Commits

Anonymous committed d081aaa

worked on documentation

  • Participants
  • Parent commits 89b2b25

Comments (0)

Files changed (4)

 \renewoverlaycommand{\color}{\original{\color}}{\gobbleoptional}
 \newoverlayenvironment{uncoverenv}{}{}{\pgfsys@begininvisible}{\pgfsys@endinvisible}
 \newoverlayenvironment{onlyenv}{}{}{\begingroup\setbox0=\hbox\bgroup}{\egroup\endgroup}
+\renewoverlaycommand{\hypertarget}{\original{\hypertarget}}{\gobble}
 
 \newoverlaycommand{\emph}{\@emph}{}
-\def\@emph#1{{\slshape#1}}
+\def\@emph#1{{\itshape#1}}
 
 
 

File doc/beamerexample.pdf

Binary file modified.

File doc/beameruserguide.pdf

Binary file modified.

File doc/beameruserguide.tex

 slide, a slide showing only the first of the three items, a slide
 showing the first two of them, and a slide showing all three items.
  
-To structurize your text, you can use the commands \verb!\section! and
+To structure your text, you can use the commands \verb!\section! and
 \verb!\subsection!. These commands will not only create a table of
 contents, but will also create navigation bars.
 
 }
 \end{verbatim}
 
+\Command{hypertarget}
+\Parameters{
+\item a target name
+\item some text
+}
+\Description{
+  If an overlay specification is present, the text is the specified
+  target for hyperjumps only on the specified slide. On all other
+  slides, the text is shown normally. Note that you \emph{must} add an
+  overlay specification to the \texttt{hypertarget} command whenever
+  you use it on frames that have multiple slides (otherwise
+  \texttt{pdflatex} rightfully complains that you have defined the
+  same target on different slides).}
+\Example
+\begin{verbatim}
+\frame{
+\begin{itemize}
+\item<1-> First item.
+\item<2-> Second item.
+\item<3-> Third item.
+\end{itemize}
+
+\hyperlink{jumptoend}{Jump to last slide of the frame.}
+\hypertarget<3>{jumptoend}{}
+}
+\end{verbatim}
+
 
 \subsection{Environments with Overlay Specifications}
 
 
 
 
-\section{Structurizing the Text}
-
-\subsection{Lists}
-
-There are three predefined environments for creating lists, namely
-\verb!enumerate!, \verb!itemize!, and \verb!description!. The first
-two of there can be nested to depth two, but not further (this would
-create totally unreadable slides).
-
-The \verb!\item! command is overlay-specification-aware. If an overlay
-specification is provided, the item will only be shown on the
-specified slides, see the following example. If the \verb!\item!
-command is to take an optional argument and an overlay specification,
-the overlay specification comes first as in \verb!\item<1>[Cat]!.
-
-\begin{verbatim}
-\frame
-{
-  There are three important points:
-  \begin{enumerate}
-  \item<1-> A first one,
-  \item<2-> a second one with a bunch of subpoints,
-    \begin{itemize}
-    \item first subpoint. (Only shown from second slide on!).
-    \item<3-> second subpoint added on third slide.
-    \item<4-> third subpoint added on fourth slide.
-    \end{itemize}
-  \item<5-> and a third one.
-  \end{enumerate}
-}
-\end{verbatim}
-
-
-\Environment{itemize}
-\Description{
-  Used to display a list of items that do not have a special
-  ordering. Inside the environment, use an \texttt{item} command for
-  each topic. The appearence of the items can be changed using
-  templates, see Section~\ref{section-templates}.}
-\Example
-\begin{verbatim}
-\begin{itemize}
-\item This is important.
-\item This is also important.
-\end{itemize}
-\end{verbatim}
-
-
-\Environment{enumerate}
-\Description{
-  Used to display an ordered list of items. Inside the environment,
-  use an \texttt{item} command for each topic. The appearence of the
-  items can be changed using templates, see
-  Section~\ref{section-templates}.}
-\Example
-\begin{verbatim}
-\begin{enumerate}
-\item This is important.
-\item This is also important.
-\end{enumerate}
-\end{verbatim}
-
-
-\Environment{description}
-\Parameters{
-\item
-  Some text, given as an optional parameter in square brackets. The
-  width of the labels will be set to the width of this text. Normally,
-  you choose the widest label in the description and copy it here.
-  }
-\Description{
-  Used to display an list that explains or defines labels. Inside the
-  environment, use an \texttt{item} with an argument in square brackets
-  for each topic. The appearence of the items can be changed using
-  templates, see Section~\ref{section-templates}.}
-\Example
-\begin{verbatim}
-\begin{description}
-\item[Lion] King of the savanna.
-\item[Tiger] King of the jungle.
-\end{description}
-
-\begin{description}[longest label]
-\item<1->[short] Some text.
-\item<2->[longest label] Some text.
-\item<3->[long label] Some text.
-\end{description}
-\end{verbatim}
-
-
-
-\subsection{Sections and Subsections}
-
-You can structurize your text using the commands \verb!\section! and
-\verb!\subsection!. Unlike standard \LaTeX, these commands will not
-create a heading at the position where you use them. Rather, they will
-add an entry to the table of contents and also to the navigation
-bars.
-
-In order to create a line break in the table of contents (usually not
-a good idea), you can use the command \verb!\breakhere!. Note that the
-standard command \verb!\\! does not work.
-
-\Command{section}
-\Parameters{
-\item (optional, in square brackets) text to be shown in horizontal
-  navigation bars 
-\item text to be shown in the table of contents; if empty, no entry is
-  created.
-}
-\Description{
-  Starts a section. No heading is created, the section name is only
-  shown in the table of contents and in the navigation bar. If the
-  main parameter is empty, but the parameter in square brackets is
-  not, a navigation entry is created, but no entry in the table of
-  contents. This is useful for sections like a ``table of contents
-  section.''} 
-\Example\verb!\section[Summary]{Summary of Main Results}! or
-\verb!\section[Outline]{}! 
-
-
-\Command{subsection}
-\Parameters{
-\item (optional, in square brackets) text to be shown in horizontal
-  navigation bars 
-\item text to be shown in the table of contents; if empty, no entry is
-  created.
-}
-\Description{
-  Starts a subsection. No heading is created, the subsection name is only
-  shown in the table of contents and in the navigation bar. If the
-  main parameter is empty, but the parameter in square brackets is
-  not, a navigation entry is created, but no entry in the table of
-  contents.}
-\Example\verb!\subsection{Some Subsection}!
-
-
-
-\subsection{Table of Contents}
-
-The two commands for creating a table of contents are
-\verb!\tableofcontents! and \verb!\tableofcontentscurrent!. The
-difference between these commands is small: the first inserts the main
-table of contents into the current frame, the second inserts a table
-of contents in which only the current section is highlighted. An
-example usage is given in the following example:
-
-\begin{verbatim}
-\section[Outline]{}
-\frame{\tableofcontents}
-
-\section{Introduction}
-\frame{\tableofcontentscurrent}
-\subsection{Why?}
-\frame{...}
-\frame{...}
-\subsection{Where?}
-\frame{...}
-
-\section{Results}
-\frame{\tableofcontentscurrent}
-\subsection{Because}
-\frame{...}
-\subsection{Here}
-\frame{...}
-\end{verbatim}
-
-
-
-\subsection{Title Page}
+\section{Structuring a Presentation}
+
+\subsection{Kinds of Global Structures of Presentations}
+
+\subsubsection{Linear Global Structure}
+
+%\subsubsection{Pyramidal Global Structures}
+
+\subsubsection{Nonlinear Global Structure}
+
+
+
+\subsection{Commands and Environments for Creating Global Structure}
+
+\subsubsection{Title Page}
 
 You can use the \verb!\titlepage! command to insert a title page into
 a frame. 
 
 
 
-\subsection{Columns}
-
-Three environments are used to create columns on a slide. Columns are
-especially useful for placing a graphic next to a description/explanation.
-The main environment for creating columns is called
-\verb!columns!. Inside this environment, you can place several
-\verb!column! environments. Each will create a new column.
-
-\Environment{columns}
-\Description{
-  A multi-column area. Inside the environment you should place only
-  \texttt{column} environments.}
-\Example
+\subsubsection{Table of Contents}
+
+The two commands for creating a table of contents are
+\verb!\tableofcontents! and \verb!\tableofcontentscurrent!. The
+difference between these commands is small: the first inserts the main
+table of contents into the current frame, the second inserts a table
+of contents in which only the current section is highlighted. An
+example usage is given in the following example:
+
 \begin{verbatim}
-\begin{columns}
-  \begin{column}{5cm}
-    First column.
-  \end{column}
-  \begin{column}{5cm}
-    Second column.
-  \end{column}
-\end{columns}
+\section[Outline]{}
+\frame{\tableofcontents}
+
+\section{Introduction}
+\frame{\tableofcontentscurrent}
+\subsection{Why?}
+\frame{...}
+\frame{...}
+\subsection{Where?}
+\frame{...}
+
+\section{Results}
+\frame{\tableofcontentscurrent}
+\subsection{Because}
+\frame{...}
+\subsection{Here}
+\frame{...}
 \end{verbatim}
 
-\Environment{columnsonlytextwidth}
-\Description{
-  This command has the same effect as \texttt{columns}, except that the
-  columns will not occupy the whole page width, but only the text
-  width. 
-  }
-
-\Environment{column}
+
+
+
+
+\subsubsection{Sections and Subsections}
+
+You can structure your text using the commands \verb!\section! and
+\verb!\subsection!. Unlike standard \LaTeX, these commands will not
+create a heading at the position where you use them. Rather, they will
+add an entry to the table of contents and also to the navigation
+bars.
+
+In order to create a line break in the table of contents (usually not
+a good idea), you can use the command \verb!\breakhere!. Note that the
+standard command \verb!\\! does not work.
+
+\Command{section}
 \Parameters{
-\item The width of the column.
+\item (optional, in square brackets) text to be shown in horizontal
+  navigation bars 
+\item text to be shown in the table of contents; if empty, no entry is
+  created.
 }
 \Description{
-  Creates a single column of the specified width. The column is
-  centered vertically relative to the other columns.}
-
-
-
-
-\subsection{Bibliography}
+  Starts a section. No heading is created, the section name is only
+  shown in the table of contents and in the navigation bar. If the
+  main parameter is empty, but the parameter in square brackets is
+  not, a navigation entry is created, but no entry in the table of
+  contents. This is useful for sections like a ``table of contents
+  section.''} 
+\Example\verb!\section[Summary]{Summary of Main Results}! or
+\verb!\section[Outline]{}! 
+
+
+\Command{subsection}
+\Parameters{
+\item (optional, in square brackets) text to be shown in horizontal
+  navigation bars 
+\item text to be shown in the table of contents; if empty, no entry is
+  created.
+}
+\Description{
+  Starts a subsection. No heading is created, the subsection name is only
+  shown in the table of contents and in the navigation bar. If the
+  main parameter is empty, but the parameter in square brackets is
+  not, a navigation entry is created, but no entry in the table of
+  contents.}
+\Example\verb!\subsection{Some Subsection}!
+
+
+
+
+\subsubsection{Bibliography}
 
 You can use the bibliography environment and the \verb!\cite! commands
 of \LaTeX\ in a \beamer\ presentation. However, there are a few things
 
 
 
-\subsection{Predefined Environments and Commands}
+\subsection{Using the Navigation Bars}
+
+Most themes that come along with the \beamer\ class show some kind of
+navigation bar during your talk. Although these navigation bars take
+up quite a bit of space, they are often useful for two reasons:
+
+\begin{itemize}
+\item
+  They provide the audience with a visual feedback of how much of your
+  talk you have covered and what is yet to come. Without such
+  feedback, an audience will often puzzle whether something you are
+  currently introducing will be explained in more detail later on or
+  not.
+\item
+  You can click on all parts of the navigation bar. This will directly
+  ``jump'' you to the part you have clicked on. This is particularly
+  useful to skip certain parts of your talk and during a ``question
+  session,'' when you wish to jump back to a particular frame someone
+  has asked about.
+\end{itemize}
+
+When you click on one of the icons representing a frame (by default
+this is icon is a small circle), the following happens:
+\begin{itemize}
+\item
+  If you click on (the icon of) any frame other than the current frame, the
+  presentation will jump to the first slide of the frame you clicked
+  on.
+\item
+  If you click on the current frame and you are not on the last slide
+  of this frame, you will jump to the last slide of the frame.
+\item
+  If you click on the current frame and you are on the last slide, you
+  will jump to the first slide of the frame.
+\item
+  If you click on the document title, you will jump to the first slide
+  (usually the title page).
+\end{itemize}
+By the above rules you can:
+\begin{itemize}
+\item
+  Jump to the beginning of a frame from somewhere else by clicking on
+  it once.  
+\item
+  Jump to the end of a frame from somewhere else by clicking on it
+  twice.
+\item
+  Skip the rest of the current frame by clicking on it once.
+\end{itemize}
+
+I also considered tried making a jump to an already-visited slide jump
+automatically to the last slide. However, this turned out to be
+more confusing than helpful. With the current implementation a
+double-click always brings you to the end of a slide, regardless from
+where you ``come.''
+
+
+
+
+
+\subsection{The Local Structure of Frames}
+
+Just like your whole presentation, each frame should also be
+structured. A frame that is solely filled with some long text is very
+hard to follow. It is your job to structure the contents of each frame
+such that, ideally, the audience immediately seems which information
+is important, which information is just a detail, how the presented
+information is related, and so on.
+
+\LaTeX\ provides different commands for structuring text ``locally,''
+for example, via the \texttt{itemize} environment. These environments
+are also available in the beamer class, although their appearance has
+been slightly changed. Furthermore, the \beamer\ class also defines
+some new commands and environments, see below, that may help you to
+structure your text.
+
+
+\subsubsection{Itemizations, Enumerations, and Descriptions}
+
+There are three predefined environments for creating lists, namely
+\verb!enumerate!, \verb!itemize!, and \verb!description!. The first
+two of there can be nested to depth two, but not further (this would
+create totally unreadable slides).
+
+The \verb!\item! command is overlay-specification-aware. If an overlay
+specification is provided, the item will only be shown on the
+specified slides, see the following example. If the \verb!\item!
+command is to take an optional argument and an overlay specification,
+the overlay specification comes first as in \verb!\item<1>[Cat]!.
+
+\begin{verbatim}
+\frame
+{
+  There are three important points:
+  \begin{enumerate}
+  \item<1-> A first one,
+  \item<2-> a second one with a bunch of subpoints,
+    \begin{itemize}
+    \item first subpoint. (Only shown from second slide on!).
+    \item<3-> second subpoint added on third slide.
+    \item<4-> third subpoint added on fourth slide.
+    \end{itemize}
+  \item<5-> and a third one.
+  \end{enumerate}
+}
+\end{verbatim}
+
+
+\Environment{itemize}
+\Description{
+  Used to display a list of items that do not have a special
+  ordering. Inside the environment, use an \texttt{item} command for
+  each topic. The appearence of the items can be changed using
+  templates, see Section~\ref{section-templates}.}
+\Example
+\begin{verbatim}
+\begin{itemize}
+\item This is important.
+\item This is also important.
+\end{itemize}
+\end{verbatim}
+
+
+\Environment{enumerate}
+\Description{
+  Used to display an ordered list of items. Inside the environment,
+  use an \texttt{item} command for each topic. The appearence of the
+  items can be changed using templates, see
+  Section~\ref{section-templates}.}
+\Example
+\begin{verbatim}
+\begin{enumerate}
+\item This is important.
+\item This is also important.
+\end{enumerate}
+\end{verbatim}
+
+
+\Environment{description}
+\Parameters{
+\item
+  Some text, given as an optional parameter in square brackets. The
+  width of the labels will be set to the width of this text. Normally,
+  you choose the widest label in the description and copy it here.
+  }
+\Description{
+  Used to display an list that explains or defines labels. Inside the
+  environment, use an \texttt{item} with an argument in square brackets
+  for each topic. The appearence of the items can be changed using
+  templates, see Section~\ref{section-templates}.}
+\Example
+\begin{verbatim}
+\begin{description}
+\item[Lion] King of the savanna.
+\item[Tiger] King of the jungle.
+\end{description}
+
+\begin{description}[longest label]
+\item<1->[short] Some text.
+\item<2->[longest label] Some text.
+\item<3->[long label] Some text.
+\end{description}
+\end{verbatim}
+
+
+
+
+\subsubsection{Block Environments and Simple Structure Commands}
 \label{predefined}
 
 The \beamer\ class predefines a number of useful environments and
 
 
 
+\subsubsection{Splitting a Frame into Multiple Columns}
+
+Three environments are used to create columns on a slide. Columns are
+especially useful for placing a graphic next to a description/explanation.
+The main environment for creating columns is called
+\verb!columns!. Inside this environment, you can place several
+\verb!column! environments. Each will create a new column.
+
+\Environment{columns}
+\Description{
+  A multi-column area. Inside the environment you should place only
+  \texttt{column} environments.}
+\Example
+\begin{verbatim}
+\begin{columns}
+  \begin{column}{5cm}
+    First column.
+  \end{column}
+  \begin{column}{5cm}
+    Second column.
+  \end{column}
+\end{columns}
+\end{verbatim}
+
+\Environment{columnsonlytextwidth}
+\Description{
+  This command has the same effect as \texttt{columns}, except that the
+  columns will not occupy the whole page width, but only the text
+  width. 
+  }
+
+\Environment{column}
+\Parameters{
+\item The width of the column.
+}
+\Description{
+  Creates a single column of the specified width. The column is
+  centered vertically relative to the other columns.}
+
+
+
+
+
+
 \section{Graphics, Animations, and Special Effects}
 
 \subsection{Graphics}
 \label{section-graphics}
 
-Graphics can often convey concepts or ideas much more efficiently than
+Graphics often convey concepts or ideas much more efficiently than
 text: A picture can say more than a thousand words. (Although,
 sometimes a word can say more than a thousand pictures.) In the
 following, the advantages and disadvantages of different possible ways
 
 One way of creating graphics for a presentation is to  use an 
 external program, like \texttt{xfig} or the Gimp. These programs
-have an option to \emph{export} a graphic files in a format that can
+have an option to \emph{export} graphic files in a format that can
 then be inserted into the presentation.
 
 The main advantage is:
 it may be advisable to use the special commands from the \textsc{pgf}
 package instead for this particular purpose. The reason is that
 \verb!\includegraphic! will put a copy of the graphic into the file
-upon each invocation. In particular, if a frame includes a graphic and
+upon each invocation. If a frame includes a graphic and
 shows this graphic on ten slides, then ten copies of the possibly
 large graphic file will be inserted into the presentation file. This
 can result in huge files.
 
 \begin{itemize}
 \item
-  The Computer Modern family has a very large of symbols available
-  that go well together.
+  The Computer Modern family has a very large number of symbols
+  available that go well together.
 \item
   Sans-serif fonts are (generally considered to be) easier to read
   when used in a presentation. In low resolution rendering, serifs