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PyObjC documentation index</title>
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<h2>PyObjC documentation index</h2>
<p>PyObjC is a bridge between Python and Objective-C.  It allows you to write
Python scripts that use and extend existing Objective-C class libraries,
most importantly the <a href="http://developer.apple.com/documentation/Cocoa/Cocoa.html">Cocoa libraries</a> by <a href="http://www.apple.com/">Apple</a>.</p>
<p>More information can be found on <a href="http://pyobjc.sf.net">our website</a></p>
<h2><a name="general-user-documentation">General user documentation</a></h2>
<p>The following documents are useful when you're interested in developing
Cocoa applications in Python.</p>
<ul>
<li><a href="intro.html">An introduction to PyObjC</a><p>An overview of the PyObjC package and how to use it.  Read this before
you start using the package, it will help you to avoid some surprises.</p>
</li>
<li><a href="classes.html">Python classes and Objective-C code</a><p>Another older overview of PyObjC.</p>
</li>
<li><a href="api-notes-macosx.html">Notes on supported APIs and classes on Mac OS X</a><p>This document lists the methods and classes that are not fully supported,
or supported in an 'unexpected' way.</p>
</li>
<li><a href="wrapping.html">How to wrap an Objective-C class library</a><p>This explains how you can provide a python wrapper for an existing 
Objective-C class library.</p>
</li>
</ul>
<h2><a name="tutorials">Tutorials</a></h2>
<ul>
<li><a href="tutorial/tutorial.html">Creating your first PyObjC application (tutorial)</a><p>This tutorial guides you though creating a Python based Cocoa application.</p>
</li>
<li><a href="tutorial_embed/extending_objc_with_python.html">Adding Python code to an existing Objective-C application</a><p>This tutorial teaches you how to extend you existing Objective-C based
Cocoa application using Python.</p>
</li>
</ul>
<h2><a name="examples">Examples</a></h2>
<p>The source tree includes a number of examples, see the <a href="../Examples/00ReadMe.html">list of examples</a> for
more information.</p>
<h2><a name="technical-documentation">Technical documentation</a></h2>
<p>These documents are only relevant if you want to modify PyObjC, not if
you want to write Cocoa programs in Python.</p>
<ul>
<li><a href="coding-style.html">Coding style for PyObjC</a><p>Rules for formatting code and documentation.</p>
</li>
<li><a href="structure.html">Structure of the PyObjC package</a><p>An overview of the implementation of PyObjC.</p>
</li>
<li><a href="Xcode-Templates.html">Xcode Python templates</a><p>Describes the PyObjC Xcode templates.</p>
</li>
</ul>
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