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Joseph Wright committed d4ffbef

Doc fixes from Daniel Arteaga

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doc/beamerug-installation.tex

 \begin{verbatim}
 http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Features/TeXLive
 \end{verbatim}
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 and it's also very likely that these packages will be a part of Fedora 14 once it's released.
 
 
 \begin{verbatim}
 http://bitbucket.org/rivanvx/beamer
 \end{verbatim}
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 (most likely, you have already done this). Next, you also need the \textsc{pgf} package and the \textsc{xcolor} packages, which you need to install separately (see their installation instructions).
 
 The package contains a bunch of files; |beamer.cls| is one of these files and happens to be the most important one. You now need to put these files in an appropriate |texmf| tree.
 \begin{verbatim}
 texmf/tex/latex/beamer
 \end{verbatim}
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 and place all files of the package in this directory.
 
 Finally, you need to rebuild \TeX's filename database. This is done by running the command |texhash| or |mktexlsr| (they are the same). In MiK\TeX package manager and \TeX\ Live |tlmgr|, there is a menu option to do this.
 \begin{verbatim}
 texmf/tex/latex/beamer
 \end{verbatim}
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 with the files of the new version. The easiest way to do this is to first delete the old version and then to proceed as described above.
 
 Note that if you have two versions installed, one in |texmf| and other in |texmf-local| directory, \TeX\ distribution will prefer one in |texmf-local| directory. This generally allows you to update packages manually without administrator privileges.
 \begin{verbatim}
 beamer/solutions/generic-talks
 \end{verbatim}
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 to some place where you usually create presentations. Then run the command |pdflatex| several times on the file and check whether the resulting \pdf\ file looks correct. If so, you are all set.
 
 \lyxnote

doc/beamerug-tutorial.tex

 \begin{verbatim}
 beamer/solutions/conference-talks/conference-ornate-20min.en.tex
 \end{verbatim}
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 might be appropriate. He creates a subdirectory |presentation| in the directory that contains the actual paper and copies the solution template to this subdirectory, renaming to |main.tex|.
 
 \lyxnote
 \begin{verbatim}
 beamer/solutions/conference-talks/conference-ornate-20min.en.lyx
 \end{verbatim}
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 He opens the file in his favorite editor. It starts
 \begin{verbatim}
 \documentclass{beamer}
 \end{verbatim}
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 which Euclid finds hardly surprising. Next comes a line reading
 \begin{verbatim}
 \mode<presentation>
 \end{verbatim}
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 which Euclid does not understand. Since he finds more stuff in the file that he does not understand, he decides to ignore all of that for time being, hoping that it all serves some good purpose.
 
 
 \begin{verbatim}
 \title{There Is No Largest Prime Number}
 \end{verbatim}
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 since this was the title of the paper. He sees that the command |\title| also takes an optional ``short'' argument in square brackets, which is shown in places where there is little space, but he decides that the title is short enough by itself.
 
 Euclid next adjusts the |\author| and |\date| fields as follows:
 %\author{Euclid of Alexandria}
 %\date[ISPN '80]{27th International Symposium of Prime Numbers}
 \end{verbatim}
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 For the date, he felt that the name was a little long, so a short version is given (|ISPN '80|). On second thought, Euclid decides to add his email address and replaces the |\author| field as follows:
 \begin{verbatim}
 %\author[Euclid]{Euclid of Alexandria \\ \texttt{euclid@alexandria.edu}}
 \end{verbatim}
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 Somehow Euclid does not like the fact that there is no ``|\email|'' command in \beamer. He decides to write an email to \beamer's author, asking him to fix this, but postpones this for later when the presentation is finished.
 
 There are two fields that Euclid does not know, but whose meaning he can guess: |\subtitle| and |\institute|. He adjusts them. (Euclid does not need to use the |\and| command, which is used to separate several authors, nor the |\inst| command, which just makes its argument a superscript).
   \titlepage
 \end{frame}
 \end{verbatim}
-
 In \beamer, a presentation consists of a series of frames. Each frame in turn may consist of several slides (if there is more than one, they are called overlays). Normally, everything between |\begin{frame}| and |\end{frame}| is put on a single slide. No page breaking is performed. So Euclid infers that the first frame is ``filled'' by the title page, which seems quite logical.
 
 \lyxnote
   \tableofcontents
 \end{frame}
 \end{verbatim}
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 Furthermore, this frame has an individual title (Outline). A comment in the frame says that Euclid might wish to try to add the |[pausesections]| option. He tries this, changing the frame to:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \begin{frame}
 \section{Motivation}
 \subsection{The Basic Problem That We Studied}
 \end{verbatim}
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 These commands are given \emph{outside} of frames. So Euclid assumes that at the point of invocation they have no direct effect, they only create entries in the table of contents. Having a ``Motivation'' section seems reasonable to Euclid, but he changes the |\subsection| title.
 
 As he looks at the presentation, he notices that his assumption was not quite true: each |\subsection| command seems to insert a frame containing a table of contents into the presentation. Doubling back he finds the command that causes this: The |\AtBeginSubsection| inserts a frame with only the current subsection highlighted at the beginning of each section. If Euclid does not like this, he can just delete the whole |\AtBeginSubsection| stuff and the table of contents at the beginning of each subsection disappears.
   A prime number is a number that has exactly two divisors.
 \end{frame}
 \end{verbatim}
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 This yields the desired result. It might be a good idea to put some emphasis on the object being defined (prime numbers). Euclid tries |\emph| but finds that too mild an emphasis. \beamer\ offers the command |\alert|, which is used like |\emph| and, by default, typesets its argument in bright red.
 
 \lyxnote
   ...
 \end{frame}
 \end{verbatim}
-
 Vice versa, if the |t| class option is given, a frame can be vertically centered using the |[c]| option for the frame.
 
 It turns out that certain environments, including the |theorem| and |proof| environments above, also take overlay specifications. If such a specification is given, the whole theorem or proof is only shown on the specified slides.
 %\newtheorem{answeredquestions}[theorem]{Answered Questions}
 %\newtheorem{openquestions}[theorem]{Open Questions}
 \end{verbatim}
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 The optional argument |[theorem]| ensures that these environments are numbered the same way as everything else. Since these numbers are not shown anyway, it does not really matter whether they are given, but it's a good practice and, perhaps, Euclid might need these numbers some other time.
 
 An alternative would be nested |itemize|:
   \visible<4->{Note the use of \alert{\texttt{std::}}.}
 \end{frame}
 \end{verbatim}
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 The |\visible| command does nearly the same as |\uncover|. A difference occurs if the command |\setbeamercovered{transparent}| has been used to make covered text ``transparent'' instead, |\visible| still makes the text completely ``invisible'' on non-specified slides. Euclid has the feeling that the naming convention is a bit strange, but cannot quite pinpoint the problem.
 
 
 \usecolortheme{seahorse}
 \usecolortheme{rose}
 \end{verbatim}
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 The result seems some more subdued to him.
 
 Euclid decides that the font used for the titles is not quite classical enough (classical fonts are the latest chic in Alexandria). So, he adds
 \begin{verbatim}
 \usefonttheme[onlylarge]{structuresmallcapsserif}
 \end{verbatim}
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 Euclid notices that the small fonts in the navigation bars are a bit hard to read as they are so thin. Adding the following helps:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \usefonttheme[onlysmall]{structurebold}
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamercolor{title}{fg=red!80!black}
 \end{verbatim}
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 Trying the following command, Euclid is delighted to find that specifying a background color also has an effect:
 \begin{verbatim}
 \setbeamercolor{title}{fg=red!80!black,bg=red!20!white}