Shlomi Fish avatar Shlomi Fish committed 4f9dceb

Spell checked Perl-for-Newbies.

Comments (0)

Files changed (50)

bin/spell-checker-iface.sh

 #!/bin/bash
 find dest/t2-homepage/ -name '*.html' -or -name '*.xhtml' |
     ( LC_ALL=C sort  ) |
-    perl -lne 'print if 1..m#lecture/Perl/Lightning/Too-Many-Ways/slides/start#'|
+    perl -lne 'print if 1..m#lecture/Perl/Newbies/lecture5/version-control/motivation#'|
     grep -vP 'guide2ee/undergrad' |
     grep -vP '(?:humour/TheEnemy/(?:The-Enemy-(?:English-)?rev|TheEnemy))' |
     grep -vP '(?:humour/by-others/(?:English-is-a-Crazy-Language|darien|hitchhiker|how-many-newsgroup-readers|oded-c|s-stands-for-simple|technion-bit-1|top-12-things-likely|was-the-death-star-attack|grad-student-jokes-from-jnoakes))' |

lib/docbook/4/xml/perfect-it-workplace.xml

                     in PHP. Now since I know and love Perl, I know there
                     are many fine modules for doing that on <ulink url="http://sial.org/howto/perl/life-with-cpan/">CPAN (= The
                         Comprensive Perl Archive Network)</ulink>, but there
-                    was little of subtantial quality for PHP. At a certain
+                    was little of substantial quality for PHP. At a certain
                     time I needed to register at a site, to download the
                     latest version of a PHP library, that was free software,
                     because the download required authentication. There didn't
                     That wasn't all. They also decided against using <ulink
                         url="http://www.postfix.org/">Postfix</ulink>,
                     which is a modern, high-performance and open-source
-                    SMTP server, and instead prefered the old
+                    SMTP server, and instead preferred the old
                     Sendmail SMTP server which has a far worse reputation,
                     and an arcane configuration system.
                 </para>

lib/docbook/5/xml/perfect-it-workplace-v2.xml

                     in PHP. Now since I know and love Perl, I know there
                     are many fine modules for doing that on <link xlink:href="http://perl-begin.org/topics/cpan/">CPAN (= The
                         Comprensive Perl Archive Network)</link>, but there
-                    was little of subtantial quality for PHP. At a certain
+                    was little of substantial quality for PHP. At a certain
                     time I needed to register at a site, to download the
                     latest version of a PHP library, that was open-source
                     software, because the download required authentication

lib/hunspell/whitelist1.txt

 prepend
 kilometrage
 resizable
+arithmetics
 
 ====dest/t2-homepage/index.html,dest/t2-homepage/old-news.html
 Owch
 with_mojo
 xrl
 'Yea
+
+
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+new_elem
+new_first_name
+new_last_name
+new_name
+NEW_VALUE_EXPR
+NIS
+nlink
+NoAuth
+non-whitespace
+N-th
+'number
+number_to_check
+num_disks
+num_elems
+num_primes
+'num_times
+num_times
+N-ZA-Mn-za-m
+'o
+object_ref
+object_ref-
+ok
+oncatc
+oncatconcatconcatconcatconcatconcatc
+ong
+opendir
+operation_ref
+orr
+'p
+p4n
+pacem
+passwd
+perform_transaction
+perl5
+perl-5
+perl5db
+perl-begin
+perlboot
+perlbot
+perldebug
+perldoc
+Perldoc
+perldocs
+perlfaq6
+perlfunc
+perlmod
+Perlmonks
+perl-newbie
+perlobj
+perlop
+perlpod
+perlre
+perlref
+perlrequick
+perlreref
+perlretut
+perl's
+Perls
+Perl's
+perlsyn
+perl-test-manage
+perl-test-manage-helper
+perltoot
+perlvar
+petdance
+pl
+PL
+placeholder
+placeholders
+power_of_2
+pragma
+primes1
+primes2
+'print
+printf
+print_myvar
+print_to_process
+print_towers
+programatically
+PseudoPod
+put_index
+pwd
+pyramid_side
+pythagoras
+qq
+quit_program
+qw
+qx
+rachel
+rdev
+read_and_write
+readdir
+read_from_process
+README
+'README
+read_text
+realloc
+refactor
+ref_to_sum
+regex
+Regex
+regexp
+ReportBug
+ret
+RLE
+rle_components
+rm
+rot13
+rot13'ing
+ROW_LOOP
+-rw-r--r--
+sbin
+scalar1
+scalar2
+secs
+sed
+SEEK_CUR
+SEEK_END
+SEEK_SET
+sendmail
+seq1
+seq2
+set_age
+ShellQuote
+shlomi
+shlomif-
+Shmuel
+short_comments
+shortcut
+sigils
+site_perl
+sorted_array
+source_fn
+source_handle
+sprintf
+srand
+src
+Ss
+startup
+stat
+'status
+STDERR
+STDOUT
+str
+string1
+string2
+String-ShellQuote
+'style
+su
+sub-expr
+sub-namespaces
+'subs
+subseqeunt
+substr
+substring
+subtests
+sys
+Szabo
+'t
+test_array
+'Test-Count
+Test-MockModule
+Test-MockObject
+'text
+'th
+Thalhammer
+TheModule
+Timeline
+'title
+TMTOWTDI
+to_address
+Torry
+tr
+Tregar
+txt
+'type
+typeglobs
+'u
+uc
+uid
+uncomplex
+undef
+ungreedy
+Ungreedy
+'up
+update_sum
+uppercase
+'url
+user_name
+use_strict
+usr
+v1
+v1_ref
+v2
+v2_ref
+var
+vars
+VCS
+VCSes
+vector_sum
+verne
+'version
+wallclock
+washington
+wc
+wget
+whence_for
+which_counter
+whitespace
+whitespace-delimited
+Win32-GuiTest
+WinZip
+write_text
+wstat
+Wstat
+'x
+X11-GUITest
+xDD
+x-euc-jp-unicode
+XM
+XML-Parser-2
+XS
+x-sjis-cp932
+-xvf
+xy
+'y
+yml
+Zilla
+ב-extends
+ב-Moose
+ב-POD
+ב-XS
+ה-CPAN
+הסולמית-TEST
+כ-TODO
+ל-21
+ל-Module-Build
+ש-Module-Starter

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/1/src/arrays/functions.html.wml

 
 <p>
 The syntax is <tt>join($separator, @array)</tt> and what it does is
-concatenates the elements of <tt>@array</tt> while putting <tt>$seperator</tt> in
+concatenates the elements of <tt>@array</tt> while putting <tt>$separator</tt> in
 between. Here's an example:
 </p>
 

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/1/src/while/last_and_next.html.wml

 
 <p>
 By default, <tt>last</tt> and <tt>next</tt> operate on the most innermost loop.
-However, the loop to which they relate can be controlled by labeling
+However, the loop to which they relate can be controlled by labelling
 the requested loop and specifying this label as a parameter to <tt>last</tt>
 or <tt>next</tt>.
 </p>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/1/src/while/pyramid1.pl

-print "Please enter the length of the pyramide:\n";
+print "Please enter the length of the pyramid:\n";
 $size = <>;
 chomp($size);
 

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/2/src/debugger/breakpoints.html.wml

 
 <p>
 When the user places a breakpoint on a certain line in a program, they
-insruct the debugger to stop the execution of the program when this line is
+instruct the debugger to stop the execution of the program when this line is
 reached. Then, one can cause the program to run freely using the continue
 command, and have it stop only at this line.
 </p>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/2/src/debugger/perl_cmds.html.wml

 
 <p>
 One special command that is also useful is <tt>x</tt>. <tt>x $var</tt>
-displays <tt>$var</tt> in a hierarchial manner, which is very useful for
+displays <tt>$var</tt> in a hierarchical manner, which is very useful for
 lists of lists etc. The <b>Data::Dumper</b> module which is available from
 <a href="http://www.cpan.org/">CPAN</a> offers a similar functionality, from
 within your perl programs.

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/2/src/files/index.html.wml

 reading or writing (or both), do with it what you want, and then close it.
 In Perl, filehandles implemented as the so-called <tt>globs</tt> are placed on
 a separate namespace than that of the  variables. It is generally marked with
-a starting asterik (<tt>*</tt>), which can be omitted if the first letter is a
+a starting asterisk (<tt>*</tt>), which can be omitted if the first letter is a
 capital one.
 </p>
 
 </td>
 <td>
 Appending (the file pointer will start at the end and the file will not be
-overriden)
+overridden)
 </td>
 </tr>
 

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/2/src/for/whence_for.html.wml

 </p>
 
 <p>
-A subtantial difference between the notation
+A substantial difference between the notation
 <tt>for($i=0 ; $i&lt;$limit ; $i++)</tt> and between
 <tt>for $i (0 .. ($limit-1))</tt> is that the first accommodates
 itself to changes in <tt>$limit</tt>, while the second will iterate for a

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/2/src/functions/recursion.html.wml

 </p>
 
 <p>
-Secondly, some systems (such as Microsft Windows) limit an executable to a
-certain amount of stack, as far as such langauges as Assembler or C are
+Secondly, some systems (such as Microsoft Windows) limit an executable to a
+certain amount of stack, as far as such languages as Assembler or C are
 concerned. This should not be of any concern to perl hackers, because the
 perl interpreter does not translate a perl function call into a C function
 call. (not to mention that the perl interpreter on those systems is compiled

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/2/src/references/dereferencing.html.wml

 
 <p>
 The entire scalar or data structure pointed to by the reference can be
-retrieved by dereferncing. Dereferencing is done by using a <tt>$</tt>,
+retrieved by dereferencing. Dereferencing is done by using a <tt>$</tt>,
 a <tt>@</tt> or a <tt>%</tt> (depending if the reference refers to a scalar
 , array or a hash respectively), and then the reference inside curly braces.
 </p>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/2/src/references/hanoi.pl

     move_column($source, $intermediate, $how_many-1);
     # Print the current state
     print_towers();
-    # Move one disk. Notice the dereferncing of the arrays
+    # Move one disk. Notice the dereferencing of the arrays
     # using @{$ref}.
     push @{$towers[$dest]}, pop(@{$towers[$source]});
     move_column($intermediate, $dest, $how_many-1);

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/2/src/regexps/asterisk.html.wml

 
 <p>
 In order to repeat a character more than one time, several repetition
-paterns can be used. The asterisk (<tt>*</tt>) can be used to indicate that
+patterns can be used. The asterisk (<tt>*</tt>) can be used to indicate that
 the character should repeat zero or more times. The plus sign (<tt>+</tt>)
 can be used to indicate that the character should repeat one or more
 times. As for the question mark (<tt>?</tt>) it indicates an appearance of

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/2/src/regexps/flags.html.wml

 </p>
 
 <p>
-A <tt>g</tt> causes the match or substitution to match <b>all</b> occurences,
+A <tt>g</tt> causes the match or substitution to match <b>all</b> occurrences,
 not just one. If used with a match in an array context
-(e.g: <tt>@occurences = ($string =~ /$regexp/g);</tt>) it retrieves all
+(e.g: <tt>@occurrences = ($string =~ /$regexp/g);</tt>) it retrieves all
 the matches and if used with a substitution it substitutes all the
-occurences with the string.
+occurrences with the string.
 </p>
 
 <p>
-This example replaces all the occurences of the word "hello" by the index of
-their occurence:
+This example replaces all the occurrences of the word "hello" by the index of
+their occurrence:
 </p>
 
 <quadpres_code_block>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/2/src/regexps/index.html.wml

 Retrieve various captures out of it.
 </li>
 <li>
-Retrieve all of its occurences.
+Retrieve all of its occurrences.
 </li>
 <li>
-Substitute the first occurence or all of its occurences with some other string
+Substitute the first occurrence or all of its occurrences with some other string
 or (perl) expression.
 </li>
 </ol>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/2/src/regexps/substitute/index.html.wml

 
 
 <p>
-One can use regular expression to substitute an occurence
+One can use regular expression to substitute an occurrence
 of a regular expression found inside a string to something else. The operator
 used for this is <tt>s/$exp_to_search/$exp_to_subs_for/</tt>. The following
 simple program replaces a number with the string "Some Number":
 </quadpres_code_block>
 
 <p>
-Notice that in this case, only the first occurence of the string will be
+Notice that in this case, only the first occurrence of the string will be
 substituted. The <tt>g</tt> switch which will be covered soon, enables us to
-substitute <b>all</b> of the occurences.
+substitute <b>all</b> of the occurrences.
 </p>
 
 <p>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/3/Contents.pm

                             [
                                 {
                                     'url' => "super.html",
-                                    'title' => "Calling Overriden Methods of Base Classes",
+                                    'title' => "Calling Overridden Methods of Base Classes",
                                 },
                             ],
                         },

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/3/src/intro/refs_to_funcs.html.wml

 <p>
 In perl it is possible to define dynamic subroutines, inside the code of
 the current scope. That scope can be a function or even another dynamic
-subroutine. These subroutines, which are sometimes refered to as closures,
+subroutine. These subroutines, which are sometimes referred to as closures,
 can see all the variables of the scope in which they were declared, even
 after the function that created them stopped running.
 </p>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/3/src/objects/making/inheritance/super.html.wml

 
 <p>
 It is possible to explicitly call the method of a base class even if it
-was over-riden by another method in the derived class. To do that use
+was overridden by another method in the derived class. To do that use
 the <tt>SUPER::</tt> prefix before the method name.
 </p>
 

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/3/src/objects/utils.html.wml

 
 
 <p>
-<tt>isa()</tt> is a special method that is accasible in every object. When
+<tt>isa()</tt> is a special method that can be used on every object. When
 invoked with the name of a package as an argument, it returns whether
 or not this object inherits from this package (directly or indirectly).
 </p>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/4/src/exceptions/index.html.wml

 #include 'template.wml'
 
 <p>
-Exceptions are a mechanism to raise an error in a program which will propogate
+Exceptions are a mechanism to raise an error in a program which will propagate
 to outside blocks, until it is caught by an explicit catching block, or
 it terminates the program. It is a convenient way to manage errors.
 </p>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/4/src/sprintf/index.html.wml

 
 <p>
 The <tt>sprintf</tt> built-in function can be used to translate a format
-string with some conversions embedded inside, and some paramters into a
+string with some conversions embedded inside, and some parameters into a
 formatted string. Each conversion is specified by the starting character of the
 percent sign (<tt>%</tt>), and can have a type and several parameters that will
 dictate how it will be formatted in the output string. The output string is

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/4/src/string-forms/here_doc.html.wml

 <p>
 An unquoted ending string causes the here-doc to interpolate, in case
 you encounter it in the wild. Note however, that in your code, you should
-always qoute it, so people won't have to guess what you meant.
+always quote it, so people won't have to guess what you meant.
 </p>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/4/src/system-funcs/file-tests.html.wml

 Perl provides several file tests that can be used to test a filehandle
 or filename for various conditions. <tt>-e filename</tt> determines if
 <tt>filename</tt> exists. <tt>-r</tt> determines if the file is readable,
-<tt>-w</tt> if it's writable, <tt>-x</tt> if it is executable and so on.
+<tt>-w</tt> if it's writeable, <tt>-x</tt> if it is executable and so on.
 </p>
 
 <p>
-<tt>-d</tt> determines if the file is  adirectory, and <tt>-f</tt> if it's
+<tt>-d</tt> determines if the file is a directory, and <tt>-f</tt> if it's
 a plain file. For a list of other file tests and their use consult
 <tt>perldoc -f -X</tt>.
 </p>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/4/src/system-funcs/r.pl

 
 use Fcntl;
 
-my $filename = shifg;
+my $filename = shift;
 
 open F, "+<$filename"
     or die "Could not open file";
 read(F,$text,64);
 # Do the actual rot13'ing with the tr command
 $text =~ tr/A-Za-z/N-ZA-Mn-za-m/;
-# Write them at poisition 64
+# Write them at position 64
 seek(F, 64, SEEK_SET);
 print F $text
 close(F);

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/4/src/system-funcs/rot13.pl

 read(F,$text,64);
 # Do the actual rot13'ing with the tr command
 $text =~ tr/A-Za-z/N-ZA-Mn-za-m/;
-# Write them at poisition 64
+# Write them at position 64
 seek(F, 64, SEEK_SET);
 print F $text;
 close(F);

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/5/src/accessors/cpan-modules.html.wml

 <p>
 Class-XSAccessor is an accessor generator partially written using C and Perl/XS
 which is the Perl external subroutine mechanism. As such, it provides an
-unparalled speed among the other accessor generators, and is even faster than
+unparalleled speed among the other accessor generators, and is even faster than
 writing your own accessor methods by hand, like we did in the example.
 </p>
 

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/5/src/accessors/test-person.pl

 $shlomif->greet();
 $shlomif->increment_age();
 
-print "Happy Birhday, Shlomi, your age is now ", $shlomif->get_age(), ".\n";
+print "Happy Birthday, Shlomi, your age is now ", $shlomif->get_age(), ".\n";
 
 my $newton =
     Person->new(

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/5/src/conclusion/thanks.html.wml

 <p>
 chromatic for his
 <a href="http://www.modernperlbooks.com/">“Modern Perl”</a> blog
-and book (freely available online with sources), which further fueled interest
+and book (freely available online with sources), which further fuelled interest
 in a more modern approach to Perl programming.
 </p>
 </li>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/5/src/local-keyword/use-and-abuse.html.wml

 </li>
 
 <li>
-<a href="http://perl.plover.com/local.html">"Sevel Useful Uses of
+<a href="http://perl.plover.com/local.html">"Seven Useful Uses of
 <tt>local</tt>"</a> - also by Mark Jason Dominus.
 </li>
 

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/5/src/module-build-and-starter/additional-resources.html.wml

 <p>
 Jeffrey Thalhammer has prepared a talk titled
 <a href="http://www.slideshare.net/thaljef/cpan-for-private-code">“CPAN for Private Code”</a> which gives the motivation for packaging Perl code in CPAN-like
-distributions, even if it is not indended for CPAN.
+distributions, even if it is not intended for CPAN.
 </p>
 </li>
 

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/5/src/module-build-and-starter/coding.html.wml

 <p>
 If we look at the code of the <tt>lib/…*.pm</tt> file, we'll see that there's
 practically nothing there. So now it's time that we add some meaningful
-code to the modulesmodules. But first we need to add some tests. Let's add this
+code to the modules. But first we need to add some tests. Let's add this
 test script under <tt>t/add.t</tt>
 </p>
 

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/5/src/new-features/use-base.html.wml

 </p>
 
 <p>
-<a href="http://search.cpan.org/dist/parent/">The parent pragama</a>
+<a href="http://search.cpan.org/dist/parent/">The parent pragma</a>
 forked from base.pm to "remove the cruft that accumulated there". It may
-be prefarable.
+be preferable.
 </p>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/5/src/pod-documentation/extensions.html.wml

 <p>
 <a href="http://search.cpan.org/dist/Perldoc/">Perldoc.pm</a> was an attempt
 to modernise POD by
-<a href="http://search.cpan.org/~ingy/">Ingy döt Net</a>, and incoroporating
+<a href="http://search.cpan.org/~ingy/">Ingy döt Net</a>, and incorporating
 some markup from his Kwiki wiki engine.
 </p>
 </li>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/5/src/testing/demo/test-more.html.wml

 <p>
 <tt>is()</tt> is a Test-More built-in that compares a received result ("have")
 to an expected result ("want") for exact equivalence. There are also
-<tt>ok()</tt>, which just tests for truthhood, <tt>is_deeply()</tt> which
+<tt>ok()</tt>, which just tests for truth-hood, <tt>is_deeply()</tt> which
 performs a deep comparison of nested data structures, and others.
 </p>
 

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/5/src/testing/types.html.wml

 automated tests. First of all, <b>unit tests</b> (also see
 <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_testing">the Wikipedia article</a>)
 test only a single "unit" of the code (say a module or a class), to
-see if it behaves as expected. They generaly make sure that the behaviour
+see if it behaves as expected. They generally make sure that the behaviour
 of the module is sane and desirable, while not trying to see if it works
 as part of the larger scheme.
 </p>
 On the other hand, <b>system tests</b> test the entire system. For example,
 if we're writing code to generate a web-site, we could test that the various
 pages of the resultant site contain some of the qualities that we expect.
-System tests tests the system as a whole, to see if there'e a bug somewhere.
+System tests tests the system as a whole, to see if there's a bug somewhere.
 </p>
 
 <p>

lib/presentations/qp/perl-for-newbies/5/src/version-control/mercurial-demo.html.wml

 </quadpres_code_block>
 
 <p>
-Now the file is scheduled to be commited (note the <tt>A</tt>). Let's
+Now the file is scheduled to be committed (note the <tt>A</tt>). Let's
 commit it:
 </p>
 
 </quadpres_code_block>
 
 <p>
-And it's commited.
+And it's committed.
 </p>
 
 <p>

lib/presentations/qp/welcome-to-linux/Development/src/valgrind/more.html.wml

 Inappropriate deallocation function.
 </li>
 <li>
-Passing system call paramters with inadequate read/write permissions.
+Passing system call parameters with inadequate read/write permissions.
 </li>
 </ul>
 </li>

lib/presentations/qp/welcome-to-linux/Technion/src/valgrind/more.html.wml

 Inappropriate deallocation function.
 </li>
 <li>
-Passing system call paramters with inadequate read/write permissions.
+Passing system call parameters with inadequate read/write permissions.
 </li>
 </ul>
 </li>

lib/presentations/spork/Vim/beginners/Spork.slides.source

 ----
 == Parameterised Movements:
 
-* |/[Regexp]| - Go to the next occurence of the (Vim) regular expression [Regexp]
-+* |?[Regexp]| - Previous occurence of regexp.
+* |/[Regexp]| - Go to the next occurrence of the (Vim) regular expression [Regexp]
++* |?[Regexp]| - Previous occurrence of regexp.
 +** Use |n| and |N| to move to the next or previous matches.
 
-+* |f[Char]| - the next occurence of |[Char]| on the current line.
-+* |F[Char]| - previous occurence
-+* |t[Char]| - one character before the next occurence
++* |f[Char]| - the next occurrence of |[Char]| on the current line.
++* |F[Char]| - previous occurrence
++* |t[Char]| - one character before the next occurrence
 +* |T[Char]| - previous one character.
 ----
 == Ranges

t2/lecture/Freecell-Solver/Summary-deprecated.txt

 library can be run we are set. But what about multi-threaded applications?
 
 ** I decided to create an instance structure that will be passed as the first
-    paramters to solve_for_state() and check_and_add_state(). That way, more
+    parameters to solve_for_state() and check_and_add_state(). That way, more
     than one simultaenous instances can be run at any given time.
 
 ** I moved prev_states, indirect_prev_states, num_prev_states, etc. to the

t2/lecture/PostgreSQL-Lecture/using_transactions.html

 </pre>
 <h3>* Changes that are made during the transaction are visible to
 queries within the transaction. Yet, they only become visible to
-the outside world, after the transaction was commited.<br /></h3>
+the outside world, after the transaction was committed.<br /></h3>
 </body>
 </html>

t2/me/intros/writers/index.html.wml

 </p>
 
 <p>
-There was a time, I actually prefered using Windows 98 for most day to day
+There was a time, I actually preferred using Windows 98 for most day to day
 use (but not development), because I found it more convenient. After KDE 2.x
 was released, I found that working on Linux was considerably more enjoyable,
 and now use it for everything, including most tasks I used Windows for. While,

t2/no-ie/index.html.wml

 Initiative</a> (06-October-2008)
 </li>
 <li>
-<a href="http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/advisory/961051.mspx">Microsft
+<a href="http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/advisory/961051.mspx">Microspoft
 Security Advisory (961051) - “Vulnerability in Internet Explorer Could Allow Remote Code Execution”</a> (12-December-2008)<br />
 <ul>
 <li>

t2/open-source/bits.html.wml

 This command line Ruby script sets the names (and number) of the
 Xfce desktop’s <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_desktop">virtual
 workspaces (also known as virtual desktop</a>. You can simply pass the names
-as arguments in the command line (possibly inside qoutes).
+as arguments in the command line (possibly inside quotes).
 </p>
 
 <p>

t2/open-source/contributions/index.html.wml

 one of the Freecell Pro core developers and current maintainer,
 <a href="$(ROOT)/open-source/interviews/adrian-ettlinger.html">Adrian
 Ettlinger</a>. Adrian was eager to incorporate my solver as well, and we
-cooperated on incoroporating it.
+cooperated on incorporating it.
 </p>
 
 <p>

t2/philosophy/computers/open-source/gpl-bsd-and-suckerism/index.html.wml

 
 <p>
 If people will produce more code (or documentation or graphics or whatever)
-instead of labeling other people that are also passionately working on code,
+instead of labelling other people that are also passionately working on code,
 just because of its choice of licensing, the world will turn around a great
 deal faster. So until then, hack on!
 </p>

t2/puzzles/logic/tip-of-the-sword/index.html.wml

 
 <p>
 Now let’s assume that the sword given as a present by the king is in the
-mid-right poisition. In this case, the sword found in the pirate ship must be
+mid-right position. In this case, the sword found in the pirate ship must be
 in the centre position, and the scimitar will be in the mid-left position. So
 we get:
 </p>
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