-  |main.pdf| file. The movie file must hence be copied and passed
-  along with the \pdf\ file. (Nevertheless, one often says that the
-  movie is ``embedded'' in the document, but that just means that one can
-  click on the movie when viewing the document and the movie will
-  start to play.)
+\begin{command}{\movie\oarg{options}\marg{poster text}\marg{movie filename}}
+  This command will insert the movie with the filename \meta{movie filename} into the \pdf\ file. The movie file must reside at some place where the viewer application will be able to find it, which is typically only the directory in which the final \pdf\ file resides. The movie file will \emph{not} be embedded into the \pdf\ file in the sense that the actual movie data is part of the |main.pdf| file. The movie file must hence be copied and passed along with the \pdf\ file. (Nevertheless, one often says that the movie is ``embedded'' in the document, but that just means that one can click on the movie when viewing the document and the movie will start to play.)
 
-  The movie will use a rectangular area whose size is determined
-  either by the |width=| and |height=| options or by the size of the
-  \meta{poster text}. The \meta{poster text} can be any \TeX\ text;
-  for example, it might be a |\pgfuseimage| command or an
-  |\includegraphics| command or a |pgfpicture| environment or just
-  plain text. The \meta{poster text} is typeset in a box, the box is
-  inserted into the normal text, and the movie rectangle is put
-  exactly over this box. Thus, if the \meta{poster text} is an image
-  from the movie, this image will be shown until the movie is started,
-  when it will be exactly replaced by the movie itself. However, there
-  is also a different, sometimes better, way of creating a poster image,
-  namely by using the |poster| option as explained later on.
+  The movie will use a rectangular area whose size is determined either by the |width=| and |height=| options or by the size of the \meta{poster text}. The \meta{poster text} can be any \TeX\ text; for example, it might be a |\pgfuseimage| command or an |\includegraphics| command or a |pgfpicture| environment or just plain text. The \meta{poster text} is typeset in a box, the box is inserted into the normal text, and the movie rectangle is put exactly over this box. Thus, if the \meta{poster text} is an image from the movie, this image will be shown until the movie is started, when it will be exactly replaced by the movie itself. However, there is also a different, sometimes better, way of creating a poster image, namely by using the |poster| option as explained later on.
 
-  The aspect ratio of the movie will \emph{not} be corrected
-  automatically if the dimension of the \meta{poster text} box does
-  not have the same aspect ratio. Most movies have an aspect ratio of
-  4:3 or 16:9.
+  The aspect ratio of the movie will \emph{not} be corrected automatically if the dimension of the \meta{poster text} box does not have the same aspect ratio. Most movies have an aspect ratio of 4:3 or 16:9.
 
-  Despite the name, a movie may consist only of sound with no
-  images. In this case, the \meta{poster text} might be a symbol
-  representing the sound. There is also a different, dedicated
-  command for including sounds in a \pdf\ file, see the |\sound|
-  command in Section~\ref{section-sound}.
+  Despite the name, a movie may consist only of sound with no images. In this case, the \meta{poster text} might be a symbol representing the sound. There is also a different, dedicated command for including sounds in a \pdf\ file, see the |\sound| command in Section~\ref{section-sound}.
 
-  Unless further options are given, the movie will start only when the
-  user clicks on it. Whether the viewer application can actually
-  display the movie depends on the application and the version. For
-  example, the Acrobat Reader up to version~5 does not seem to be able
-  to display any movies or sounds on Linux. On the other hand, the
-  Acrobat Reader Version~6 on MacOS is able to display anything that
-  QuickTime can display, which is just about everything. Embedding
-  movies in a \pdf\ document is provided for by the \pdf\ standard and
-  is not a peculiarity of the Acrobat Reader. In particular, one might
-  expect other viewers like |xpdf| to support embedded movies in the
-  future.
+  Unless further options are given, the movie will start only when the user clicks on it. Whether the viewer application can actually display the movie depends on the application and the version. For example, the Acrobat Reader up to version~5 does not seem to be able to display any movies or sounds on Linux. On the other hand, the Acrobat Reader Version~6 on MacOS is able to display anything that QuickTime can display, which is just about everything. Embedding movies in a \pdf\ document is provided for by the \pdf\ standard and is not a peculiarity of the Acrobat Reader. In particular, one might expect other viewers like |xpdf| and |poppler|-based viewers (Okular, Evince) to support embedded movies in the future.
 
   \example
   |\movie{\pgfuseimage{myposterimage}}{mymovie.avi}|
   \example
   |\movie[width=3cm,height=2cm,poster]{}{mymovie.mpg}|
 
-  If your viewer application is not able to render your movie, but
-  some external application is, you must use the |externalviewer|
-  option. This will ask the viewer application to launch an
-  application for showing the movie instead of displaying it
-  itself. Since this application is started in a new window, this is not
-  nearly as nice as having the movie displayed directly by the
-  viewer (unless you use evil trickery to suppress the frame of the
-  viewer application). Which application is chosen is left to the
-  discretion of the viewer application, which tries to make its
-  choice according to the extension of the \meta{movie filename} and
-  according to some mapping table for mapping extensions
-  to viewer applications. How this mapping table can be modified
-  depends on the viewer application, please see the release notes of
-  your viewer.
+  If your viewer application is not able to render your movie, but some external application is, you must use the |externalviewer| option. This will ask the viewer application to launch an application for showing the movie instead of displaying it itself. Since this application is started in a new window, this is not nearly as nice as having the movie displayed directly by the viewer (unless you use evil trickery to suppress the frame of the viewer application). Which application is chosen is left to the discretion of the viewer application, which tries to make its choice according to the extension of the \meta{movie filename} and according to some mapping table for mapping extensions to viewer applications. How this mapping table can be modified depends on the viewer application, please see the release notes of your viewer.
 
   The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item
-    \declare{|autostart|}. Causes the movie to start playing immediately
-    when the page is shown. At most one movie can be started in this
-    way. The viewer application will typically be able to show at
-    most one movie at the same time anyway. When the page is no longer
-    shown, the movie immediately stops. This can be a problem if you
-    use the |\movie| command to include a sound that should be played
-    on after the page has been closed. In this case, the |\sound|
-    command must be used.
-  \item
-    \declare{|borderwidth=|}\meta{\TeX\ dimension}. Causes a border of
-    thickness \meta{\TeX\ dimension} to be drawn around the
-    movie. Some versions of the Acrobat Reader seem to have a bug and
-    do not display this border if is smaller than 0.5bp (about
-    0.51pt).
-  \item
-    \declare{|depth=|}\meta{\TeX\ dimension}. Overrides the depth of the
-    \meta{poster text} box and sets it to the given dimension.
-  \item
-    \declare{|duration=|}\meta{time}|s|. Specifies in seconds how long
-    the movie should be shown. The \meta{time} may be a fractional
-    value and must be followed by the letter |s|. For example,
-    |duration=1.5s| will show the movie for one and a half seconds. In
-    conjunction with the |start| option, you can ``cut out'' a part of
-    a movie for display.
-  \item
-    \declare{|externalviewer|}. As explained above, this causes an
-    external application to be launched for displaying the movie in a
-    separate window. Most options, like |duration| or |loop|, have no
-    effect since they are not passed along to the viewer application.
-  \item
-    \declare{|height=|}\meta{\TeX\ dimension}. Overrides the height of the
-    \meta{poster text} box and sets it to the given dimension.
-  \item
-    \declare{|label=|}\meta{movie label}. Assigns a label to the movie
-    such that it can later be referenced by the command
-    |\hyperlinkmovie|, which can be used to stop the movie or to show
-    a different part of it. The \meta{movie label} is not a normal
-    label. It should not be too fancy, since it is inserted literally
-    into the \pdf\ code. In particular, it should not contain closing
-    parentheses.
-  \item
-    \declare{|loop|}. Causes the movie to start again when the end has
-    been reached. Normally, the movie just stops at the end.
-  \item
-    \declare{|once|}. Causes the movie to just stop at the end. This is
-    the default.
-  \item
-    \declare{|open|}. Causes the player to stay open when the movie
-    has finished.
-  \item
-    \declare{|palindrome|}. Causes the movie to start playing backwards
-    when the end has been reached, and to start playing forward once
-    more when the beginning is reached, and so on.
-  \item
-    \declare{|poster|}. Asks the viewer application to show the first
-    image of the movie when the movie is not playing. Normally,
-    nothing is shown when the movie is not playing (and thus the box
-    containing the \meta{poster text} is shown). For a movie that does
-    not have any images (but sound) or for movies with an
-    uninformative first image this option is not so useful.
-  \item
+    \item
+    \declare{|autostart|}. Causes the movie to start playing immediately when the page is shown. At most one movie can be started in this way. The viewer application will typically be able to show at most one movie at the same time anyway. When the page is no longer shown, the movie immediately stops. This can be a problem if you use the |\movie| command to include a sound that should be played on after the page has been closed. In this case, the |\sound| command must be used.
+    \item
+    \declare{|borderwidth=|}\meta{\TeX\ dimension}. Causes a border of thickness \meta{\TeX\ dimension} to be drawn around the movie. Some versions of the Acrobat Reader seem to have a bug and do not display this border if is smaller than 0.5bp (about 0.51pt).
+    \item
+    \declare{|depth=|}\meta{\TeX\ dimension}. Overrides the depth of the \meta{poster text} box and sets it to the given dimension.
+    \item
+    \declare{|duration=|}\meta{time}|s|. Specifies in seconds how long the movie should be shown. The \meta{time} may be a fractional value and must be followed by the letter |s|. For example, |duration=1.5s| will show the movie for one and a half seconds. In conjunction with the |start| option, you can ``cut out'' a part of a movie for display.
+    \item
+    \declare{|externalviewer|}. As explained above, this causes an external application to be launched for displaying the movie in a separate window. Most options, like |duration| or |loop|, have no effect since they are not passed along to the viewer application.
+    \item
+    \declare{|height=|}\meta{\TeX\ dimension}. Overrides the height of the \meta{poster text} box and sets it to the given dimension.
+    \item
+    \declare{|label=|}\meta{movie label}. Assigns a label to the movie such that it can later be referenced by the command |\hyperlinkmovie|, which can be used to stop the movie or to show a different part of it. The \meta{movie label} is not a normal label. It should not be too fancy, since it is inserted literally into the \pdf\ code. In particular, it should not contain closing parentheses.
+    \item
+    \declare{|loop|}. Causes the movie to start again when the end has been reached. Normally, the movie just stops at the end.
+    \item
+    \declare{|once|}. Causes the movie to just stop at the end. This is the default.
+    \item
+    \declare{|open|}. Causes the player to stay open when the movie has finished.
+    \item
+    \declare{|palindrome|}. Causes the movie to start playing backwards when the end has been reached, and to start playing forward once more when the beginning is reached, and so on.
+    \item
+    \declare{|poster|}. Asks the viewer application to show the first image of the movie when the movie is not playing. Normally, nothing is shown when the movie is not playing (and thus the box containing the \meta{poster text} is shown). For a movie that does not have any images (but sound) or for movies with an uninformative first image this option is not so useful.
+    \item
     \declare{|repeat|} is the same as |loop|.
-  \item
-    \declare{|showcontrols=|}\meta{true or false}. Causes a control bar
-    to be displayed below the movie while it is playing. Instead of
-    |showcontrols=true| you can also just say |showcontrols|. By
-    default, no control bar is shown.
-  \item
-    \declare{|start=|}\meta{time}|s|. Causes the first
-    \meta{time} seconds of the movie to be skipped. For example,
-    |start=10s,duration=5s| will show seconds 10 to 15 of the movie,
-    when you play the movie.
-  \item
-    \declare{|width=|}\meta{\TeX dimension} works like the |height|
-    option, only for the width of the poster box.
+    \item
+    \declare{|showcontrols=|}\meta{true or false}. Causes a control bar to be displayed below the movie while it is playing. Instead of |showcontrols=true| you can also just say |showcontrols|. By default, no control bar is shown.
+    \item
+    \declare{|start=|}\meta{time}|s|. Causes the first \meta{time} seconds of the movie to be skipped. For example, |start=10s,duration=5s| will show seconds 10 to 15 of the movie, when you play the movie.
+    \item
+    \declare{|width=|}\meta{\TeX dimension} works like the |height| option, only for the width of the poster box.
   \end{itemize}
 
-  \example The following example creates a ``background sound'' for
-  the slide.
+  \example
+  The following example creates a ``background sound'' for the slide.
 \begin{verbatim}
 \movie[autostart]{}{test.wav}
 \end{verbatim}
-
-  \example A movie with two extra buttons for showing different parts
-  of the movie.
+  \example
+  A movie with two extra buttons for showing different parts of the movie.
 \begin{verbatim}
 \movie[label=cells,width=4cm,height=3cm,poster,showcontrols,duration=5s]{}{cells.avi}
 
 \end{verbatim}
 \end{command}
 
-A movie can serve as the destination of a special kind of hyperlink,
-namely a hyperlink introduced using the following command:
+A movie can serve as the destination of a special kind of hyperlink, namely a hyperlink introduced using the following command:
 
-\begin{command}{\hyperlinkmovie\oarg{options}\marg{movie
-      label}\marg{text}}
-  Causes the \meta{text} to become a movie hyperlink. When you click
-  on the \meta{text}, the movie with the label \meta{movie label} will
-  start to play (or stop or pause or resume, depending on the
-  \meta{options}). The movie must be on the same page as the
-  hyperlink.
+\begin{command}{\hyperlinkmovie\oarg{options}\marg{movie label}\marg{text}}
+  Causes the \meta{text} to become a movie hyperlink. When you click on the \meta{text}, the movie with the label \meta{movie label} will start to play (or stop or pause or resume, depending on the \meta{options}). The movie must be on the same page as the hyperlink.
 
-  The following \meta{options} may be given, many of which are the
-  same as for the |\movie| command; if a different option is given for
-  the link than for the movie itself, the option for the link takes precedence:
+  The following \meta{options} may be given, many of which are the same as for the |\movie| command; if a different option is given for the link than for the movie itself, the option for the link takes precedence:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item
-    \declare{|duration=|}\meta{time}|s|. As for |\movie|, this causes
-    the movie to be played only for the given number of seconds.
-  \item
-    \declare{|loop|} and \declare{|repeat|}.  As for |\movie|, this causes
-    the movie to loop.
-  \item
-    \declare{|once|}.  As for |\movie|, this causes
-    the movie to played only once.
-  \item
-    \declare{|palindrome|}.  As for |\movie|, this causes
-    the movie to be played forth and back.
-  \item
-    \declare{|pause|}. Causes the playback of the movie to be paused, if
-    the movie was currently playing. If not, nothing happens.
-  \item
-    \declare{|play|}. Causes the movie to be played from whatever start
-    position is specified. If the movie is already playing, it will be
-    stopped and restarted at the starting position. This is the default.
-  \item
-    \declare{|resume|}. Resumes playback of the movie, if it has
-    previously been paused. If has not been paused, but not started or
-    is already playing, nothing happens.
-  \item
-    \declare{|showcontrols=|}\meta{true or false}. As for |\movie|, this
-    causes a control bar to be shown or not shown during playback.
-  \item
-    \declare{|start=|}\meta{time}|s|. As for |\movie|, this causes
-    the given number of seconds to be skipped at the beginning of the
-    movie if |play| is used to start the movie.
-  \item
+    \item
+    \declare{|duration=|}\meta{time}|s|. As for |\movie|, this causes the movie to be played only for the given number of seconds.
+    \item
+    \declare{|loop|} and \declare{|repeat|}.  As for |\movie|, this causes the movie to loop.
+    \item
+    \declare{|once|}.  As for |\movie|, this causes the movie to played only once.
+    \item
+    \declare{|palindrome|}.  As for |\movie|, this causes the movie to be played forth and back.
+    \item
+    \declare{|pause|}. Causes the playback of the movie to be paused, if the movie was currently playing. If not, nothing happens.
+    \item
+    \declare{|play|}. Causes the movie to be played from whatever start position is specified. If the movie is already playing, it will be stopped and restarted at the starting position. This is the default.
+    \item
+    \declare{|resume|}. Resumes playback of the movie, if it has previously been paused. If has not been paused, but not started or is already playing, nothing happens.
+    \item
+    \declare{|showcontrols=|}\meta{true or false}. As for |\movie|, this causes a control bar to be shown or not shown during playback.
+    \item
+    \declare{|start=|}\meta{time}|s|. As for |\movie|, this causes the given number of seconds to be skipped at the beginning of the movie if |play| is used to start the movie.
+    \item
     \declare{|stop|}. Causes the playback of the movie to be stopped.
   \end{itemize}
 \end{command}
 
-
 \subsubsection{Animations Created by Showing Slides in Rapid Succession}
 
-You can create an animation in a portable way by using the
-overlay commands of the \beamer\ package to create a series of slides
-that, when shown in rapid succession, present an animation. This is a
-flexible approach, but such animations will typically be rather static
-since it will take some time to advance from one slide to the
-next. This approach is mostly useful for animations where you want
-to explain each ``picture'' of the animation.
-When you advance slides ``by hand,'' that is, by pressing a forward
-button, it typically takes at least a second for the next slide to
-show.
+You can create an animation in a portable way by using the overlay commands of the \beamer\ package to create a series of slides that, when shown in rapid succession, present an animation. This is a flexible approach, but such animations will typically be rather static since it will take some time to advance from one slide to the next. This approach is mostly useful for animations where you want to explain each ``picture'' of the animation. When you advance slides ``by hand,'' that is, by pressing a forward button, it typically takes at least a second for the next slide to show.
 
-More ``lively'' animations can be created by relying on a capability
-of the viewer program. Some programs support
-showing slides only for a certain number of seconds during a
-presentation (for the Acrobat Reader this works only in full-screen
-mode). By setting the number of seconds to zero, you can create a
-rapid succession of slides.
+More ``lively'' animations can be created by relying on a capability of the viewer program. Some programs support showing slides only for a certain number of seconds during a presentation (for the Acrobat Reader this works only in full-screen mode). By setting the number of seconds to zero, you can create a rapid succession of slides.
 
-To facilitate the creation of animations using this feature, the
-following commands can be used: |\animate| and |\animatevalue|.
+To facilitate the creation of animations using this feature, the following commands can be used: |\animate| and |\animatevalue|.
 
 \begin{command}{\animate\ssarg{overlay specification}}
-  The slides specified by \meta{overlay specification} will be shown
-  as quickly as  possible.
-\example
+  The slides specified by \meta{overlay specification} will be shown as quickly as possible.
+  \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \begin{frame}
   \frametitle{A Five Slide Animation}
   This command is ignored in |article| mode.
 \end{command}
 
-\begin{command}{\animatevalue|<|\meta{start slide}|-|\meta{end slide}|>|%
-    \marg{name}\marg{start value}\marg{end value}}
-  The \meta{name} must be the name of a counter or a dimension.
-  It will be varied between two values. For the slides in the
-  specified range, the counter or dimension is set to an interpolated
-  value that depends on the current slide number. On slides before the
-  \meta{start slide}, the counter or dimension is set to \meta{start
-    value}; on the slides after the \meta{end slide} it is set to
-  \meta{end value}.
+\begin{command}{\animatevalue|<|\meta{start slide}|-|\meta{end slide}|>| \marg{name}\marg{start value}\marg{end value}}
+  The \meta{name} must be the name of a counter or a dimension. It will be varied between two values. For the slides in the specified range, the counter or dimension is set to an interpolated value that depends on the current slide number. On slides before the \meta{start slide}, the counter or dimension is set to \meta{start value}; on the slides after the \meta{end slide} it is set to \meta{end value}.
   \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \newcount\opaqueness
   This command is ignored in |article| mode.
 \end{command}
 
-If your animation ``graphics'' reside in individual external graphic
-files, you might also consider using the |\multiinclude| command,
-which is explained in Section~\ref{section-mpmulti}, together with
-|\animate|. For example, you might create an animation like this,
-assuming you have created graphic files named |animation.1| through to
-|animation.10|:
-
+If your animation ``graphics'' reside in individual external graphic files, you might also consider using the |\multiinclude| command, which is explained in Section~\ref{section-mpmulti}, together with |\animate|. For example, you might create an animation like this, assuming you have created graphic files named |animation.1| through to |animation.10|:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \begin{frame}
   \animate<2-9>
 \end{frame}
 \end{verbatim}
 
-
-
-
-\subsubsection{Including External Animations Residing in Multiple
-  Image Files}
+\subsubsection{Including External Animations Residing in Multiple Image Files}
 \label{section-xmpmulti}
 \label{section-mpmulti}
 
-Some animations reside in external files in the following way: For
-each stage of the animation there is an image file containing
-an image for this stage. You can include such a series of images
-conveniently by using the style |mpmulti.sty| from the ppower4
-package. This style, written by Klaus Guntermann,
-introduces a command called |\multiinclude| that takes the base name
-of a graphic file like |mygraphic| and will then search for files
-called |mygraphic.0|, |mygraphic.1|, and so on, till no more files are
-found. It will then include these graphics files using the
-|\includegraphics| command, but will put these graphics ``on top of
-each other.'' Furthermore, and this is the important part,
-it inserts a |\pause| command after each graphic. This command is
-defined in the ppower4 package and has the same effect as the |\pause|
-command of \beamer. For this reason, both ppower4 and also \beamer\
-will first display the basic graphic and will then additionally show
-the next graphic on each slide.
+Some animations reside in external files in the following way: For each stage of the animation there is an image file containing an image for this stage. You can include such a series of images conveniently by using the style |mpmulti.sty| from the ppower4 package. This style, written by Klaus Guntermann, introduces a command called |\multiinclude| that takes the base name of a graphic file like |mygraphic| and will then search for files called |mygraphic.0|, |mygraphic.1|, and so on, till no more files are found. It will then include these graphics files using the |\includegraphics| command, but will put these graphics ``on top of each other.'' Furthermore, and this is the important part, it inserts a |\pause| command after each graphic. This command is defined in the ppower4 package and has the same effect as the |\pause| command of \beamer. For this reason, both ppower4 and also \beamer\ will first display the basic graphic and will then additionally show the next graphic on each slide.
 
-If you try to use |mpmulti.sty| directly, you will run into the
-problem that it includes a file called |pause.sty|, which is part of
-the ppower4 package.
+If you try to use |mpmulti.sty| directly, you will run into the problem that it includes a file called |pause.sty|, which is part of the ppower4 package.
 
-You might also consider using the style |xmpmulti.sty| that comes with
-\beamer. This file is mainly identical to |mpmulti|, except for two
-differences: First, it does not include |pause.sty|, a style that
-conceptually clashes with \beamer, although \beamer\ contains a
-workaround that sidesteps the problem. Second, it extends the
-|\multiinclude| command by allowing a special default overlay
-specification to be given. The effect of this is explained below.
+You might also consider using the style |xmpmulti.sty| that comes with \beamer. This file is mainly identical to |mpmulti|, except for two differences: First, it does not include |pause.sty|, a style that conceptually clashes with \beamer, although \beamer\ contains a workaround that sidesteps the problem. Second, it extends the |\multiinclude| command by allowing a special default overlay specification to be given. The effect of this is explained below.
 
 \begin{package}{{xmpmulti}}
-  Defines the command |\multiinclude|. The code of this package is
-  due to Klaus Guntermann with some additions of mine. It can used
-  together with \beamer\ and with ppower4, i.\,e., it can be used as a
-  replacement for |mpmulti| if the |pause| package is also included in
-  a ppower4-presentation.
+  Defines the command |\multiinclude|. The code of this package is due to Klaus Guntermann with some additions of mine. It can used together with \beamer\ and with ppower4, i.\,e., it can be used as a replacement for |mpmulti| if the |pause| package is also included in a ppower4-presentation.
 \end{package}
 
-\begin{command}{\multiinclude\opt{|[<|\meta{default overlay
-        specification}|>]|}\oarg{options}\marg{base file name}}
-  Except for the possibility of specifying a \meta{default overlay
-    specification}, this command is identical to the |\multiinclude|
-  command from the ppower4 package.
+\begin{command}{\multiinclude\opt{|[<|\meta{default overlay specification}|>]|}\oarg{options}\marg{base file name}}
+  Except for the possibility of specifying a \meta{default overlay specification}, this command is identical to the |\multiinclude| command from the ppower4 package.
 
-  If no overlay specification is given, the command will search for
-  files called \meta{base file name}|.|\meta{number} for increasing
-  numbers \meta{number}, starting with zero. As long as it finds these
-  files, it issues an |\includegraphics| command on them. The files
-  following the first one are put ``on top'' of the first one. Between
-  any two invocations of |\includegraphics|, a |\pause| command is
-  inserted. You can modify this behaviour is different ways by given
-  suitable \meta{options}, see below.
+  If no overlay specification is given, the command will search for files called \meta{base file name}|.|\meta{number} for increasing numbers \meta{number}, starting with zero. As long as it finds these files, it issues an |\includegraphics| command on them. The files following the first one are put ``on top'' of the first one. Between any two invocations of |\includegraphics|, a |\pause| command is inserted. You can modify this behaviour is different ways by given suitable \meta{options}, see below.
 
-  \example Assume that MetaPost has created files called |gra.0|,
-  |gra.1|, and |gra.2|. You can then create frame consisting of three
-  slides that incrementally show the graphic as follows:
-
+  \example
+  Assume that MetaPost has created files called |gra.0|, |gra.1|, and |gra.2|. You can then create frame consisting of three slides that incrementally show the graphic as follows:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \begin{frame}
   \multiinclude{gra}
 \end{frame}
 \end{verbatim}
+  The effect of providing a \meta{default overlay specification} is the following: First, no |\pause| command is inserted between graphics. Instead, each graphic is surrounded by an |actionenv| environment with the overlay specification set to \meta{default overlay specification}.
 
-  The effect of providing a \meta{default overlay specification} is
-  the following: First, no |\pause| command is inserted between
-  graphics. Instead, each graphic is surrounded by an |actionenv|
-  environment with the overlay specification set to \meta{default
-    overlay specification}.
+  \example
+  You can create the same effect as in the previous example using |\multiinclude[<+->]{gra}|.
 
-  \example You can create the same effect as in the previous example
-  using |\multiinclude[<+->]{gra}|.
-
-  \example For a more interesting usage of the \meta{default overlay
-    specification}, consider the following usage:
+  \example
+  For a more interesting usage of the \meta{default overlay specification}, consider the following usage:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \multiinclude[<alert@+| +->]{gra}
 \end{verbatim}
-  This will always paint the most recently added part of the graphic
-  in red (assuming you do not use special colors in the graphic
-  itself).
+  This will always paint the most recently added part of the graphic in red (assuming you do not use special colors in the graphic itself).
 
-  \example In order to have each graphic completely \emph{replace} the
-  previous one, you could use |\multiinclude[<+>]{gra}|.
+  \example
+  In order to have each graphic completely \emph{replace} the previous one, you could use |\multiinclude[<+>]{gra}|.
 
-  The following \meta{options} may be given (these are the same as for
-  the original command from the ppower4 package):
+  The following \meta{options} may be given (these are the same as for the original command from the ppower4 package):
   \begin{itemize}
   \item
-    \declare{|pause=|\meta{command}} replaces the default pausing
-    command |\pause| by \meta{command}. If a \meta{default overlay
-      specification} is given, the default pausing command is empty;
-    otherwise it is |\pause|. Note that commands like |\pauselevel|
-    are not available in |\beamer|.
+    \declare{|pause=|\meta{command}} replaces the default pausing command |\pause| by \meta{command}. If a \meta{default overlay specification} is given, the default pausing command is empty; otherwise it is |\pause|. Note that commands like |\pauselevel| are not available in |\beamer|.
   \item
-    \declare{|graphics=|\meta{options}} passes the \meta{options} to
-    the |\includegraphics| command.
+    \declare{|graphics=|\meta{options}} passes the \meta{options} to the |\includegraphics| command.
 
     \example |\multiinclude[graphics={height=5cm}]{gra}|
   \item
-    \declare{|format=|\meta{extension}} will cause the file names for
-    which we search change from \meta{base file name}|.|\meta{number}
-    to \meta{base file name}|-|\meta{number}|.|\meta{extension}. Note
-    the change from the dot to a hyphen. This option allows you to
-    include, say, |.jpg| files.
+    \declare{|format=|\meta{extension}} will cause the file names for which we search change from \meta{base file name}|.|\meta{number} to \meta{base file name}|-|\meta{number}|.|\meta{extension}. Note the change from the dot to a hyphen. This option allows you to include, say, |.jpg| files.
   \item
-    \declare{|start=|\meta{number}} specifies the start
-    \meta{number}. The default is zero.
+    \declare{|start=|\meta{number}} specifies the start \meta{number}. The default is zero.
   \item
-    \declare{|end=|\meta{number}} specifies the end
-    \meta{number}. The default is infinity.
+    \declare{|end=|\meta{number}} specifies the end \meta{number}. The default is infinity.
   \end{itemize}
 \end{command}
 
-Note that, if you do not use the |format=| option, the
-|\includegraphics| command will be somewhat at a loss in which format
-your graphic file actually is. After all, it ends with the cryptic
-``format suffix'' |.0| or |.1|. You can tell |\includegraphics| that
-any file having a suffix it knows nothing about is actually in format,
-say, |.mps|, using the following command:
+Note that, if you do not use the |format=| option, the |\includegraphics| command will be somewhat at a loss in which format your graphic file actually is. After all, it ends with the cryptic ``format suffix'' |.0| or |.1|. You can tell |\includegraphics| that any file having a suffix it knows nothing about is actually in format, say, |.mps|, using the following command:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \DeclareGraphicsRule{*}{mps}{*}{}
 \end{verbatim}
 
-
-
-
-
-
-
 \subsection{Sounds}
 \label{section-sound}
-You can include sounds in a presentation. Such sound can be played
-when you open a slide or when a certain button is clicked. The
-commands for including sounds are defined in the package |multimedia|,
-which is introduced in Section~\ref{section-multimedia}.
 
-As was already pointed out in Section~\ref{section-multimedia}, a
-sound can be included in a \pdf\ presentation by treating it as a
-movie and using the |\movie| command. While this is perfectly
-sufficient in most cases, there are two cases where this approach is
-not satisfactory:
+You can include sounds in a presentation. Such sound can be played when you open a slide or when a certain button is clicked. The commands for including sounds are defined in the package |multimedia|, which is introduced in Section~\ref{section-multimedia}.
+
+As was already pointed out in Section~\ref{section-multimedia}, a sound can be included in a \pdf\ presentation by treating it as a movie and using the |\movie| command. While this is perfectly sufficient in most cases, there are two cases where this approach is not satisfactory:
 \begin{enumerate}
-\item
-  When a page is closed, any playing movie is immediately
-  stopped. Thus, you cannot use the |\movie| command to create sounds
-  that persist for a longer time.
-\item
+  \item
+  When a page is closed, any playing movie is immediately stopped. Thus, you cannot use the |\movie| command to create sounds that persist for a longer time.
+  \item
   You cannot play two movies at the same time.
 \end{enumerate}
 
-The \pdf\ specification introduces special sound objects, which are
-treated quite differently from movie objects. You can create a sound
-object using the command |\sound|, which is somewhat similar to
-|\movie|. There also exists a |\hyperlinksound| command, which is
-similar to |\hyperlinkmovie|. While it is conceptually better to use
-|\sound| for sounds, there are a number of things to consider before
-using it:
+The \pdf\ specification introduces special sound objects, which are treated quite differently from movie objects. You can create a sound object using the command |\sound|, which is somewhat similar to |\movie|. There also exists a |\hyperlinksound| command, which is similar to |\hyperlinkmovie|. While it is conceptually better to use |\sound| for sounds, there are a number of things to consider before using it:
 \begin{itemize}
-\item
-  Several sounds \emph{can} be played at the same time. In particular,
-  it is possible to play a general sound in parallel to a (hopefully
-  silent) movie.
-\item
-  A sound playback \emph{can} persist after the current page is closed
-  (though it need not).
-\item
-  The data of a sound file \emph{can} be completely embedded in a
-  \pdf\ file, obliberating the need to ``carry around'' other files.
-\item
-  The sound objects do \emph{not} work together with |dvips| and
-  |ps2pdf|. They only work with |pdflatex|.
-\item
-  There is much less control over what part of a sound should be
-  played. In particular, no control bar is shown and you can
-  specify neither the start time nor the duration.
-\item
-  A bug in some versions of the Acrobat Reader makes it necessary to
-  provide very exact details on the encoding of the sound file. You
-  have to provide the sampling rate, the number of channels (mono or
-  stereo), the number of bits per sample, and the sample encoding
-  method (raw, signed, Alaw or $\mu$law). If you do not know this data
-  or provide it incorrectly, the sound will be played incorrectly.
-\item
-  It seems  that you can only include uncompressed sound data,
-  which can easily become huge. This is not required by the
-  specification, but I have been unable to make the Acrobat Reader
-  play any compressed data. Data formats that \emph{do} work are
-  |.aif| and |.au|.
+  \item
+  Several sounds \emph{can} be played at the same time. In particular, it is possible to play a general sound in parallel to a (hopefully silent) movie.
+  \item
+  A sound playback \emph{can} persist after the current page is closed (though it need not).
+  \item
+  The data of a sound file \emph{can} be completely embedded in a \pdf\ file, obliberating the need to ``carry around'' other files.
+  \item
+  The sound objects do \emph{not} work together with |dvips| and |ps2pdf|. They only work with |pdflatex|.
+  \item
+  There is much less control over what part of a sound should be played. In particular, no control bar is shown and you can specify neither the start time nor the duration.
+  \item
+  A bug in some versions of the Acrobat Reader makes it necessary to provide very exact details on the encoding of the sound file. You have to provide the sampling rate, the number of channels (mono or stereo), the number of bits per sample, and the sample encoding method (raw, signed, Alaw or $\mu$law). If you do not know this data or provide it incorrectly, the sound will be played incorrectly.
+  \item
+  It seems  that you can only include uncompressed sound data, which can easily become huge. This is not required by the specification, but I have been unable to make the Acrobat Reader play any compressed data. Data formats that \emph{do} work are |.aif| and |.au|.
 \end{itemize}
 
+\begin{command}{\sound\oarg{options}\marg{sound poster text}\marg{sound filename}}
+  This command will insert the sound with the filename \meta{sound filename} into the \pdf\ file. As for |\movie|, the file must be accessible when the sound is to be played. Unlike |\movie|, you can however use the option |inlinesound| to actually embed the sound data in the \pdf\ file.
 
-\begin{command}{\sound\oarg{options}\marg{sound poster text}\marg{sound
-      filename}}
-  This command will insert the sound with the filename \meta{sound
-    filename} into the \pdf\ file. As for |\movie|, the file must be
-  accessible when the sound is to be played. Unlike |\movie|, you can
-  however use the option |inlinesound| to actually embed the sound
-  data in the \pdf\ file.
+  Also as for a movie, the \meta{sound poster text} will be be put in a box that, when clicked on, will start playing the movie. However, you might also leave this box empty and only use the |autostart| option. Once playback of a sound has started, it can only be stopped by starting the playback of a different sound or by use of the |\hyperlinkmute| command.
 
-  Also as for a movie, the \meta{sound poster text} will be be put in
-  a box that, when clicked on, will start playing the movie. However,
-  you might also leave this box empty and only use the |autostart|
-  option. Once playback of a sound has started, it can only be stopped
-  by starting the playback of a different sound or by use of the
-  |\hyperlinkmute| command.
+  The supported sound formats depend on the viewer application. My version of the Acrobat Reader supports |.aif| and |.au|. I also need to specify information like the sampling rate, even though this information could be extracted from the sound file and even though the \pdf\ standard specifies that the viewer application should do so. In this regard, my version of the Acrobat Reader seems to be non-standard-conforming.
 
-  The supported sound formats depend on the viewer application. My
-  version of the Acrobat Reader supports |.aif| and |.au|. I also need
-  to specify information like the sampling rate, even though this
-  information could be extracted from the sound file and even though
-  the \pdf\ standard specifies that the viewer application should do
-  so. In this regard, my version of the Acrobat Reader seems to be
-  non-standard-conforming.
-
-  This command only works together with |pdflatex|. If you use
-  |dvips|, the poster is still shown, but clicking it has no effect
-  and no sound is embedded in any way.
+  This command only works together with |pdflatex|. If you use |dvips|, the poster is still shown, but clicking it has no effect and no sound is embedded in any way.
 
   \example
   |\sound[autostart,samplingrate=22050]{}{applause.au}|
 
   The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item
-    \declare{|autostart|}. Causes the sound to start playing immediately
-    when the page is shown.
-  \item
-    \declare{|automute|}. Causes all sounds to be muted when the current
-    page is left.
-  \item
-    \declare{|bitspersample=|}\meta{8 or 16}. Specifies the number of
-    bits per sample in the sound file. If this number is 16, this
-    option need not be specified.
-  \item
-    \declare{|channels=|}\meta{1 or 2}. Specifies whether the sound is
-    mono or stereo. If the sound is mono, this option need not be specified.
-  \item
-    \declare{|depth=|}\meta{\TeX\ dimension}. Overrides the depth of the
-    \meta{sound poster text} box and sets it to the given dimension.
-  \item
-    \declare{|encoding=|}\meta{method}. Specifies the encoding method,
-    which may be |Raw|, |Signed|, |muLaw|, or |ALaw|. If the method is
-    |muLaw|, this option need not be specified.
-  \item
-    \declare{|height=|}\meta{\TeX\ dimension}. Overrides the height of the
-    \meta{sound poster text} box and sets it to the given dimension.
-  \item
-    \declare{|inlinesound|} causes the sound data to be stored directly
-    in the \pdf-file.
-  \item
-    \declare{|label=|}\meta{sound label}. Assigns a label to the sound
-    such that it can later be referenced by the command
-    |\hyperlinksound|, which can be used to start a sound. The
-    \meta{sound label} is not a normal label.
-  \item
-    \declare{|loop|} or \declare{|repeat|}. Causes the sound to start
-    again when the end has been reached.
-  \item
-    \declare{|mixsound=|}\meta{true or false}. If set to |true|, the
-    sound is played in addition to any sound that is already
-    playing. If set to |false| all other sounds (though not sound from
-    movies) are stopped before the sound is played. The default is
-    |false|.
-  \item
-    \declare{|samplingrate=|}\meta{number}. Specifies the number of
-    samples per second in the sound file. If this number is 44100,
-    this option need not be specified.
-  \item
-    \declare{|width=|}\meta{\TeX\ dimension} works like the |height|
-    option, only for the width of the poster box.
+    \item
+    \declare{|autostart|}. Causes the sound to start playing immediately when the page is shown.
+    \item
+    \declare{|automute|}. Causes all sounds to be muted when the current page is left.
+    \item
+    \declare{|bitspersample=|}\meta{8 or 16}. Specifies the number of bits per sample in the sound file. If this number is 16, this option need not be specified.
+    \item
+    \declare{|channels=|}\meta{1 or 2}. Specifies whether the sound is mono or stereo. If the sound is mono, this option need not be specified.
+    \item
+    \declare{|depth=|}\meta{\TeX\ dimension}. Overrides the depth of the \meta{sound poster text} box and sets it to the given dimension.
+    \item
+    \declare{|encoding=|}\meta{method}. Specifies the encoding method, which may be |Raw|, |Signed|, |muLaw|, or |ALaw|. If the method is |muLaw|, this option need not be specified.
+    \item
+    \declare{|height=|}\meta{\TeX\ dimension}. Overrides the height of the \meta{sound poster text} box and sets it to the given dimension.
+    \item
+    \declare{|inlinesound|} causes the sound data to be stored directly in the \pdf-file.
+    \item
+    \declare{|label=|}\meta{sound label}. Assigns a label to the sound such that it can later be referenced by the command |\hyperlinksound|, which can be used to start a sound. The \meta{sound label} is not a normal label.
+    \item
+    \declare{|loop|} or \declare{|repeat|}. Causes the sound to start again when the end has been reached.
+    \item
+    \declare{|mixsound=|}\meta{true or false}. If set to |true|, the sound is played in addition to any sound that is already playing. If set to |false| all other sounds (though not sound from movies) are stopped before the sound is played. The default is |false|.
+    \item
+    \declare{|samplingrate=|}\meta{number}. Specifies the number of samples per second in the sound file. If this number is 44100, this option need not be specified.
+    \item
+    \declare{|width=|}\meta{\TeX\ dimension} works like the |height| option, only for the width of the poster box.
   \end{itemize}
 
-  \example The following example creates a ``background sound'' for
-  the slide, assuming that |applause.au| is encoded correctly (44100
-  samples per second, mono, $\mu$law encoded, 16 bits per sample).
+  \example
+  The following example creates a ``background sound'' for the slide, assuming that |applause.au| is encoded correctly (44100 samples per second, mono, $\mu$law encoded, 16 bits per sample).
 \begin{verbatim}
 \sound[autostart]{}{applause.au}
 \end{verbatim}
 \end{command}
 
-Just like movies, sounds can also serve as  destinations of special
-sound hyperlinks.
+Just like movies, sounds can also serve as  destinations of special sound hyperlinks.
 
-\begin{command}{\hyperlinksound\oarg{options}\marg{sound
-      label}\marg{text}}
-  Causes the \meta{text} to become a sound hyperlink. When you click
-  on the \meta{text}, the sound with the label \meta{sound label} will
-  start to play.
+\begin{command}{\hyperlinksound\oarg{options}\marg{sound label}\marg{text}}
+  Causes the \meta{text} to become a sound hyperlink. When you click on the \meta{text}, the sound with the label \meta{sound label} will start to play.
 
   The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item
-    \declare{|loop|} or \declare{|repeat|}. Causes the sound to start
-    again when the end has been reached.
-  \item
-    \declare{|mixsound=|}\meta{true or false}. If set to |true|, the
-    sound is played in addition to any sound that is already
-    playing. If set to |false| all other sounds (though not sound from
-    movies) are stopped before the sound is played. The default is
-    |false|.
+    \item
+    \declare{|loop|} or \declare{|repeat|}. Causes the sound to start again when the end has been reached.
+    \item
+    \declare{|mixsound=|}\meta{true or false}. If set to |true|, the sound is played in addition to any sound that is already playing. If set to |false| all other sounds (though not sound from movies) are stopped before the sound is played. The default is |false|.
   \end{itemize}
 \end{command}
 
-Since there is no direct way of stopping the playback of a sound, the
-following command is useful:
-
+Since there is no direct way of stopping the playback of a sound, the following command is useful:
 
 \begin{command}{\hyperlinkmute\marg{text}}
-  Causes the \meta{text} to become a hyperlink that, when clicked,
-  stops the playback of all sounds.
+  Causes the \meta{text} to become a hyperlink that, when clicked, stops the playback of all sounds.
 \end{command}
 
 
-
-
 \subsection{Slide Transitions}
 
-\textsc{pdf} in general, and the Acrobat Reader in particular, offer a
-standardized way of defining \emph{slide transitions}. Such a
-transition is a visual effect that is used to show the slide. For
-example, instead of just showing the slide immediately, whatever was
-shown before might slowly ``dissolve'' and be replaced by the slide's
-content.
+\pdf\ in general, and the Acrobat Reader in particular, offer a standardized way of defining \emph{slide transitions}. Such a transition is a visual effect that is used to show the slide. For example, instead of just showing the slide immediately, whatever was shown before might slowly ``dissolve'' and be replaced by the slide's content.
 
-There are a number of commands that can be used to specify what effect
-should be used when the current slide is presented. Consider the
-following example:
-
+There are a number of commands that can be used to specify what effect should be used when the current slide is presented. Consider the following example:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \frame{\pgfuseimage{youngboy}}
 \frame{
   \pgfuseimage{man}
 }
 \end{verbatim}
-The command |\transdissolve| causes the slide of the
-second frame to be shown in a ``dissolved way.'' Note that the
-dissolving is a property of the second frame, not of the first one. We
-could have placed the command anywhere on the frame.
+The command |\transdissolve| causes the slide of the second frame to be shown in a ``dissolved way.'' Note that the dissolving is a property of the second frame, not of the first one. We could have placed the command anywhere on the frame.
 
-The transition commands are overlay-specification-aware. We could
-collapse the two frames into one frame like this:
+The transition commands are overlay-specification-aware. We could collapse the two frames into one frame like this:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \begin{frame}
   \only<1>{\pgfuseimage{youngboy}}
   \transdissolve<2>
 \end{frame}
 \end{verbatim}
-This states that on the first slide the young boy should be shown, on
-the second slide the old man should be shown, and when the second
-slide is shown, it should be  shown in a ``dissolved way.''
+This states that on the first slide the young boy should be shown, on the second slide the old man should be shown, and when the second slide is shown, it should be shown in a ``dissolved way.''
 
-In the following, the different commands for creating transitional
-effects are listed. All of them take an optional argument that may
-contain a list of \meta{key}|=|\meta{value} pairs. The following
-options are possible:
+In the following, the different commands for creating transitional effects are listed. All of them take an optional argument that may contain a list of \meta{key}|=|\meta{value} pairs. The following options are possible:
 
 \begin{itemize}
-\item
-  |duration=|\meta{seconds}. Specifies the number of \meta{seconds}
-  the transition effect needs. Default is one second, but often a
-  shorter one (like 0.2 seconds) is more appropriate. Viewer
-  applications, especially Acrobat, may interpret this option in
-  slightly strange ways.
-\item
-  |direction=|\meta{degree}. For ``directed'' effects, this option
-  specifies the effect's direction. Allowed values are |0|, |90|,
-  |180|, |270|, and for the glitter effect also |315|.
+  \item
+  |duration=|\meta{seconds}. Specifies the number of \meta{seconds} the transition effect needs. Default is one second, but often a shorter one (like 0.2 seconds) is more appropriate. Viewer applications, especially Acrobat, may interpret this option in slightly strange ways.
+  \item
+  |direction=|\meta{degree}. For ``directed'' effects, this option specifies the effect's direction. Allowed values are |0|, |90|, |180|, |270|, and for the glitter effect also |315|.
 \end{itemize}
 
 \articlenote
 \end{command}
 
 \begin{command}{\transboxout\sarg{overlay specification}\oarg{options}}
-  Show the slide by showing more and more of a rectangular area that
-  is centered on the slide center.
+  Show the slide by showing more and more of a rectangular area that is centered on the slide center.
   \example|\transboxout|
 \end{command}
 
 \end{command}
 
 \begin{command}{\transglitter\sarg{overlay specification}\oarg{options}}
-  Show the slide with a glitter effect that sweeps in the specified
-  direction.
+  Show the slide with a glitter effect that sweeps in the specified direction.
   \example|\transglitter<2-3>[direction=90]|
 \end{command}
 
 \end{command}
 
 \begin{command}{\transwipe\sarg{overlay specification}\oarg{options}}
-  Show the slide by sweeping a single line in the specified direction,
-  thereby ``wiping out'' the previous contents.
+  Show the slide by sweeping a single line in the specified direction, thereby ``wiping out'' the previous contents.
   \example|\transwipe[direction=90]|
 \end{command}
 
-
-You can also specify how \emph{long} a given slide should be shown,
-using the following overlay-specification-aware command:
+You can also specify how \emph{long} a given slide should be shown, using the following overlay-specification-aware command:
 
 \begin{command}{\transduration\sarg{overlay specification}\marg{number of seconds}}
-  In full screen mode, show the slide for \meta{number of seconds}.
-  If zero is specified, the slide is shown as short as possible. This
-  can be used to create interesting pseudo-animations.
+  In full screen mode, show the slide for \meta{number of seconds}. If zero is specified, the slide is shown as short as possible. This can be used to create interesting pseudo-animations.
   \example|\transduration<2>{1}|
 \end{command}
-
-
-
-

doc/beamerug-color.tex

 
 \label{section-colors}
 
-\beamer's color management allows you to specify the color of every
-element (like, say, the color of the section entries in a table of
-contents or, say, the color of the subsection entries in a mini table
-of contents in a sidebar). While the system is quite powerful, it is
-not trivial to use. To simplify the usage of the color system, you
-should consider using a predefined color theme, which takes care of
-everything for you.
+\beamer's color management allows you to specify the color of every element (like, say, the color of the section entries in a table of contents or, say, the color of the subsection entries in a mini table of contents in a sidebar). While the system is quite powerful, it is not trivial to use. To simplify the usage of the color system, you should consider using a predefined color theme, which takes care of everything for you.
 
-In the following, color themes are explained first. The rest of the
-section consists of explanations of how the color management works
-internally. You will need to read these sections only if you wish to
-write your own color themes; or if you are quite happy with the
-predefined themes but you absolutely insist that displayed
-mathematical text simply has to be typeset in a lovely pink.
-
+In the following, color themes are explained first. The rest of the section consists of explanations of how the color management works internally. You will need to read these sections only if you wish to write your own color themes; or if you are quite happy with the predefined themes but you absolutely insist that displayed mathematical text simply has to be typeset in a lovely pink.
 
 
 \subsection{Color Themes}
 
-In order to also show the effect of the different color themes on the
-sidebar, in the following examples the color themes are used together
-with the outer theme |sidebar|.
+In order to also show the effect of the different color themes on the sidebar, in the following examples the color themes are used together with the outer theme |sidebar|.
 
 \subsubsection{Default and Special-Purpose Color Themes}
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{default}
-  The |default| color theme is very sober. It installs little special
-  colors and even less backgrounds. The default color theme sets up
-  the default parent relations between the different \beamer-colors.
+  The |default| color theme is very sober. It installs little special colors and even less backgrounds. The default color theme sets up the default parent relations between the different \beamer-colors.
 
   The main colors set in the |default| color theme are the following:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item
+    \item
     |normal text| is black on white.
-  \item
+    \item
     |alerted text| is red.
-  \item
+    \item
     |example text| is a dark green (green with 50\% black).
-  \item
-    |structure| is set to a light version of MidnightBlue
-    (more precisely, 20\% red, 20\% green, and 70\% blue).
+    \item
+    |structure| is set to a light version of MidnightBlue (more precisely, 20\% red, 20\% green, and 70\% blue).
   \end{itemize}
-  Use this theme for a no-nonsense presentation. Since this theme is
-  loaded by default, you cannot ``reload'' it after having loaded
-  another color theme.
+  Use this theme for a no-nonsense presentation. Since this theme is loaded by default, you cannot ``reload'' it after having loaded another color theme.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}[\oarg{options}]{structure}
   The example was created using |\usecolortheme[named=SeaGreen]{structure}|.
 
-  This theme offers a convenient way of changing the color used for
-  structural elements. More precisely, it just changes the foreground
-  of the \beamer-color |structure|. You can also achieve this by
-  directly invoking the function |\setbeamercolor|, but this color
-  theme makes things a bit easier.
+  This theme offers a convenient way of changing the color used for structural elements. More precisely, it just changes the foreground of the \beamer-color |structure|. You can also achieve this by directly invoking the function |\setbeamercolor|, but this color theme makes things a bit easier.
 
-  The theme offers several \meta{options}, which can be used to
-  specify the color to be used for structural elements:
+  The theme offers several \meta{options}, which can be used to specify the color to be used for structural elements:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item
-    \declare{|rgb=|\marg{rgb tuple}} sets the |structure| foreground
-    to the specified red-green-blue tuple. The numbers are given as
-    decimals between 0 and 1. For example, |rgb={0.5,0,0}| yields a
-    dark red.
-  \item
-    \declare{|RGB=|\marg{rgb tuple}} does the same as |rgb|, except
-    that the numbers range between 0 and 255. For example,
-    |RGB={128,0,0}|  yields a dark red.
-  \item
-    \declare{|cmyk=|\marg{cmyk tuple}} sets the |structure| foreground
-    to the specified cyan-magenta-yellow-black tuple. The numbers are
-    given as decimals between 0 and 1. For example, |cmyk={0,1,1,0.5}|
-    yields a dark red.
-  \item
-    \declare{|cmy=|\marg{cmy tuple}} is similar to |cmyk|, except that
-    the black component is not specified.
-  \item
-    \declare{|hsb=|\marg{hsb tuple}}  sets the |structure| foreground
-    to the specified hue-saturation-brightness tuple. The numbers are
-    given as decimals between 0 and 1. For example, |hsb={0,1,.5}|
-    yields a dark red.
-  \item
-    \declare{|named=|\marg{color name}} sets the |structure| foreground
-    to a named color. This color must previously have been defined
-    using the |\DefineNamedColor| command. Adding the class option
-    |xcolor=dvipsnames| will install a long list of standard
-    names. See the file |dvipsnam.def| for the list.
+    \item
+    \declare{|rgb=|\marg{rgb tuple}} sets the |structure| foreground to the specified red-green-blue tuple. The numbers are given as decimals between 0 and 1. For example, |rgb={0.5,0,0}| yields a dark red.
+    \item
+    \declare{|RGB=|\marg{rgb tuple}} does the same as |rgb|, except that the numbers range between 0 and 255. For example, |RGB={128,0,0}|  yields a dark red.
+    \item
+    \declare{|cmyk=|\marg{cmyk tuple}} sets the |structure| foreground to the specified cyan-magenta-yellow-black tuple. The numbers are given as decimals between 0 and 1. For example, |cmyk={0,1,1,0.5}| yields a dark red.
+    \item
+    \declare{|cmy=|\marg{cmy tuple}} is similar to |cmyk|, except that the black component is not specified.
+    \item
+    \declare{|hsb=|\marg{hsb tuple}}  sets the |structure| foreground to the specified hue-saturation-brightness tuple. The numbers are given as decimals between 0 and 1. For example, |hsb={0,1,.5}| yields a dark red.
+    \item
+    \declare{|named=|\marg{color name}} sets the |structure| foreground to a named color. This color must previously have been defined using the |\DefineNamedColor| command. Adding the class option |xcolor=dvipsnames| or |xcolor=svgnames| will install a long list of standard |dvips| or SVG color names (respectively). See the file |dvipsnam.def| for the list.
   \end{itemize}
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{sidebartab}
-  This theme changes the colors in a sidebar such that the current
-  entry in a table of contents shown there gets highlighted by showing a
-  different background behind it.
+  This theme changes the colors in a sidebar such that the current entry in a table of contents shown there gets highlighted by showing a different background behind it.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
-
-
 \subsubsection{Complete Color Themes}
 
-A ``complete'' color theme is a color theme that completely specifies
-all colors for all parts of a frame. It installs specific colors and
-does not derive the colors from, say, the |structure| \beamer-color.
-Complete color themes happen to have names of flying animals.
+A ``complete'' color theme is a color theme that completely specifies all colors for all parts of a frame. It installs specific colors and does not derive the colors from, say, the |structure| \beamer-color. Complete color themes happen to have names of flying animals.
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{albatross}
-  The color theme is a ``dark'' or ``inverted'' theme using yellow on
-  blue as the main colors. The color theme also installs a slightly
-  darker background color for blocks, which is necessary for
-  presentation themes that use shadows, but which (in my opinion) is
-  undesirable for all other presentation themes. By using the |lily|
-  color theme together with this theme, the backgrounds for blocks can
-  be removed.
+  The color theme is a ``dark'' or ``inverted'' theme using yellow on blue as the main colors. The color theme also installs a slightly darker background color for blocks, which is necessary for presentation themes that use shadows, but which (in my opinion) is undesirable for all other presentation themes. By using the |lily| color theme together with this theme, the backgrounds for blocks can be removed.
 
-  When using a light-on-dark theme like this one, be aware that there
-  are certain disadvantages:
+  When using a light-on-dark theme like this one, be aware that there are certain disadvantages:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item
-    If the room in which the talk is given has been ``darkened,''
-    using such a theme makes it more difficult for the audience to
-    take or read notes.
-  \item
-    Since the room becomes darker, the pupil becomes larger, thus
-    making it harder for the eye to focus. This \emph{can} make text
-    harder to  read.
-  \item
+    \item
+    If the room in which the talk is given has been ``darkened,'' using such a theme makes it more difficult for the audience to take or read notes.
+    \item
+    Since the room becomes darker, the pupil becomes larger, thus making it harder for the eye to focus. This \emph{can} make text harder to read.
+    \item
     Printing such slides is difficult at best.
   \end{itemize}
 
-  On the other hand, a light-on-dark presentation often appears to be
-  more ``stylish''  than a plain black-on-white one.
+  On the other hand, a light-on-dark presentation often appears to be more ``stylish'' than a plain black-on-white one.
 
   The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item \declare{|overlystylish|} installs a background canvas that
-    is, in my opinion, way too stylish. But then, I do not want
-    to press my taste on other people. When using this option, it is
-    probably a very good idea to also use the |lily| color theme.
+    \item
+    \declare{|overlystylish|} installs a background canvas that is, in my opinion, way too stylish. But then, I do not want to press my taste on other people. When using this option, it is probably a very good idea to also use the |lily| color theme.
   \end{itemize}
 
-  \example The |overlystylish| option together with the |lily| color theme:
-  \genericthemeexample{colorthemealbatrossstylish}
+  \example
+  The |overlystylish| option together with the |lily| color theme: \genericthemeexample{colorthemealbatrossstylish}
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
+\begin{colorthemeexample}{beetle}
+  The main ``theme behind this theme'' is to use white and black text on gray background. The white text is used for special emphasis, the black text for normal text. The ``outer stuff'' like the headline and the footline use, however, a bluish color. To change this color, change the background of |palette primary|.
 
-\begin{colorthemeexample}{beetle}
-  The main ``theme behind this theme'' is to use white and black text
-  on gray background. The white text is used for special emphasis, the
-  black text for normal text. The ``outer stuff'' like the headline
-  and the footline use, however, a bluish color. To change this color,
-  change the background of |palette primary|.
+  Great care must be taken with this theme since both the white/gray and the black/gray contrasts are much lower than with other themes. Make sure that the contrast is high enough for the actual presentation.
 
-  Great care must be taken with this theme since both the white/gray
-  and the black/gray contrasts are much lower than with other
-  themes. Make sure that the contrast is high enough for the actual
-  presentation.
-
-  You can change the ``grayish'' background by changing the background
-  of |normal text|.
+  You can change the ``grayish'' background by changing the background of |normal text|.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{crane}
-  This theme uses the colors of Lufthansa, whose logo is a crane.
-  It is \emph{not} an official theme by that company, however.
+  This theme uses the colors of Lufthansa, whose logo is a crane. It is \emph{not} an official theme by that company, however.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{dove}
-  This theme is nearly a black and white theme and useful for creating
-  presentations that are easy to print on a black-and-white
-  printer. The theme uses grayscale in certain unavoidable cases, but
-  never color. It also changes the font of alerted text to boldface.
+  This theme is nearly a black and white theme and useful for creating presentations that are easy to print on a black-and-white printer. The theme uses grayscale in certain unavoidable cases, but never color. It also changes the font of alerted text to boldface.
 
-  When using this theme, you should consider using the class option
-  |gray|, which ensures that all colors are converted to
-  grayscale. Also consider using the |structurebold| font theme.
+  When using this theme, you should consider using the class option |gray|, which ensures that all colors are converted to grayscale. Also consider using the |structurebold| font theme.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
-
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{fly}
-  This theme is the ``consequent'' version  of |beetle| and uses
-  white/black/gray throughout. It does not go particularly well with
-  themes that use shadows.
+  This theme is the ``consequent'' version of |beetle| and uses white/black/gray throughout. It does not go particularly well with themes that use shadows.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{seagull}
-  Like the |dove| color theme, this theme is useful for printing on a
-  black-and-white printer. However, it uses different shades of gray
-  extensively, which may or may not look good on a transparency.
+  Like the |dove| color theme, this theme is useful for printing on a black-and-white printer. However, it uses different shades of gray extensively, which may or may not look good on a transparency.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
-
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{wolverine}
-  The theme is based on the colors of the University of Michigan's
-  mascot, a wolverine.
+  The theme is based on the colors of the University of Michigan's mascot, a wolverine.
 
   \themeauthor Madhusudan Singh.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
-
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{beaver}
   The theme is based on the colors of the MIT's mascot, a beaver.
 
   \themeauthor Madhusudan Singh.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
-
 \subsubsection{Inner Color Themes}
 
-Inner color themes only specify the colors of elements used in inner
-themes. Most noticably, they specify the colors used for blocks. They can
-be used together with other (color) themes. If they are used to change the
-inner colors installed by a presentation theme or another color theme,
-they should obviously be specified \emph{after} the other theme has
-been loaded. Inner color themes happen to have flower names.
+Inner color themes only specify the colors of elements used in inner themes. Most noticably, they specify the colors used for blocks. They can be used together with other (color) themes. If they are used to change the inner colors installed by a presentation theme or another color theme, they should obviously be specified \emph{after} the other theme has been loaded. Inner color themes happen to have flower names.
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{lily}
-  This theme is mainly used to \emph{uninstall} any block colors setup
-  by another theme, restoring the colors used in the |default|
-  theme. In particular, using this theme will remove all background
-  colors for blocks.
+  This theme is mainly used to \emph{uninstall} any block colors setup by another theme, restoring the colors used in the |default| theme. In particular, using this theme will remove all background colors for blocks.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{orchid}
-  This theme installs white-on-dark block titles. The background of
-  the title of a normal block is set to the foreground of the
-  structure color, the foreground is set to white. The background of
-  alerted blocks are set to red and of example blocks to green. The
-  body of blocks get a nearly transparent background.
+  This theme installs white-on-dark block titles. The background of the title of a normal block is set to the foreground of the structure color, the foreground is set to white. The background of alerted blocks are set to red and of example blocks to green. The body of blocks get a nearly transparent background.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{rose}
-  This theme installs nearly transparent backgrounds for both block
-  titles and block bodies. This theme is much less ``aggressive'' than
-  the |orchid| theme. The background colors are derived from the
-  foreground of the structure \beamer-color.
+  This theme installs nearly transparent backgrounds for both block titles and block bodies. This theme is much less ``aggressive'' than the |orchid| theme. The background colors are derived from the foreground of the structure \beamer-color.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
-
 \subsubsection{Outer Color Themes}
 
-An outer color theme changes the palette colors, on which the colors
-used in the headline, footline, and sidebar
-are based by default. Outer color themes normally do not change the
-color of inner elements, except possibly for |titlelike|. They have
-happen to be sea-animal names.
+An outer color theme changes the palette colors, on which the colors used in the headline, footline, and sidebar are based by default. Outer color themes normally do not change the color of inner elements, except possibly for |titlelike|. They have happen to be sea-animal names.
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{whale}
-  Installs a white-on-dark palette for the headline, footline, and
-  sidebar. The backgrounds used there are set to shades between the
-  structure \beamer-color and black. The foreground is set to
-  white.
+  Installs a white-on-dark palette for the headline, footline, and sidebar. The backgrounds used there are set to shades between the structure \beamer-color and black. The foreground is set to white.
 
-  While this color theme can appear to be aggressive, you should note
-  that a dark bar at the border of a frame will have a somewhat
-  different appearance during a presentation than it has on paper:
-  During a presentation the projection on the
-  wall is usually surrounded by blackness. Thus, a dark bar will
-  not create a contrast as opposed to the way it does on
-  paper. Indeed, using this theme will cause the main part of the
-  frame to be more at the focus of attention.
+  While this color theme can appear to be aggressive, you should note that a dark bar at the border of a frame will have a somewhat different appearance during a presentation than it has on paper: During a presentation the projection on the wall is usually surrounded by blackness. Thus, a dark bar will not create a contrast as opposed to the way it does on paper. Indeed, using this theme will cause the main part of the frame to be more at the focus of attention.
 
-  The counterpart to the theme with respect to blocks is the |orchid|
-  theme. However, pairing it with the |rose| color theme is also
-  interesting.
+  The counterpart to the theme with respect to blocks is the |orchid| theme. However, pairing it with the |rose| color theme is also interesting.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{seahorse}
-  Installs a near-transparent backgrounds for the headline, footline,
-  and sidebar. Using this theme will cause navigational elements to be
-  much less ``dominant'' than when using the |whale| theme (see the
-  discussion on contrast there, though).
+  Installs a near-transparent backgrounds for the headline, footline, and sidebar. Using this theme will cause navigational elements to be much less ``dominant'' than when using the |whale| theme (see the discussion on contrast there, though).
 
-  It goes well with the |rose| or the |lily| color theme. Pairing it
-  with the |orchid| overemphasizes blocks (in my opinion).
+  It goes well with the |rose| or the |lily| color theme. Pairing it with the |orchid| overemphasizes blocks (in my opinion).
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
-
 \begin{colorthemeexample}{dolphin}
-  A color theme somewhere in the middle between the whale and the
-  seahorse. It was graciously donated by Manuel Carro. Like the
-  seahorse, it goes well with the |rose| and the |lily| color theme.
+  A color theme somewhere in the middle between the whale and the seahorse. It was graciously donated by Manuel Carro. Like the seahorse, it goes well with the |rose| and the |lily| color theme.
 \end{colorthemeexample}
 
 
-
-
 \subsection{Changing the Colors Used for Different Elements of a Presentation}
 
 This section explains how \beamer's color management works.
 
-
-
 \subsubsection{Overview of Beamer's Color Management}
 
-In \beamer's philosophy, every element of a presentation can have a
-different color. Unfortunately, it turned out that simply assigning a
-single color to every element of a presentation is not such a good
-idea. First of all, we sometimes  want colors of elements to change
-during a presentation, like the color of the item indicators when they
-become alerted or inside an example block. Second, some elements
-naturally have two colors, namely a foreground and a background, but
-not always. Third, sometimes elements somehow should not have any
-special color but should simply ``run along'' with the color of their
-surrounding. Finally, giving a special color to every element makes it
-very hard to globally change colors (like changing all the different
-kind-of-blue things into kind-of-red things) and it makes later
-extensions even harder.
+In \beamer's philosophy, every element of a presentation can have a different color. Unfortunately, it turned out that simply assigning a single color to every element of a presentation is not such a good idea. First of all, we sometimes want colors of elements to change during a presentation, like the color of the item indicators when they become alerted or inside an example block. Second, some elements naturally have two colors, namely a foreground and a background, but not always. Third, sometimes elements somehow should not have any special color but should simply ``run along'' with the color of their surrounding. Finally, giving a special color to every element makes it very hard to globally change colors (like changing all the different kind-of-blue things into kind-of-red things) and it makes later extensions even harder.
 
-For all these reasons, the color of an element in \beamer\ is a
-structured object, which I call a \emph{\beamer-color}. Every
-\beamer-color has two parts: a foreground and a background. Either of
-these may be ``empty,'' which means that whatever foreground or
-background was active before should remain active when the color is
-used.
+For all these reasons, the color of an element in \beamer\ is a structured object, which I call a \emph{\beamer-color}. Every \beamer-color has two parts: a foreground and a background. Either of these may be ``empty,'' which means that whatever foreground or background was active before should remain active when the color is used.
 
-\beamer-colors can \emph{inherit} from other \beamer-colors and the
-default themes make extensive use of this feature. For example, there
-is a \beamer-color called |structure| and all sorts of elements
-inherit from this color. Thus, if someone changes |structure|, the
-color of all these elements automatically change accordingly. When a
-color inherits from another color, it can nevertheless still override
-only the foreground or the background.
+\beamer-colors can \emph{inherit} from other \beamer-colors and the default themes make extensive use of this feature. For example, there is a \beamer-color called |structure| and all sorts of elements inherit from this color. Thus, if someone changes |structure|, the color of all these elements automatically change accordingly. When a color inherits from another color, it can nevertheless still override only the foreground or the background.
 
-It is also possible to ``inherit'' from another \beamer-color in a more
-sophisticated way, which is more like \emph{using} the other
-\beamer-color in an indirect way. You can specify that, say, the
-background of the title should be a 90\% of the background of normal
-text and 10\% of the foreground of |structure|.
+It is also possible to ``inherit'' from another \beamer-color in a more sophisticated way, which is more like \emph{using} the other \beamer-color in an indirect way. You can specify that, say, the background of the title should be a 90\% of the background of normal text and 10\% of the foreground of |structure|.
 
-Inheritance and using of other \beamer-colors is done
-dynamically. This means that if one of the parent \beamer-colors
-changes during the presentation, the derived colors automatically also
-change.
+Inheritance and using of other \beamer-colors is done dynamically. This means that if one of the parent \beamer-colors changes during the presentation, the derived colors automatically also change.
 
-The default color theme, which is always loaded, installs numerous
-\beamer-colors and inheritance relations between them. These colors
-are explained throughout this guide. The color used for, say,
-frametitles is discussed in the section on frametitles, and so on.
-
+The default color theme, which is always loaded, installs numerous \beamer-colors and inheritance relations between them. These colors are explained throughout this guide. The color used for, say, frametitles is discussed in the section on frametitles, and so on.
 
 \subsubsection{Using Beamer's Colors}
 
-A \beamer-color is not a normal color as defined by the |color| and
-|xcolor| packages and, accordingly, cannot be used directly as in
-commands like |\color| or |\colorlet|. Instead, in order to use a
-\beamer-color, you should first call the command |\usebeamercolor|,
-which is explained below. This command will setup two (normal) colors
-called |fg| (for foreground) and |bg| (for, well, guess what). You can
-then say |\color{fg}| to install the foreground color and
-|\color{bg}| to install the background color. You can also use the
-colors |fg| and |bg| in any context in which you normally use a color
-like, say, |red|. If a \beamer-color does not have a foreground or a
-background, the colors |fg| or |bg| (or both) remain unchanged.
+A \beamer-color is not a normal color as defined by the |color| and |xcolor| packages and, accordingly, cannot be used directly as in commands like |\color| or |\colorlet|. Instead, in order to use a \beamer-color, you should first call the command |\usebeamercolor|, which is explained below. This command will setup two (normal) colors called |fg| (for foreground) and |bg| (for, well, guess what). You can then say |\color{fg}| to install the foreground color and |\color{bg}| to install the background color. You can also use the colors |fg| and |bg| in any context in which you normally use a color like, say, |red|. If a \beamer-color does not have a foreground or a background, the colors |fg| or |bg| (or both) remain unchanged.
 
-Inside templates, this command will typically have already been called
-for you with the option |[fg]|.
+Inside templates, this command will typically have already been called for you with the option |[fg]|.
 
-\begin{command}{\usebeamercolor\opt{|*|}\oarg{fg or
-      bg}\marg{beamer-color name}}
-  This command (possibly) changes the two colors |fg| and |bg| to the
-  foreground and background color of the \meta{beamer-color name}. If
-  the \beamer-color does not specify a foreground, |fg| is left
-  unchanged; if does not specify a background, |bg| is left
-  unchanged.
+\begin{command}{\usebeamercolor\opt{|*|}\oarg{fg or bg}\marg{beamer-color name}}
+  This command (possibly) changes the two colors |fg| and |bg| to the foreground and background color of the \meta{beamer-color name}. If the \beamer-color does not specify a foreground, |fg| is left unchanged; if does not specify a background, |bg| is left unchanged.
 
-  You will often wish to directly use the color |fg| or |bg| after
-  using this command. For this common situation, the optional argument
-  \meta{fg or bg} is useful, which may be either |fg| or
-  |bg|. Giving this option will cause the foreground |fg| or the
-  background |bg| to be immediately installed after they have been
-  setup. Thus, the following command
+  You will often wish to directly use the color |fg| or |bg| after using this command. For this common situation, the optional argument \meta{fg or bg} is useful, which may be either |fg| or |bg|. Giving this option will cause the foreground |fg| or the background |bg| to be immediately installed after they have been setup. Thus, the following command
 \begin{verbatim}
 \usebeamercolor[fg]{normal text}
 \end{verbatim}
 \usebeamercolor{normal text}
 \color{fg}
 \end{verbatim}
+  If you use the starred version of this command, the \beamer-color |normal text| is used before the command is invoked. This ensures that, barring evil trickery, the colors |fg| and |bg| will be setup independently of whatever colors happened to be in use when the command is invoked.
 
-  If you use the starred version of this command, the \beamer-color
-  |normal text| is used before the command is invoked. This ensures
-  that, barring evil trickery, the colors |fg| and |bg| will be setup
-  independently of whatever colors happened to be in use when the
-  command is invoked.
+  This command has special side-effects. First, the (normal) color |parent.bg| is set to the value of |bg| prior to this call. Thus you can access the color that was in use prior to the call of this command via the color |parent.bg|.
 
-  This command has special side-effects. First, the (normal) color
-  |parent.bg| is set to the value of |bg| prior to this call. Thus you
-  can access the color that was in use prior to the call of this
-  command via the color |parent.bg|.
+  Second, the special color \meta{beamer-color name}|.fg| is \emph{globally} set to the same value as |fg| and \meta{beamer-color name}|.bg| is globally set to the value of |bg|. This allows you to access the foreground or background of a certain \meta{beamer-color name} after another \beamer-color has been used. However, referring to these special global colors should be kept to the unavoidable minimum and should be done as locally as possible since a change of the \beamer-color will not reflect in a change of the colors \meta{beamer-color name}|.fg| and \meta{beamer-color name}|.bg| until the next invocation of |\usebeamercolor|. Also, if the \meta{beamer-color name} does not specify a foreground or a background color, then the values of the special colors are whatever happened to be the foreground or background at the time of the last invocation of |\usebeamercolor|.
 
-  Second, the special color \meta{beamer-color name}|.fg| is \emph{globally}
-  set to the same value as |fg| and \meta{beamer-color name}|.bg| is
-  globally set to the value of |bg|. This allows you to access the
-  foreground or background of a certain \meta{beamer-color name} after
-  another \beamer-color has been used. However, referring to these
-  special global colors should be kept to the unavoidable minimum and
-  should be done as locally as possible since a change of the
-  \beamer-color will not reflect in a change of the colors
-  \meta{beamer-color name}|.fg| and \meta{beamer-color name}|.bg|
-  until the next invocation of |\usebeamercolor|. Also, if the
-  \meta{beamer-color name} does not specify a foreground or a
-  background color, then the values of the special colors are whatever
-  happened to be the foreground or background at the time of the last
-  invocation of |\usebeamercolor|.
-
-  So, try not to get into the habit of writing |\color{structure.fg}|
-  all the time, at least not without a |\usebeamercolor{structure}|
-  close by.
+  So, try not to get into the habit of writing |\color{structure.fg}| all the time, at least not without a |\usebeamercolor{structure}| close by.
 
   \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \end{command}
 
 
-\begin{command}{\ifbeamercolorempty\oarg{fg or bg}\marg{beamer-color
-      name}\marg{if undefined}\marg{if defined}}
-  This command can be used to check whether the foreground or
-  background of some \meta{beamer-color name} is non-empty. If the
-  foreground or background of \meta{beamer-color name} is defined,
-  \meta{if defined} will be executed, otherwise the \meta{if undefined} code.
+\begin{command}{\ifbeamercolorempty\oarg{fg or bg}\marg{beamer-color name}\marg{if undefined}\marg{if defined}}
+  This command can be used to check whether the foreground or background of some \meta{beamer-color name} is non-empty. If the foreground or background of \meta{beamer-color name} is defined, \meta{if defined} will be executed, otherwise the \meta{if undefined} code.
 
   \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \end{verbatim}
 \end{command}
 
-
-
-
 \subsubsection{Setting Beamer's Colors}
 
-To set or to change a \beamer-color, you can use the command
-|\setbeamercolor|.
+To set or to change a \beamer-color, you can use the command |\setbeamercolor|.
 
 \begin{command}{\setbeamercolor\opt{|*|}\marg{beamer-color name}\marg{options}}
-  Sets or changes a \beamer-color. The \meta{beamer-color name} should
-  be a reasonably simple text (do not try too much trickery and avoid
-  punctuation symbols), but it may contain spaces. Thus, |normal text|
-  is a valid \meta{beamer-color name} and so is |My Color Number 2|.
+  Sets or changes a \beamer-color. The \meta{beamer-color name} should be a reasonably simple text (do not try too much trickery and avoid punctuation symbols), but it may contain spaces. Thus, |normal text| is a valid \meta{beamer-color name} and so is |My Color Number 2|.
 
-  In the most simple case, you just specify a foreground by giving the
-  |fg=| option and, possibly, also a background using the |bg=|
-  option.
+  In the most simple case, you just specify a foreground by giving the |fg=| option and, possibly, also a background using the |bg=| option.
 
   \example |\setbeamercolor{normal text}{fg=black,bg=mylightgrey}|
   \example |\setbeamercolor{alerted text}{fg=red!80!black}|
 
-  The effect of this command is accumulative, thus the following two
-  commands
+  The effect of this command is accumulative, thus the following two commands
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamercolor{section in toc}{fg=blue}
 \setbeamercolor{section in toc}{bg=white}
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamercolor{section in toc}{fg=blue,bg=white}
 \end{verbatim}
-  Naturally, a second call with the same kind of \meta{option} set to
-  a different value overrides a previous call.
+  Naturally, a second call with the same kind of \meta{option} set to a different value overrides a previous call.
 
-  The starred version first resets everything, thereby ``switching
-  off'' the accumulative effect. Use this starred version to
-  completely reset the definition of some \beamer-color.
+  The starred version first resets everything, thereby ``switching off'' the accumulative effect. Use this starred version to completely reset the definition of some \beamer-color.
 
   The following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item \declare{|fg=|\meta{color}} sets the foreground color of
-    \meta{beamer-color name} to the given (normal)   \meta{color}. The
-    \meta{color} may also be a color expression like |red!50!black|,
-    see the manual of the \textsc{xcolor} package. If \meta{color}
-    is empty, the \meta{beamer-color name} ``has no special
-    foreground'' and when the color is used, the foreground
-    currently in force should not be changed.
+    \item
+    \declare{|fg=|\meta{color}} sets the foreground color of \meta{beamer-color name} to the given (normal)   \meta{color}. The \meta{color} may also be a color expression like |red!50!black|, see the manual of the \textsc{xcolor} package. If \meta{color} is empty, the \meta{beamer-color name} ``has no special foreground'' and when the color is used, the foreground currently in force should not be changed.
 
-    Specifying a foreground this way will override any inherited
-    foreground color.
-  \item  \declare{|bg=|\meta{color}} does the same as the |fg|
-    option, but for the background.
-  \item \declare{|parent=|\meta{parent beamer-color(s)}} specifies
-    that \meta{beamer-color name} should inherit from the specified
-    \meta{parent beamer-color(s)}. Any foreground and/or background
-    color set by the parents will also be used when
-    \meta{beamer-color name} is used. If multiple parents specify
-    a foreground, the last one ``wins''; and likewise for the
-    backgrounds.
+    Specifying a foreground this way will override any inherited foreground color.
+    \item
+    \declare{|bg=|\meta{color}} does the same as the |fg| option, but for the background.
+    \item
+    \declare{|parent=|\meta{parent beamer-color(s)}} specifies that \meta{beamer-color name} should inherit from the specified \meta{parent beamer-color(s)}. Any foreground and/or background color set by the parents will also be used when \meta{beamer-color name} is used. If multiple parents specify a foreground, the last one ``wins''; and likewise for the backgrounds.
 
     \example
 \begin{verbatim}
   Now terrible blue on green text, since parent was changed.
 \end{beamercolorbox}
 \end{verbatim}
+    Note that a change of the foreground or background of a parent changes the corresponding foreground or background of the child (unless it is overruled).
 
-    Note that a change of the foreground or background of a parent
-    changes the corresponding foreground or background of the child
-    (unless it is overruled).
+    A \beamer-color cannot only have parents, but also grandparents and so on.
+    \item
+    \declare{|use=|\meta{another beamer-color}} is used to make sure that another \beamer-color is setup correctly before the foreground or background color specification are evaluated.
 
-    A \beamer-color cannot only have parents, but also grandparents
-    and so on.
-  \item \declare{|use=|\meta{another beamer-color}} is used to
-    make sure that another \beamer-color is setup correctly before the
-    foreground or background color specification are evaluated.
-
-    Suppose you wish the foreground of items to be a mixture
-    of 50\% of the foreground of structural elements and 50\% of the
-    normal foreground color. You could try
+    Suppose you wish the foreground of items to be a mixture of 50\% of the foreground of structural elements and 50\% of the normal foreground color. You could try
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamercolor{item}{fg=structure.fg!50!normal text.fg}
 \end{verbatim}
-    However, this will not necessarily give the desired result: If
-    the \beamer-color |structure| changes, the (normal) color
-    |structure.fg| is not immediately updated. In order to ensure
-    that the normal color |structure.fg| is correct, use the
-    following:
+    However, this will not necessarily give the desired result: If the \beamer-color |structure| changes, the (normal) color |structure.fg| is not immediately updated. In order to ensure that the normal color |structure.fg| is correct, use the following:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamercolor{item}{use={structure,normal text},fg=structure.fg!50!normal text.fg}
 \end{verbatim}
-    This will guarantee that the colors |structure.fg| and
-    |normal text.fg| are setup correctly when the foreground of
-    |item| is computed.
+    This will guarantee that the colors |structure.fg| and |normal text.fg| are setup correctly when the foreground of |item| is computed.
 
     To show the difference, consider the following example:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \end{command}
 
 
-
-
 \subsection{The Color of Mathematical Text}
 
-By default, mathematical text does not have any special color---it
-just inherits the ``surrounding'' color. Some people prefer
-mathematical text to have some special color. Though I do not
-recommend this (I think mathematical text should \emph{not} stand out
-amid the normal text), \beamer\ makes it (reasonably) easy to change
-the color of mathematical text. Simply change the following colors:
+By default, mathematical text does not have any special color---it just inherits the ``surrounding'' color. Some people prefer mathematical text to have some special color. Though I do not recommend this (I think mathematical text should \emph{not} stand out amid the normal text), \beamer\ makes it (reasonably) easy to change the color of mathematical text. Simply change the following colors:
 
 \begin{element}{math text}\no\yes\no
-  This color is the parent of |math text inlined| and
-  |math text displayed|. It is empty by default. See those colors for
-  details.
+  This color is the parent of |math text inlined| and |math text displayed|. It is empty by default. See those colors for details.
 \end{element}
 
 \begin{element}{math text inlined}\no\yes\no
   \colorparents{math text}
-  If the foreground of this color is set, inlined mathematical text is
-  typeset using this color. This is done via some |\everymath| hackery
-  and may not work in all cases. If not, you'll have to try to find a
-  way around the problem. The background is currently
-  ignored.
+  If the foreground of this color is set, inlined mathematical text is typeset using this color. This is done via some |\everymath| hackery and may not work in all cases. If not, you'll have to try to find a way around the problem. The background is currently ignored.
 \end{element}
 
 \begin{element}{math text displayed}\no\yes\no
   \colorparents{math text}
-  Like |math text inlined|, only for so-called ``displayed''
-  mathematical text. This is mathematical text between |\[| and |\]| or
-  between |$$| and |$$| or inside environments like |equation| or
-  |align|. The setup of this color is somewhat fragile, use at your
-  own risk. The background is currently
-  ignored.
+  Like |math text inlined|, only for so-called ``displayed'' mathematical text. This is mathematical text between |\[| and |\]| or between |$$| and |$$| or inside environments like |equation| or |align|. The setup of this color is somewhat fragile, use at your own risk. The background is currently ignored.
 \end{element}
 
 \begin{element}{normal text in math text}\no\yes\no
-  If the foreground of this color is set, normal text inside
-  mathematical text (which is introduced using the |\text| command)
-  will be typeset using this color. The background is currently
-  ignored.
+  If the foreground of this color is set, normal text inside mathematical text (which is introduced using the |\text| command) will be typeset using this color. The background is currently ignored.
 \end{element}
 
 
-
 \subsection{The Color Palettes}
 
-When one designs a color theme, one faces the following problem:
-Suppose we want the colors in the headline to gradually change from
-black to, say, blue. Whatever is at the very top of the headline
-should be black, what comes right below it should be dark blue, and at
-the bottom of the headline things should just be blue. Unfortunately,
-different outer themes will put different things at the top. One theme
-might put the author at the top, another theme might put the document
-title there. This makes it impossible to directly assign one of the
-three colors ``black'', ``dark blue,'' and ``blue'' to the different
-elements that are typically rendered in the headline. No matter how we
-assign them, things will look wrong for certain outer themes.
+When one designs a color theme, one faces the following problem: Suppose we want the colors in the headline to gradually change from black to, say, blue. Whatever is at the very top of the headline should be black, what comes right below it should be dark blue, and at the bottom of the headline things should just be blue. Unfortunately, different outer themes will put different things at the top. One theme might put the author at the top, another theme might put the document title there. This makes it impossible to directly assign one of the three colors ``black'', ``dark blue,'' and ``blue'' to the different elements that are typically rendered in the headline. No matter how we assign them, things will look wrong for certain outer themes.
 
-To circumvent this problem, \beamer\ uses a layer of \emph{palette
-colors}. Color themes typically only change these palette colors. For
-example, a color theme might make the \beamer-color |palette primary|
-blue, make |palette secondary| a dark blue, and make |palette tertiary|
-black. Outer themes can now setup things such that whatever they show
-at the top of the headline inherits from |palette primary|, what comes
-below inherits from |palette secondary|, and whatever is at the bottom
-inherits from |palette tertiary|. This way, color themes can change the
-way even complicated outer themes look and they can do so
-consistently.
+To circumvent this problem, \beamer\ uses a layer of \emph{palette colors}. Color themes typically only change these palette colors. For example, a color theme might make the \beamer-color |palette primary| blue, make |palette secondary| a dark blue, and make |palette tertiary| black. Outer themes can now setup things such that whatever they show at the top of the headline inherits from |palette primary|, what comes below inherits from |palette secondary|, and whatever is at the bottom inherits from |palette tertiary|. This way, color themes can change the way even complicated outer themes look and they can do so consistently.
 
-Note that the user can still change the color of every element
-individually, simply by overriding the color(s) of the elements in the
-headline. In a sense, the palette colors are just a ``suggestion'' how
-things should be colored by an outer theme.
+Note that the user can still change the color of every element individually, simply by overriding the color(s) of the elements in the headline. In a sense, the palette colors are just a ``suggestion'' how things should be colored by an outer theme.
 
 In detail, the following palette colors are used by outer themes.
 
+\begin{element}{palette primary}\no\yes\no
+  Outer themes (should) base the color of navigational elements and, possibly, also of other elements, on the four palette colors. The ``primary'' palette should be used for the most important navigational elements, which are usually the ones that change most often and hence require the most attention by the audience. The ``secondary'' and ``tertiary'' are less important, the ``quaternary'' one is least important.
 
-\begin{element}{palette primary}\no\yes\no
-  Outer themes (should) base the color of navigational elements and,
-  possibly, also of other elements, on the four palette colors. The
-  ``primary'' palette should be used for the most important
-  navigational elements, which are usually the ones that change most
-  often and hence require the most attention by the audience. The
-  ``secondary'' and ``tertiary'' are less important, the ``quaternary'' one
-  is least important.
+  By default, the palette colors do not have a background and the foreground ranges from |structure.fg| to |black|.
 
-  By default, the palette colors do not have a background and the
-  foreground ranges from |structure.fg| to |black|.
-
-  For the sidebar, there is an extra set of palette colors, see
-  |palette sidebar primary|.
+  For the sidebar, there is an extra set of palette colors, see |palette sidebar primary|.
 \end{element}
 
 \begin{element}{palette secondary}\no\yes\no
 \end{element}
 
 \begin{element}{palette sidebar primary}\no\yes\no
-  Similar to |palette primary|, only outer themes (should) base the
-  colors of elements in the sidebar on the four sidebar palette
-  colors.
+  Similar to |palette primary|, only outer themes (should) base the colors of elements in the sidebar on the four sidebar palette colors.
 \end{element}
 
 \begin{element}{palette sidebar secondary}\no\yes\no
 \end{element}
 
 
+\subsection{Miscellaneous Colors}
 
-\subsection{Miscellaneous  Colors}
-
-In this section some ``basic'' colors are listed that do not
-``belong'' to any special commands.
+In this section some ``basic'' colors are listed that do not ``belong'' to any special commands.
 
 \begin{element}{normal text}\no\yes\yes
-  The color is used for normal text. At the beginning of
-  the document the foreground color is installed as
-  |\normalcolor|. The background of this color is used by the
-  default background canvas for the background of the
-  presentation, see Section~\ref{section-canvas}. The background is
-  also the default value of the normal color |bg|.
+  The color is used for normal text. At the beginning of the document the foreground color is installed as |\normalcolor|. The background of this color is used by the default background canvas for the background of the presentation, see Section~\ref{section-canvas}. The background is also the default value of the normal color |bg|.
 
-  Since the color is the ``root'' of all other \beamer-colors, both a
-  foreground and a background must be installed. In particular, to get
-  a transparent background canvas, make the background of the
-  \beamer-color |background canvas| empty, not the background of this
-  color.
+  Since the color is the ``root'' of all other \beamer-colors, both a foreground and a background must be installed. In particular, to get a transparent background canvas, make the background of the \beamer-color |background canvas| empty, not the background of this color.
 
-  The \beamer-font currently is not used. In particular, redefining this
-  font will not have any effect. This is likely to change in the future.
+  The \beamer-font currently is not used. In particular, redefining this font will not have any effect. This is likely to change in the future.
 \end{element}
 
 \begin{element}{example text}\no\yes\yes
-  The color/font is used when text is typeset inside an |example|
-  block.
+  The color/font is used when text is typeset inside an |example| block.
 \end{element}
 
 \begin{element}{titlelike}\no\yes\yes
-  This color/font is a more specialized form of the |structure|
-  color/font. It is the base for all elements that are ``like
-  titles.'' This includes the frame title and subtitle as well as the
-  document title and subtitle.
+  This color/font is a more specialized form of the |structure| color/font. It is the base for all elements that are ``like titles.'' This includes the frame title and subtitle as well as the document title and subtitle.
 \end{element}
 
 \begin{element}{separation line}\no\yes\no
-  The foreground of this color is used for separating lines. If the
-  foreground is empty, no separation line is drawn.
+  The foreground of this color is used for separating lines. If the foreground is empty, no separation line is drawn.
 \end{element}
 
 \begin{element}{upper separation line head}\no\yes\no
 \end{element}
 
 
-
-
 \subsection{Transparency Effects}
 \label{section-transparent}
 
-By default, \emph{covered} items are not shown during a
-presentation. Thus if you write |\uncover<2>{Text.}|, the text
-is not shown on any but the second slide. On the other slides, the text
-is not simply printed using the background color -- it is not shown at
-all. This effect is most useful if your background does not have a
-uniform color.
+By default, \emph{covered} items are not shown during a presentation. Thus if you write |\uncover<2>{Text.}|, the text is not shown on any but the second slide. On the other slides, the text is not simply printed using the background color -- it is not shown at all. This effect is most useful if your background does not have a uniform color.
 
-Sometimes however, you might prefer that covered items are not
-completely covered. Rather, you would like them to be shown already in
-a very dim or shaded way. This allows your audience to get a feeling
-for what is yet to come, without getting distracted by it. Also, you
-might wish text that is covered ``once more'' still to be visible to
-some degree.
+Sometimes however, you might prefer that covered items are not completely covered. Rather, you would like them to be shown already in a very dim or shaded way. This allows your audience to get a feeling for what is yet to come, without getting distracted by it. Also, you might wish text that is covered ``once more'' still to be visible to some degree.
 
-Ideally, there would be an option to make covered text
-``transparent.'' This would mean that when covered text is shown, it
-would instead be mixed with the background behind it. Unfortunately,
-|pgf| does not support real transparency yet. Instead, transparency is
-created by mixing the color of the object you want to show with the
-current background color (the color |bg|, which has hopefully been
-setup such that it is the average color of the background on which the
-object should be placed). To install this effect, you can use:
+Ideally, there would be an option to make covered text ``transparent.'' This would mean that when covered text is shown, it would instead be mixed with the background behind it. Unfortunately, |pgf| does not support real transparency yet. Instead, transparency is created by mixing the color of the object you want to show with the current background color (the color |bg|, which has hopefully been setup such that it is the average color of the background on which the object should be placed). To install this effect, you can use:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamercovered{transparent}
 \end{verbatim}
-This command allows you to specify in a quite general way how a
-covered item should be rendered. You can even specify different ways
-of rendering the item depending on how long it will take before this
-item is shown or for how long it has already been covered once
-more. The transparency effect will automatically apply to all colors,
-\emph{except} for the colors in images. For images there is a
-workaround, see the documentation of the \pgfname\ package.
+This command allows you to specify in a quite general way how a covered item should be rendered. You can even specify different ways of rendering the item depending on how long it will take before this item is shown or for how long it has already been covered once more. The transparency effect will automatically apply to all colors, \emph{except} for the colors in images. For images there is a workaround, see the documentation of the \pgfname\ package.
 
 \begin{command}{\setbeamercovered\marg{options}}
-  This command offers several different options, the most important of
-  which is |transparent|. All options are internally mapped to the two
-  options |still covered| and |again covered|.
+  This command offers several different options, the most important of which is |transparent|. All options are internally mapped to the two options |still covered| and |again covered|.
 
   In detail, the following \meta{options} may be given:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item \declare{|invisible|} is the default and causes covered text
-    to ``completely disappear''.
-  \item \declare{|transparent|}\opt{|=|\meta{opaqueness}} causes
-    covered text to be typset in a ``transparent'' way. By default,
-    this means that 85\% of the background color is mixed into all
-    colors or that the \meta{opaqueness} of the text is 15\%. You can
-    specify a different \meta{percentage}, where |0| means ``totally
-    transparent'' and |100| means ``totally opaque.''
+    \item
+    \declare{|invisible|} is the default and causes covered text to ``completely disappear''.
+    \item
+    \declare{|transparent|}\opt{|=|\meta{opaqueness}} causes covered text to be typset in a ``transparent'' way. By default, this means that 85\% of the background color is mixed into all colors or that the \meta{opaqueness} of the text is 15\%. You can specify a different \meta{percentage}, where |0| means ``totally transparent'' and |100| means ``totally opaque.''
 
-    Unfortunately, this value is kind of ``specific'' to every
-    projector. What looks good on your screen need not look good
-    during a presentation.
-  \item \declare{|dynamic|} Makes all covered text quite transparent,
-    but in a dynamic way. The longer it will take till the text is
-    uncovered, the stronger the transparency.
-  \item \declare{|highly dynamic|} Has the same effect as |dynamic|,
-    but the effect is stronger.
-  \item \declare{|still covered=|\meta{not yet list}} specifies  how
-    to render covered items that have not yet been uncovered. The
-    \meta{not yet list} should be a list of |\opaqueness| commands,
-    see the description of that command, below.
+    Unfortunately, this value is kind of ``specific'' to every projector. What looks good on your screen need not look good during a presentation.
+    \item
+    \declare{|dynamic|} Makes all covered text quite transparent, but in a dynamic way. The longer it will take till the text is uncovered, the stronger the transparency.
+    \item
+    \declare{|highly dynamic|} Has the same effect as |dynamic|, but the effect is stronger.
+    \item
+    \declare{|still covered=|\meta{not yet list}} specifies how to render covered items that have not yet been uncovered. The \meta{not yet list} should be a list of |\opaqueness| commands, see the description of that command, below.
     \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamercovered{%
   still covered={\opaqueness<1>{15}\opaqueness<2>{10}\opaqueness<3>{5}\opaqueness<4->{2}},
   again covered={\opaqueness<1->{15}}}
 \end{verbatim}
-  \item \declare{|again covered=|\meta{once more list}} specifies how
-    to render covered items that have once more been covered, that is,
-    that had been shown before but are now covered again.
+    \item
+    \declare{|again covered=|\meta{once more list}} specifies how to render covered items that have once more been covered, that is, that had been shown before but are now covered again.
   \end{itemize}
 \end{command}
 
-\begin{command}{\opaqueness\ssarg{overlay
-      specification}\marg{percentage of opaqueness}}
-  The \meta{overlay specification} specifies on which slides covered
-  text should have which \meta{percentage of opaqueness}. Unlike
-  other overlay specifications, this \meta{overlay specification} is a
-  ``relative'' overlay specification. For example, the specification
-  ``3'' here means ``things that will be uncovered three slides
-  ahead,'' respectively ``things that have once more been covered for
-  three slides.'' More precisely, if an item is uncovered for more
-  than one slide and then covered once more, only the ``first moment
-  of uncovering'' is used for the calculation of how long the item has
-  been covered once more.
+\begin{command}{\opaqueness\ssarg{overlay specification}\marg{percentage of opaqueness}}
+  The \meta{overlay specification} specifies on which slides covered text should have which \meta{percentage of opaqueness}. Unlike other overlay specifications, this \meta{overlay specification} is a ``relative'' overlay specification. For example, the specification ``3'' here means ``things that will be uncovered three slides ahead,'' respectively ``things that have once more been covered for three slides.'' More precisely, if an item is uncovered for more than one slide and then covered once more, only the ``first moment of uncovering'' is used for the calculation of how long the item has been covered once more.
 
-  An opaqueness of 100 is fully opaque and 0 is fully
-  transparent. Currently, since real transparency is not yet
-  implemented, this command causes all colors to get a mixing of
-  \meta{percentage of opaqueness} of the current
-  |bg|. At some future point this command might result in real
-  transparency.
+  An opaqueness of 100 is fully opaque and 0 is fully transparent. Currently, since real transparency is not yet implemented, this command causes all colors to get a mixing of \meta{percentage of opaqueness} of the current |bg|. At some future point this command might result in real transparency.
 
-  The alternate \pgfname\ extension used inside an opaque area is
-  \meta{percentage of opaqueness}|opaque|. In case of nested calls,
-  only the innermost opaqueness specification is used.
+  The alternate \pgfname\ extension used inside an opaque area is \meta{percentage of opaqueness}|opaque|. In case of nested calls, only the innermost opaqueness specification is used.
   \example
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamercovered{still covered={\opaqueness<1->{15}},again covered={\opaqueness<1->{15}}}
 \pgfdeclareimage{book}{book}
 \pgfdeclareimage{book.!15opaque}{filenameforbooknearlytransparent}
 \end{verbatim}
-  Makes everything that is uncovered in two slides only 15 percent
-  opaque.
+  Makes everything that is uncovered in two slides only 15 percent opaque.
 \end{command}
-
-
-
-
-

doc/beamerug-compatibility.tex

     Same as the option |ucs|, but also sets the input encoding to |utf8x|. You could also use the option |ucs| and say |\usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc}| in the preamble. This also automatically loads |ucs| package in most \TeX\ systems.
   \end{classoption}
 
-  If you use a Unicode character outside the first two code pages (which includes the Latin alphabet and the extended Latin alphabet) in a section or subsection heading, you have to use the command |\PreloadUnicodePage{|\meta{code  page}|}| to give |ucs| a chance to preload these code pages. You will know that a character has not been preloaded, if you get a message like ``Please insert into preamble.'' The code page of a character is given by the unicode number of the character divided by 256.
+  If you use a Unicode character outside the first two code pages (which includes the Latin alphabet and the extended Latin alphabet) in a section or subsection heading, you have to use the command |\PreloadUnicodePage{|\meta{code page}|}| to give |ucs| a chance to preload these code pages. You will know that a character has not been preloaded, if you get a message like ``Please insert into preamble.'' The code page of a character is given by the unicode number of the character divided by 256.
 
   \begin{classoption}{utf8}
     This option sets the input encoding to |utf8|. It's designed to be used \emph{without} |ucs|. It's the same as saying |\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}| in the preamble.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{musixtex}}
-  When using  MusiX\TeX\ to typeset musical scores, your document must be compiled with |pdfelatex| or |elatex| instead of |pdflatex| or |latex|.
+  When using MusiX\TeX\ to typeset musical scores, your document must be compiled with |pdfelatex| or |elatex| instead of |pdflatex| or |latex|.
 
-  Inside a |music| environment, the |\pause| is redefined to match MusiX\TeX's definition (a rest during one quarter of a whole). You can use the |\beamerpause| command  to create overlays in this environment.
+  Inside a |music| environment, the |\pause| is redefined to match MusiX\TeX's definition (a rest during one quarter of a whole). You can use the |\beamerpause| command to create overlays in this environment.
 \end{package}
 
 \begin{package}{{pdfpages}}
   See |\usepackage[utf8,utf8x]{inputenc}|.
 \end{package}
 
-
 \begin{package}{{xcolor}}
   \beamernote
   The |xcolor| package is automatically loaded by |beamer.cls|. The same applies as to |color|.

doc/beamerug-elements.tex

 % $Header$
 
 \section{Inner Themes, Outer Themes, and Templates}
-
 \label{section-elements}
 
-This section discusses the inner and outer themes that are
-available in \beamer. These themes install certain \emph{templates}
-for the different elements of a presentation. The template mechanism is
-explained at the end of the section.
+This section discusses the inner and outer themes that are available in \beamer. These themes install certain \emph{templates} for the different elements of a presentation. The template mechanism is explained at the end of the section.
 
-Before we plunge into the details, let us agree on some terminology
-for this section. In \beamer, an \emph{element} is part of a
-presentation that is potentially typeset in some special way. Examples
-of elements are frame titles, the author's name, or the footnote
-sign. The appearance of every element is governed by a \emph{template}
-for this element. Appropriate templates are installed by inner and
-outer themes, where the \emph{inner} themes only install templates for
-elements that are typically ``inside the main text,'' while \emph{outer}
-themes install templates for elements ``around the main text.'' Thus,
-from the templates's point of view, there is no real difference
-between inner and outer themes.
-
+Before we plunge into the details, let us agree on some terminology for this section. In \beamer, an \emph{element} is part of a presentation that is potentially typeset in some special way. Examples of elements are frame titles, the author's name, or the footnote sign. The appearance of every element is governed by a \emph{template} for this element. Appropriate templates are installed by inner and outer themes, where the \emph{inner} themes only install templates for elements that are typically ``inside the main text,'' while \emph{outer} themes install templates for elements ``around the main text.'' Thus, from the templates's point of view, there is no real difference between inner and outer themes.
 
 
 \subsection{Inner Themes}
 
-An inner theme installs templates that dictate how the following
-elements are typeset:
+An inner theme installs templates that dictate how the following elements are typeset:
 \begin{itemize}
-\item Title and part pages.
-\item Itemize environments.
-\item Enumerate environments.
-\item Description environments.
-\item Block environments.
-\item Theorem and proof environments.
-\item Figures and tables.
-\item Footnotes.
-\item Bibliography entries.
+  \item Title and part pages.
+  \item Itemize environments.
+  \item Enumerate environments.
+  \item Description environments.
+  \item Block environments.
+  \item Theorem and proof environments.
+  \item Figures and tables.
+  \item Footnotes.
+  \item Bibliography entries.
 \end{itemize}
 
-
-In the following examples, the color themes |seahorse| and |rose| are
-used to show where and how background colors are
-honoured. Furthermore, background colors have been specified for all
-elements that honour them in the default theme. In the default color
-theme, all of the large rectangular areas are transparent.
+In the following examples, the color themes |seahorse| and |rose| are used to show where and how background colors are honoured. Furthermore, background colors have been specified for all elements that honour them in the default theme. In the default color theme, all of the large rectangular areas are transparent.
 
 \begin{innerthemeexample}{default}
-  The default element theme is quite sober. The only extravagance is
-  the fact that a little triangle is used in |itemize| environments
-  instead of the usual dot.
+  The default element theme is quite sober. The only extravagance is the fact that a little triangle is used in |itemize| environments instead of the usual dot.
 
-  In some cases the theme will honour background color specifications
-  for elements. For example, if you set the background color for block
-  titles to green, block titles will have a green background. The
-  background specifications are currently honoured for the following
-  elements:
+  In some cases the theme will honour background color specifications for elements. For example, if you set the background color for block titles to green, block titles will have a green background. The background specifications are currently honoured for the following elements:
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item Title, author, institute, and date fields in the title
-    page.
-  \item Block environments, both for the title and for the body.
+    \item Title, author, institute, and date fields in the title page.
+    \item Block environments, both for the title and for the body.
   \end{itemize}
   This list may increase in the future.
 \end{innerthemeexample}
 
 \begin{innerthemeexample}{circles}
-  In this theme, |itemize| and |enumerate| items start with a small
-  circle. Likewise, entries in the table of contents start with
-  circles.
+  In this theme, |itemize| and |enumerate| items start with a small circle. Likewise, entries in the table of contents start with circles.
 \end{innerthemeexample}
 
 \begin{innerthemeexample}{rectangles}
-  In this theme, |itemize| and |enumerate| items and table of contents
-  entries  start with small rectangles.
+  In this theme, |itemize| and |enumerate| items and table of contents entries start with small rectangles.
 \end{innerthemeexample}
 
 \begin{innerthemeexample}[\oarg{options}]{rounded}
-  In this theme, |itemize| and |enumerate| items and table of contents
-  entries start with small balls. If a background is specified for
-  blocks, then the corners of the background rectangles will be
-  rounded off. The following \meta{options} may be given:
+  In this theme, |itemize| and |enumerate| items and table of contents entries start with small balls. If a background is specified for blocks, then the corners of the background rectangles will be rounded off. The following \meta{options} may be given:
 
   \begin{itemize}
-  \item \declare{|shadow|} adds a shadow to all blocks.
+    \item \declare{|shadow|} adds a shadow to all blocks.
   \end{itemize}
 \end{innerthemeexample}
 
 \begin{innerthemeexample}{inmargin}
-  The idea behind this theme is to have ``structuring'' information on