Commits

shl...@cec68495-dca5-4e2b-845c-11fdaaa4f967  committed 4e06238

Changed "Advice for Youngsters" to "Advice for the Young".

  • Participants
  • Parent commits 21bcabb

Comments (0)

Files changed (4)

File lib/Shlomif/Homepage/SectionMenu/Sects/Essays.pm

                 {
                     'text' => "What is Open Source?",
                     'url' => "philosophy/foss-other-beasts/",
-                    'title' => "Free Software, Open Source and Other Beasts",
+                    'title' => "Open Source, Free Software and Other Beasts",
                 },
                 {
                     'text' => "Perl & Newcomers",
                     'text' => "Guide to Neo-Tech",
                     'url' => "philosophy/philosophy/guide-to-neo-tech/",
                 },
+                {
+                    'text' => "Advice for the Young",
+                    'url' => "philosophy/philosophy/advice-for-the-young/",
+                    'title' => "Advice for the Young (and for the not-so Young)",
+                },
             ],
         },
     ],

File t2/philosophy/philosophy/advice-for-the-young/index.html.wml

+#include '../template.wml'
+
+<latemp_subject "Shlomi Fish' Advice for the Young" />
+
+<h2 id="intro">Introduction</h2>
+
+<p>
+There used to be a common meme to offer advice to high school and college
+students. Here is my advice, based on what I know, and practice:
+</p>
+
+<h2 id="live_and_learn">"Live like you were going to die tomorrow; Learn 
+like you were going to live forever"</h2>
+
+<p>
+This is the single best piece of advice one could give, but you'd amazed how
+many people defy it. (It's attributed to Mahatamma Gandhi.) Most people I know
+don't seem to have time for anything. They are crowded with responsiblities.
+"We're too busy", they say.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+I'm not too busy, and never will be. When I worked or studied I also was never
+too busy to talk to people I liked or met at that time; to work on open source
+software and web sites; to relax; to help people with their computer problems.
+I became relatively popular. More people knew me by name than I could recall
+them. (including some very pretty girls, albeit with them I usually recalled
+their names eventually). Everyone knew I was one of the resident UNIX gurus. It
+was fun.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+I treasure the few people who always answer my E-mails on time, always have
+time to chat on the phone, unless they have a previous engagement. Know well
+enough that one doesn't become productive by 
+<a href="http://www.igda.org/articles/erobinson_crunch.php">working more than 
+40 hours a week</a>, and always say "I'll do it when I have some spare 
+cycles" instead of "I don't have time to do it."
+</p>
+
+<p>
+You must be able to dedicate some time for your top priorities because you are
+going to die tomorrow.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+And there are people who refuse to learn anything. They don't have time and
+think that by not learning and acquiring new skills, they'll still be
+successful. Java people think Java is the best thing since sliced bread and
+don't learn Perl, Python or Ruby. C++ people don't know how straightforward
+and painless Object-Oriented programming is in high-level languages.
+Programmers who are used to Perl 4 writing Perl 5 scripts the Perl 4 way,
+despite knowing Perl 5 pretty well. The list goes on.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Such persons are the worst. They may be pretty good at what they do, but
+they'll never get better, and will maintain their code in a language that will
+become deprecated and then have to learn something new after not practicing
+their learning skills for a long time.
+</p>
+
+<h2 id="recommended_writings">Writings to Learn and Integrate</h2>
+
+<p>
+Learn and Integrate the following things. By integrate, I meat take the time 
+to digest and don't reject as absurd on the spot. Note that you have to <b>read 
+them from cover to cover</b> and not to skip in between, otherwise you'll
+get a lot of false impressions.
+</p>
+
+<ul>
+<li>
+Eric S. Raymond's 
+<a href="http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/hacker-howto.html">How 
+to Become a Hacker</a> and
+<a href="http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/cathedral-bazaar/">the Cathedral
+and the Bazaar series</a>
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.shlomifish.org/philosophy/philosophy/guide-to-neo-tech/">The
+Online Neo-Tech resources</a>. 
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.shlomifish.org/philosophy/books-recommends/#feeling_good">Feeling
+Good by David A. Burns</a>
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.joelonsoftware.com/">Joel on Software</a> - most articles 
+are recommended.
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.extremeprogramming.com/">Extreme Programming</a>
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/">Paul Graham's Essays</a>
+</li>
+</ul>
+
+<h2 id="windows_is_dead">Windows will be dead; Microsoft may or may not Die with it.</h2>
+
+<p>
+I put my money that practically the majority of people would switch to
+UNIX-based OSes (most notably the various distributions of Linux and Mac
+OS X) a few years from now. Linux nay-sayers are having less and less good
+arguments to support Linux that "just works", is easier to use, requires less
+constant maintenance, and have so many technical advantages over Windows that
+enumerating all of them here would be not possible. 
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Just search for <a href="http://www.google.com/search?q=%22linux%20vs.%20windows%22">"Linux vs. Windows"</a> or "Open Source vs. Windows.". Windows is trying 
+to catch up but usually gives solutions that are either buggy at first or 
+not as integrated, or not as good or worse, or simply too little too 
+late. In Microsoft conferences, the Microsofties are notorious for getting 
+excited about new Windows features that Linux has had for years. The Win32 API
+is horrible and very programmer unfriendly, while the various Unix APIs are 
+in very good shape.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Windows Vista will come without any of the features that were most
+publicized. Development on Windows is slowing to a halt. Meanwhile development
+on the various components that make a Linux system is progressing at a greater
+and greater speed. There seems to be a huge shortage in clueful Linux workers
+at least here in Israel. No-one can find any. Linux is hot.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Microsoft will probably survive. It has .NET which is very portable. (either
+the proprietary version by Microsoft which runs fine on FreeBSD), or the
+open-source Mono. It also has many other good products and some decent APIs
+that can be ported to Linux. But Windows is dead.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+I'm not as 
+<a href="http://lxer.com/module/newswire/view/16376/index.html">paranoid as 
+ESR is</a> about what Microsoft will do next. I think they
+will simply embrace Linux, port their software to run on it. We will see
+programs written in the Win32 API and APIs above that for years to
+come. (There are still programs that run under DOS, and were not 
+ported yet.)
+</p>
+
+<h2 id="technologies_to_learn">Learn Many Different and Orthogonal 
+Technologies</h2>
+
+<p>
+You should learn the following languages and technologies:
+</p>
+
+<ul>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/">HTML</a> and XHTML.
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://perl-begin.berlios.de/">Perl</a>
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_programming_language">The C Programming
+Language</a>
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/bash.html">Bash</a> or 
+<a href="http://www.zsh.org/">Zsh</a>.
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.python.org/">Python</a>
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://java.sun.com/">Java</a>
+</li>
+<li>
+The Assembly of one or more architectures.
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisp_programming_language">Lisp</a> and
+<a href="http://www.schemers.org/">Scheme</a>
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://xml.com/">XML</a> and related technologies (but not all).
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.haskell.org/">Haskell</a> and 
+<a href="http://caml.inria.fr/">O'Caml</a>
+</li>
+<li>
+Matlab or a similar tool for bulk operatioins on tensors, like Perl's
+<a href="http://pdl.perl.org/">PDL</a> or Python's SciPy.
+</li>
+</ul>
+
+<p>
+These are languages I recommend you to learn. They were the languages that
+provided me with the most inspiration and insights. I don't like all of them
+as much as I do others, but they are nonetheless truly enlightening. I believe
+Perl or Python (etc.) are the most useful of them, and also the most suitable 
+for learning as a first programming language.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Another point is to learn about the design of digital circuits (out of logical
+gates and Flip-flops, not the transistor composition of them) and about
+computer architectures. Too many programmers don't have a good understanding
+of a how a computer really works, which ends up showing in sub-optimal code.
+</p>
+
+<h2 id="growth_death">Always reverse your growth death.</h2>
+
+<p>
+Growth death means you've stopped to grow, and become more cynical as time
+goes by and less capable. It is unnecessary because some people have never
+had growth death in their entire life time, while one of my friend already 
+had it in his mid-to-late twenties. I never experienced growth death, and 
+still grow in my skills, capability and productivity. You should too.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+There are no caveats. Either you grow or you don't. And nothing necessitates
+that you don't grow. People in concentration camps sometimes never stopped
+growing, and often experienced spiritual or intellectual enlightenings.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+It doesn't matter how many responsibilities you have, you never have to stop
+growing. I have been corresponding with a man in his late 70's , who is still 
+programming, travels a lot, is very active, and is otherwise very enthusiastic 
+about life. So he also still has a living growth.
+</p>
+
+<h2 id="proper_language">Speak and Write Properly in English and in your Mother Tongue</h2>
+
+<p>
+This is something that Eric S. Raymond suggests in "How to become
+a Hacker", but many people still ignore. Speaking in a language with
+many mistakes, will cause people to look down on you, and they'll
+immediately notice the problems in what you speak. Whenever I write something
+in either English or Hebrew, I make sure to phrase myself properly. Whenever
+I learn of a new Hebrew common mistake, I immediately register it, and notice
+it from then onward. I never consciously write it, and try to correct myself
+if I utter it improperly. Other people whom I constantly remark on improper
+language, still make these mistakes, and I wonder how much conscious effort
+they put into their writing.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Note that all-lowercase writing, while acceptable on the IRC (albeit I
+do not write this way either) is completely frowned upon in E-mails, and 
+leaves an impression of lack of professionality, no time and care to press the 
+shift key, and general dislect. Don't do it. Putting such improperly-written
+language on the Web is even more harmful. (and often mailing lists 
+are archived on the Web for prosperity).
+</p>
+
+<h2 id="history">Learn History in General and the History of Computing in 
+Particular</h2>
+
+<p>
+Paul Graham <a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/essay.html">recommends that 
+people learn History but not so much political
+history, but cultural, technological and artistic history</a>. He's right in a 
+way. Knowing who conquered who at what time is quite useless. Knowing how 
+things developed and how people thought or behaved at the time, or what 
+happened is actually useful and enlightening.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Many people graduate from Computer Science degrees, hardly knowing anything
+about Computer history. They are familiar with Knuth, Dijkstra and other great
+names, only througout the algorithms they have formulated, and are not familiar
+with when things came to being, or why they are this way at all. There are many
+good resources for learning about computer history on the Net, and you should
+probably read them. Chatting on the IRC in the appropriate channels can also
+help you learn more about it.
+</p>
+
+<h2 id="thanks">Thanks</h2>
+
+<p>
+Thanks to the <a href="http://www.freenode.net/">Freenode</a> people Darien, 
+crimson_penguin, GXTi and quamaretto for commenting on earlier drafts of this 
+essay.
+</p>
+
+<h2 id="other_sources">Other Good Sources of Advice</h2>
+
+<ol>
+<li>
+Eric Raymond's <a href="http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/hacker-howto.html">How
+to Become a Hacker</a> - an excellent document about the hacker's way of life,
+attitude and practices.
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/hs.html">What You'll Wish You'd Known
+- Paul Graham's Advice for High School Students</a>
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/college.html">Paul Graham's Advice
+for Undergraduate College Students</a>
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/CollegeAdvice.html">Joel 
+Spolsky's Advice for Computer Science College Students</a>
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.swarthmore.edu/~apreset1/docs/if.html">"If" by Rudyard
+Kipling</a>
+</li>
+<li>
+<a href="http://www.generationterrorists.com/quotes/sunscreen.html">Everybody's
+Free (to Wear Sunscreen)</a>. Just don't take it too seriously...
+</li>
+</ol>

File t2/philosophy/philosophy/advice-for-youngsters/index.html.wml

-#include '../template.wml'
-
-<latemp_subject "Shlomi Fish' Advice for Youngsters" />
-
-<h2 id="intro">Introduction</h2>
-
-<p>
-There used to be a common meme to offer advice to high school and college
-students. Here is my advice, based on what I know, and practice:
-</p>
-
-<h2 id="live_and_learn">"Live like you were going to die tomorrow; Learn 
-like you were going to live forever"</h2>
-
-<p>
-This is the single best piece of advice one could give, but you'd amazed how
-many people defy it. (It's attributed to Mahatamma Gandhi.) Most people I know
-don't seem to have time for anything. They are crowded with responsiblities.
-"We're too busy", they say.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-I'm not too busy, and never will be. When I worked or studied I also was never
-too busy to talk to people I liked or met at that time; to work on open source
-software and web sites; to relax; to help people with their computer problems.
-I became relatively popular. More people knew me by name than I could recall
-them. (including some very pretty girls, albeit with them I usually recalled
-their names eventually). Everyone knew I was one of the resident UNIX gurus. It
-was fun.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-I treasure the few people who always answer my E-mails on time, always have
-time to chat on the phone, unless they have a previous engagement. Know well
-enough that one doesn't become productive by 
-<a href="http://www.igda.org/articles/erobinson_crunch.php">working more than 
-40 hours a week</a>, and always say "I'll do it when I have some spare 
-cycles" instead of "I don't have time to do it."
-</p>
-
-<p>
-You must be able to dedicate some time for your top priorities because you are
-going to die tomorrow.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-And there are people who refuse to learn anything. They don't have time and
-think that by not learning and acquiring new skills, they'll still be
-successful. Java people think Java is the best thing since sliced bread and
-don't learn Perl, Python or Ruby. C++ people don't know how straightforward
-and painless Object-Oriented programming is in high-level languages.
-Programmers who are used to Perl 4 writing Perl 5 scripts the Perl 4 way,
-despite knowing Perl 5 pretty well. The list goes on.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-Such persons are the worst. They may be pretty good at what they do, but
-they'll never get better, and will maintain their code in a language that will
-become deprecated and then have to learn something new after not practicing
-their learning skills for a long time.
-</p>
-
-<h2 id="recommended_writings">Writings to Learn and Integrate</h2>
-
-<p>
-Learn and Integrate the following things. By integrate, I meat take the time 
-to digest and don't reject as absurd on the spot. Note that you have to <b>read 
-them from cover to cover</b> and not to skip in between, otherwise you'll
-get a lot of false impressions.
-</p>
-
-<ul>
-<li>
-Eric S. Raymond's 
-<a href="http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/hacker-howto.html">How 
-to Become a Hacker</a> and
-<a href="http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/cathedral-bazaar/">the Cathedral
-and the Bazaar series</a>
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.shlomifish.org/philosophy/philosophy/guide-to-neo-tech/">The
-Online Neo-Tech resources</a>. 
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.shlomifish.org/philosophy/books-recommends/#feeling_good">Feeling
-Good by David A. Burns</a>
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.joelonsoftware.com/">Joel on Software</a> - most articles 
-are recommended.
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.extremeprogramming.com/">Extreme Programming</a>
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/">Paul Graham's Essays</a>
-</li>
-</ul>
-
-<h2 id="windows_is_dead">Windows will be dead; Microsoft may or may not Die with it.</h2>
-
-<p>
-I put my money that practically the majority of people would switch to
-UNIX-based OSes (most notably the various distributions of Linux and Mac
-OS X) a few years from now. Linux nay-sayers are having less and less good
-arguments to support Linux that "just works", is easier to use, requires less
-constant maintenance, and have so many technical advantages over Windows that
-enumerating all of them here would be not possible. 
-</p>
-
-<p>
-Just search for <a href="http://www.google.com/search?q=%22linux%20vs.%20windows%22">"Linux vs. Windows"</a> or "Open Source vs. Windows.". Windows is trying 
-to catch up but usually gives solutions that are either buggy at first or 
-not as integrated, or not as good or worse, or simply too little too 
-late. In Microsoft conferences, the Microsofties are notorious for getting 
-excited about new Windows features that Linux has had for years. The Win32 API
-is horrible and very programmer unfriendly, while the various Unix APIs are 
-in very good shape.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-Windows Vista will come without any of the features that were most
-publicized. Development on Windows is slowing to a halt. Meanwhile development
-on the various components that make a Linux system is progressing at a greater
-and greater speed. There seems to be a huge shortage in clueful Linux workers
-at least here in Israel. No-one can find any. Linux is hot.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-Microsoft will probably survive. It has .NET which is very portable. (either
-the proprietary version by Microsoft which runs fine on FreeBSD), or the
-open-source Mono. It also has many other good products and some decent APIs
-that can be ported to Linux. But Windows is dead.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-I'm not as 
-<a href="http://lxer.com/module/newswire/view/16376/index.html">paranoid as 
-ESR is</a> about what Microsoft will do next. I think they
-will simply embrace Linux, port their software to run on it. We will see
-programs written in the Win32 API and APIs above that for years to
-come. (There are still programs that run under DOS, and were not 
-ported yet.)
-</p>
-
-<h2 id="technologies_to_learn">Learn Many Different and Orthogonal 
-Technologies</h2>
-
-<p>
-You should learn the following languages and technologies:
-</p>
-
-<ul>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/">HTML</a> and XHTML.
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://perl-begin.berlios.de/">Perl</a>
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C_programming_language">The C Programming
-Language</a>
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/bash.html">Bash</a> or 
-<a href="http://www.zsh.org/">Zsh</a>.
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.python.org/">Python</a>
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://java.sun.com/">Java</a>
-</li>
-<li>
-The Assembly of one or more architectures.
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lisp_programming_language">Lisp</a> and
-<a href="http://www.schemers.org/">Scheme</a>
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://xml.com/">XML</a> and related technologies (but not all).
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.haskell.org/">Haskell</a> and 
-<a href="http://caml.inria.fr/">O'Caml</a>
-</li>
-<li>
-Matlab or a similar tool for bulk operatioins on tensors, like Perl's
-<a href="http://pdl.perl.org/">PDL</a> or Python's SciPy.
-</li>
-</ul>
-
-<p>
-These are languages I recommend you to learn. They were the languages that
-provided me with the most inspiration and insights. I don't like all of them
-as much as I do others, but they are nonetheless truly enlightening. I believe
-Perl or Python (etc.) are the most useful of them, and also the most suitable 
-for learning as a first programming language.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-Another point is to learn about the design of digital circuits (out of logical
-gates and Flip-flops, not the transistor composition of them) and about
-computer architectures. Too many programmers don't have a good understanding
-of a how a computer really works, which ends up showing in sub-optimal code.
-</p>
-
-<h2 id="growth_death">Always reverse your growth death.</h2>
-
-<p>
-Growth death means you've stopped to grow, and become more cynical as time
-goes by and less capable. It is unnecessary because some people have never
-had growth death in their entire life time, while one of my friend already 
-had it in his mid-to-late twenties. I never experienced growth death, and 
-still grow in my skills, capability and productivity. You should too.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-There are no caveats. Either you grow or you don't. And nothing necessitates
-that you don't grow. People in concentration camps sometimes never stopped
-growing, and often experienced spiritual or intellectual enlightenings.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-It doesn't matter how many responsibilities you have, you never have to stop
-growing. I have been corresponding with a man in his late 70's , who is still 
-programming, travels a lot, is very active, and is otherwise very enthusiastic 
-about life. So he also still has a living growth.
-</p>
-
-<h2 id="proper_language">Speak and Write Properly in English and in your Mother Tongue</h2>
-
-<p>
-This is something that Eric S. Raymond suggests in "How to become
-a Hacker", but many people still ignore. Speaking in a language with
-many mistakes, will cause people to look down on you, and they'll
-immediately notice the problems in what you speak. Whenever I write something
-in either English or Hebrew, I make sure to phrase myself properly. Whenever
-I learn of a new Hebrew common mistake, I immediately register it, and notice
-it from then onward. I never consciously write it, and try to correct myself
-if I utter it improperly. Other people whom I constantly remark on improper
-language, still make these mistakes, and I wonder how much conscious effort
-they put into their writing.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-Note that all-lowercase writing, while acceptable on the IRC (albeit I
-do not write this way either) is completely frowned upon in E-mails, and 
-leaves an impression of lack of professionality, no time and care to press the 
-shift key, and general dislect. Don't do it. Putting such improperly-written
-language on the Web is even more harmful. (and often mailing lists 
-are archived on the Web for prosperity).
-</p>
-
-<h2 id="history">Learn History in General and the History of Computing in 
-Particular</h2>
-
-<p>
-Paul Graham <a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/essay.html">recommends that 
-people learn History but not so much political
-history, but cultural, technological and artistic history</a>. He's right in a 
-way. Knowing who conquered who at what time is quite useless. Knowing how 
-things developed and how people thought or behaved at the time, or what 
-happened is actually useful and enlightening.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-Many people graduate from Computer Science degrees, hardly knowing anything
-about Computer history. They are familiar with Knuth, Dijkstra and other great
-names, only througout the algorithms they have formulated, and are not familiar
-with when things came to being, or why they are this way at all. There are many
-good resources for learning about computer history on the Net, and you should
-probably read them. Chatting on the IRC in the appropriate channels can also
-help you learn more about it.
-</p>
-
-<h2 id="thanks">Thanks</h2>
-
-<p>
-Thanks to the Freenode people Darien, crimson_penguin, GXTi and quamaretto
-for commenting on earlier drafts of this essay.
-</p>
-
-<h2 id="other_sources">Other Good Sources of Advice</h2>
-
-<ol>
-<li>
-Eric Raymond's <a href="http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/hacker-howto.html">How
-to Become a Hacker</a> - an excellent document about the hacker's way of life,
-attitude and practices.
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/hs.html">What You'll Wish You'd Known
-- Paul Graham's Advice for High School Students</a>
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/college.html">Paul Graham's Advice
-for Undergraduate College Students</a>
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/CollegeAdvice.html">Joel 
-Spolsky's Advice for Computer Science College Students</a>
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.swarthmore.edu/~apreset1/docs/if.html">"If" by Rudyard
-Kipling</a>
-</li>
-<li>
-<a href="http://www.generationterrorists.com/quotes/sunscreen.html">Everybody's
-Free (to Wear Sunscreen)</a>. Just don't take it too seriously...
-</li>
-</ol>

File t2/philosophy/philosophy/index.html.wml

 mind-blowing philosophical system.
 </p>
 
-<h3><a href="./advice-for-youngsters/">Advice for Youngsters</a></h3>
+<h3><a href="./advice-for-the-young/">Advice for the Young</a></h3>
 
 <p>
-Some advice for people. Especially young ones.
+Some advice for people, especially young ones. Mostly intended for those
+who are interested in computing, but some of it is also pertinent to others.
 <p>