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beamer / doc / beamerug-overlays.tex

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doc/beamerug-overlays.tex

   \articlenote
   This command is ignored.
 
-  \lyxnote
-  Use the ``Pause'' style with an empty line to insert a pause.
 \end{command}
 
 To ``unpause'' some text, that is, to temporarily suspend pausing, use the command |\onslide|, see below.
 
 The syntax of (basic) overlay specifications is the following: They are comma-separated lists of slides and ranges. Ranges are specified like this: |2-5|, which means slide two through to five. The start or the end of a range can be omitted. For example, |3-| means ``slides three, four, five, and so on'' and |-5| means the same as |1-5|. A complicated example is |-3,6-8,10,12-15|, which selects the slides 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, and 15.
 
-\lyxnote
-Overlay specifications can also be given in \LyX. You must give them in \TeX-mode (otherwise the pointed brackets may be ``escaped'' by \LyX, though this will not happen in all versions). For example, to add an overlay specification to an item, simply insert a \TeX-mode text like |<3>| as the first thing in that item. Likewise, you can add an overlay specification to environments like |theorem| by giving them in \TeX-mode right at the start of the environment.
-
 
 \subsection{Commands with Overlay Specifications}
 \label{section-overlay-commands}
   \articlenote
   The \meta{action specification} is currently completely ignored.
 
-  \lyxnote
-  The \meta{action specification} must be given in \TeX-mode and it must be given at the very start of the item.
 \end{command}
 
 The related command |\bibitem| is also overlay specification-aware in the same way as |\item|.
 \end{overlayarea}
 \end{verbatim}
 
-  \lyxnote
-  Use the style ``OverlayArea'' to insert an overlay area.
 \end{environment}
 
 \begin{environment}{{overprint}\oarg{area width}}
 \end{overprint}
 \end{verbatim}
 
-  \lyxnote
-  Use the style ``Overprint'' to insert an |overprint| environment. You have to use \TeX-mode to insert the |\onslide| commands.
 \end{environment}
 
 A similar need for dynamical changes arises when you have, say, a series of pictures named |first.pdf|, |second.pdf|, and |third.pdf| that show different stages of some process. To make a frame that shows these pictures on different slides, the following code might be used: