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lib/docbook/5/xml/dealing-with-hypomanias.xml

+<?xml version='1.0' encoding='utf-8'?>
+<?xml-stylesheet href="docbook-css/driver.css" type="text/css"?>
+
+<article xmlns="http://docbook.org/ns/docbook" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" version="5.0" xml:id="index" xml:lang="en">
+    <info>
+        <title>Dealing with Hypomanias</title>
+        <authorgroup>
+            <author>
+                <personname>
+                    <firstname>Shlomi</firstname>
+                    <surname>Fish</surname>
+                </personname>
+                <affiliation>
+                    <address>
+                        <email>shlomif@iglu.org.il</email>
+                        <uri type="homepage" xlink:href="http://www.shlomifish.org/">Shlomi Fish's Homepage</uri>
+                    </address>
+                </affiliation>
+            </author>
+         </authorgroup>
+         <copyright>
+             <year>2008</year>
+            <holder>Shlomi Fish</holder>
+        </copyright>
+      <legalnotice xml:id="main_legal_notice">
+            <para>
+<!--Creative Commons License-->
+This work is licensed under the <link xlink:href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/">Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License</link> (or at your option a greater version of it).
+		<!--/Creative Commons License--><!-- <rdf:RDF xmlns="http://web.resource.org/cc/" xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/" xmlns:rdf="http://www.w3.org/1999/02/22-rdf-syntax-ns#">
+		<Work rdf:about="">
+			<license rdf:resource="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/" />
+	<dc:title>The Case for File Swapping</dc:title>
+	<dc:date>2005</dc:date>
+	<dc:description>An essay that explains why Internet File Swapping (using Peer-to-Peer networks, etc.) is not only moral and ethical, but also should be legal, and cannot be banned. Discusses other issues.</dc:description>
+	<dc:creator><Agent><dc:title>Shlomi Fish</dc:title></Agent></dc:creator>
+	<dc:rights><Agent><dc:title>Shlomi Fish</dc:title></Agent></dc:rights>
+	<dc:type rdf:resource="http://purl.org/dc/dcmitype/Text" />
+		</Work>
+		<License rdf:about="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/"><permits rdf:resource="http://web.resource.org/cc/Reproduction"/><permits rdf:resource="http://web.resource.org/cc/Distribution"/><requires rdf:resource="http://web.resource.org/cc/Notice"/><requires rdf:resource="http://web.resource.org/cc/Attribution"/><permits rdf:resource="http://web.resource.org/cc/DerivativeWorks"/></License></rdf:RDF> -->                
+            </para>
+        </legalnotice>
+        <abstract>
+            <para>
+                I'll discuss some of my experience as a person with Bipolar
+                Disorder (or Mania-Depressia), and how I deal with the various
+                periods of "hypomania": periods of strong excitement and 
+                feelings of self-grandioisity.
+            </para> 
+        </abstract>
+
+        <revhistory>
+            <revision>
+                <revnumber>5389</revnumber>
+                <date>30 May 2008</date>
+                <authorinitials>shlomif</authorinitials>
+                <revremark>
+                    Forked the template from a previous work and working on 
+                    it.
+                </revremark>
+            </revision>
+        </revhistory>
+    </info>
+
+<section xml:id="introduction">
+    <info>
+        <title>Introduction</title>
+    </info>
+
+    <!-- TODO : Rephrase -->
+
+    <para>
+        Have you ever entered a mood where you thought you were a bad person,
+        that all your past achievements did not count and were bad? Did you
+        find it difficult to perform many tasks that you could do normally,
+        found it hard to concentrate, was flooded with bad thoughts, and had
+        problems going to sleep? If so, you may have been
+        <link xlink:href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Major_depressive_disorder">clinically
+            depressed</link>, or clinically anxious. In addition, people who
+        suffer from <link
+            xlink:href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bipolar_disorder">Mania-Depressia
+        also known as "Bipolar disorder"</link>
+        (like me) also tend to get into opposite states called 
+        <link xlink:href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypomania">hypomanias</link>
+        or Manias. While "hypomania" contains the word "mania", they
+        are actually below mania, and the person is still in control to some
+        extent, and, with some awareness, may realise he's in a bad mental
+        condition.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
+        Clinical depressions are not everyday "I am depressed."
+        or "being down" depressions, but rather a feeling that one is bad, and 
+        being consumed with guilt, with a tendency of being less communicative
+        and less able to perform one's responsibilities.
+    </para>
+    
+    <para>
+        
+        (or "Bipolar disorder") because I had a
+        single "Great Mania" and a few shorter manias, because I have frequent
+        Hypomanias, and because I have been clinically depressed or clinically
+        anxious at the time. So I'm writing about this from experience.
+    </para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section xml:id="symptoms">
+    <info>
+        <title>Symptoms</title>
+    </info>
+    <section xml:id="symptoms-of-depression">
+        <info>
+            <title>Symptoms of Depression</title>
+        </info>
+        <para>
+            Quoting from <link xlink:href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinical_depression">the 
+                Wikipedia</link>, the symptoms of depression are:
+        </para>
+
+        <blockquote>
+            <itemizedlist>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Persistent sad, anxious or "empty" mood 
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Loss of appetite and/or weight loss or conversely overeating and weight gain 
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Insomnia, early morning awakening, or oversleeping 
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Restlessness or irritability
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Psychomotor agitation or psychomotor retardation
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Feelings of worthlessness, inappropriate guilt, helplessness
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Feelings of hopelessness, pessimism 
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Difficulty thinking, concentrating, remembering or making decisions
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Thoughts of [[death]] or suicide or attempts at suicide
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Loss of interest or pleasure in hobbies and activities that were once enjoyed
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Withdrawal from social situations, family and friends
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Decreased energy, fatigue, feeling "slowed down" or sluggish
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Persistent physical symptoms that do not respond to treatment, such as headaches, digestive problems, and chronic pain
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+                <listitem>
+                    <para>
+                        Decrease/Feeling in motor-speed (time seems to slow down)
+                    </para>
+                </listitem>
+            </itemizedlist>
+        </blockquote>
+
+        <para>
+            These are mostly the external symptoms. While the exact thoughts
+            differ from person to person, here is how I felt:
+        </para>
+
+        <itemizedlist>
+            <listitem>
+                <para>
+                    I felt I was bad and evil. That I was a bad person, having a 
+                    bad influence on the world, and that "God hated me".
+                </para>
+            </listitem>
+            <listitem>
+                <para>
+                    I felt this was my true state, and that my happy, capable, 
+                    intelligent and active state was due to "a pact with the 
+                    devil" or something along these lines.
+                </para>
+            </listitem>
+            <listitem><para>I found that the thoughts haunted me, that I couldn't really sleep, and
+was afraid of thinking.</para></listitem>
+
+
+<listitem><para>I believed the entire world was bad and kept perceiving everything as bad.</para></listitem>
+
+<listitem><para>I had trouble communicating with others, and was afraid to tell them how
+I felt.</para></listitem>
+
+<listitem>
+    <para>
+I found it harder to do things that I normally find easy to do. For example,
+I spent hours on end solving a single math problem. I kept convincing myself
+that it should be easy which made me feel much worse.
+</para>
+</listitem>
+
+<listitem>
+    <para>
+I was consumed and overwhelmed with guilt. I felt guilty for many things
+that I perceived as wrong.
+</para>
+</listitem>
+</itemizedlist>
+
+    </section>
+    <section xml:id="symptoms-of-hypomanias">
+        <info>
+            <title>Symptoms of Hypomanias</title>
+        </info>
+        <para>
+            In regards to hypomanias, Wikipedia <link xlink:href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypomania">gives the following symptoms</link>:
+        </para>
+
+        <itemizedlist>
+<listitem>
+    <para>
+        Pressured speech; rapid talking
+    </para>
+</listitem>
+<listitem>
+    <para>
+        Inflated self-esteem or grandiosity;
+    </para>
+</listitem>
+<listitem>
+    <para>
+        Decreased need for sleep;
+    </para>
+</listitem>
+<listitem>
+    <para>
+        Flight of ideas or the subjective experience that thoughts are racing; 
+    </para>
+</listitem>
+<listitem>
+    <para>
+        Easy distractibility and attention-deficit (superficially similar to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder);
+    </para>
+</listitem>
+<listitem>
+    <para>
+        Increase in psychomotor agitation; and
+    </para>
+</listitem>
+<listitem>
+    <para>
+        Steep involvement in pleasurable activities that may have a high potential for negative psycho-social or physical consequences.
+    </para>
+</listitem>
+        </itemizedlist>
+        <para>
+            It's a pretty good description of me when I'm hypomanic.
+        </para>
+    </section>
+</section>
+<section xml:id="depressed-people-i-know">
+        <info>
+            <title>People I Know who Suffer from Depressions</title>
+        </info>
+    <para>
+        Many people (mostly computer developers) I've talked with admitted to 
+        have been clinically depressed:
+    </para>
+    <itemizedlist>
+        <listitem>
+            <para>
+                One of my best friends has admitted that she used to have many 
+                depressions. Whenever I met her in real life, or talked with 
+                her (on the phone, on instant messaging, etc) she seemed very 
+                cheerful, fun loving, intelligent, and rational.
+            </para>
+
+            <para>
+                She claimed that when she is depressed she tends not to
+                communicate a lot and also cannot achieve too much at work,
+                which she said only makes her feel worse. I can relate to both
+                of these, as I recall that that was the case for me on both
+                accounts when I was depressed.
+            </para>
+
+        </listitem>
+
+        <listitem>
+
+            <para>
+                I talked with a programmer, well into his 50's (and still
+                active) who admitted to having got into depressions several
+                times in the past. He again seemed normal (if somewhat
+                eccentric to me).
+            </para>
+
+        </listitem>
+
+        <listitem>
+
+            <para>
+                One time on irc.oftc.net someone joined and started speaking 
+                in
+                <link xlink:href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leet">l33t-speak</link>, 
+                asking how he can become a "haxor". People thought he
+                was a troll, but I ended up PMing him and it turned out he was
+                depressed. I spent the afternoon trying to help him.
+                Eventually, during his (and mine's) evening, he claimed that 
+                he was feeling better and parted. (It is known that often 
+                depressed individuals feel better in the evening and at night.)
+            </para>
+
+        </listitem>
+
+        <listitem>
+
+            <para>
+                A fellow programmer I talked with admitted to having got into 
+                depressions in the past, and that she tried to function 
+                despite that.
+            </para>
+
+        </listitem>
+
+        <listitem>
+
+            <para>
+                A fellow Perl monger I talked with said that he sometimes 
+                exhibited some of the symptoms of hypomania. He seemed 
+                very hyperactive to me, so I wasn't really surprised, but it 
+                may also be plain excitement and not a medical condition.
+            </para>
+
+        </listitem>
+        
+    </itemizedlist>
+
+    <para>
+        <link xlink:href="http://www.mental-health-today.com/bp/famous_people.htm">A 
+            list of some famous people who had Mania-Depressia can be
+            found at 
+            http://www.mental-health-today.com/bp/famous_people.htm</link>.
+        Bipolar disorder is relatively uncommon and many more people are 
+        only "Unipolar" and only have depressions and anxieties. Depressions 
+        and anxieties are considered the "common cold" of mental illnesses, 
+        and are exhibited in a large percentage of the populace.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>        
+Someone told me that he read a study that said that roughly 50% of the
+authors in the English language today have Mania-Depressia. I haven't been
+able to find it online and would appreciate any references.
+    </para>
+
+</section>
+<section xml:id="dealing-with-clinical-depressions">
+        <info>
+            <title>Dealing with Clinical Depressions</title>
+        </info>
+
+    <para>
+There is a lot of mis-information and dis-information about depressions in
+the public. When I was depressed and hypomanic as a teenager I didn't know
+how to call these "conditions", or how to effectively deal with them. If,
+after reading the description on the Wikipedia, you feel that you have been
+depressed in the past, read on.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+The best advice I can give on dealing with clinical depressions (and possibly
+also as a preventitive measure or just to understand what people think) is
+to buy <link xlink:href="http://www.amazon.com/Feeling-Good-Therapy-Revised-Updated/dp/0380810336">the excellent book "Feeling Good"</link>.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+    It is a self-help guide for <link xlink:href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_behavioral_therapy">cognitive-behavioural therapy</link>, that was
+originally written in English and was recommended to me by my therapist.
+Just reading it helped me understand the source of my hypomanias, and I found
+the exercises recommended there to be helpful as well.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+One important omission from an earlier draft of this essay was that I did not
+summarise the "Feeling Good" book here, while I should have tried to in order
+to give a taste of the book here (because I know I always hate "go read X at
+some place because I don't have the nerve to explain it to you."). So I am going
+to summarise "Feeling Good" here.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Note that if you are depressed, (and if you're feeling suicidal even more so),
+you need to consult a cognitive-behavioural therapist for a session, as
+soon as possible. I am not a mental health professional and am not qualified 
+to give professional therapy, and this essay is not a substitute for it.
+</para>
+
+<section xml:id="summary_of_feeling_good">
+        <info>
+            <title>Summary of Feeling Good</title>
+        </info>
+
+<para>
+Burns starts by giving a way to diagnose your mood and determine if you are
+depressed or not. I didn't focus on it because I normally can eventually tell
+when I'm hypomanic (or could when I was depressed). He then goes on to explain
+that your feelings are affected by the thoughts that go through your head,
+and that by challenging your irrational thoughts, you can improve your
+mood. 
+</para>
+
+<para>
+He then lists 10 cognitive errors that people make which may make people
+depressed. Among these errors are:
+</para>
+
+<orderedlist>
+
+<listitem>
+<para>
+<emphasis role="bold">Should statements</emphasis> - you try to motivate
+yourself by saying things like "I should be more careful", or "I should not 
+have talked to him like that." or "I ought to be more considered". What these
+should statements do is actually demotivate, and make you feel down.
+</para>
+</listitem>
+
+<listitem>
+<para>
+<emphasis role="bold">Disqualifying the positive</emphasis> - an example for
+this is that when you receive a compliment, you say something like "they
+didn't mean it.", or "it doesn't count.", or "he doesn't know the real me."
+</para>
+</listitem>
+
+<listitem>
+<para>
+<emphasis role="bold">Mental filter</emphasis> - here you focus on one negative
+detail (a "fly in the ointment"), while ignoring the rest of the picture.
+</para>
+</listitem>
+
+<listitem>
+<para>
+<emphasis role="bold">All or nothing thinking</emphasis> - you want everything
+to be perfect. For example, you'll accept no grade below 90% or so (even if
+it's a passing grade), or so.
+</para>
+</listitem>
+
+</orderedlist>
+
+<para>
+Dr. Burns then gives a simple recipe to gain self-esteem: one writes down an
+automatic thought that disturbes him (or her), and then the feelings that
+he feels (with percentages). Afterwards, he should write which cognitive
+errors he has made followed by a rational response to the feelings, and after
+that the new feelings. 
+</para>
+
+<para>
+Burns then discusses several useful techniques for anger management, and for
+dealing with criticism.
+</para>
+
+<orderedlist>
+
+    <listitem>
+        <para>
+            <emphasis role="bold">Approval Addiction.</emphasis>
+        </para>
+</listitem>
+
+<listitem>
+    <para>
+<emphasis role="bold">Productivity Addiction</emphasis> - you care about your work, how productive you are,
+how much you achieve, etc. (Much more common among men.)
+</para>
+</listitem>
+
+<listitem>
+    <para>
+        <emphasis role="bold">Love addiction</emphasis> - you want to be loved a lot. More common among women.
+        </para>
+</listitem>
+
+<listitem>
+    <para>
+        <emphasis role="bold">Perfectionism</emphasis> - you want to be perfect in everything you do.
+        </para>
+</listitem>
+
+</orderedlist>
+
+</section>
+</section>
+
+<section xml:id="few-facts-to-realise">
+        <info>
+            <title>A Few Facts that Should Be Realised</title>
+        </info>
+    <section xml:id="mentally-ill-is-not-eccentric">
+        <info>
+            <title>Mentally Ill is not Eccentric</title>
+        </info>
+
+        <para>
+            When people say that someone is "crazy", "insane", "out of his 
+            mind" etc. they usually mean that he or she is eccentric or 
+            behaving irrationaly, not that they are mentally unsound. I know 
+            and have heard about many people who are eccentric or very 
+            eccentric and yet are perfectly sane, and lead perfectly happy 
+            lives.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            There's a difference between conformism or "being normal" and 
+            mental health. 
+        </para>
+
+    </section>
+
+    <section xml:id="some-bad-moods-are-ok">
+        <info>
+            <title>Some Bad Moods are OK</title>
+        </info>
+
+        <para>
+            Some bad moods are normal and are a healthy part of living and
+            would not lead to depression. For example, if someone you cared
+            about died, it's perfectly OK to feel sad. Rational fear is also
+            normal and healthy. (but one should avoid irrational fear). My
+            point is that one cannot or should not be happy all the time.
+            Sometimes it is also OK to be a little "down".
+        </para>
+
+    </section>
+
+    <section xml:id="drugs">
+        <info>
+            <title>Drugs are not the most Effective 
+                Way to Treat Depressions</title>
+        </info>
+
+        <para>
+            Depressions have a cause. According to
+            <link xlink:href="http://www.amazon.com/Feeling-Good-Therapy-Revised-Updated/dp/0380810336">"Feeling 
+                Good"</link> it is
+            usually a thought or a group of thoughts that is bothering someone,
+            and caused someone to feel depressed. Psychoactive medication aims
+            to deal with the symptom that is a chemical problem in the
+            functioning of the brain. However, it does not deal with the actual
+            cause that is the mental problem.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            In order to deal with the cause instead of the symptom, you still 
+            need Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy and to read
+            <link xlink:href="http://www.amazon.com/Feeling-Good-Therapy-Revised-Updated/dp/0380810336">"Feeling
+                Good"</link>.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            That put aside I should note that I am taking medication,
+            prescribed to me by a Psychiatrist. It does not prevent me from
+            becoming anxious, but it may make the anxieties less severe (I'm
+            not entirely sure about that).
+        </para>
+
+    </section>
+
+    <section xml:id="depressions-are-not-desirable">
+        <info>
+            <title>Clinical Depressions are neither Desirable nor 
+                Inevitable and Can be Overcome</title>
+        </info>
+
+        <para>
+            Some unipolar individuals I talked with, who seemed to have been
+            somewhat
+            <link xlink:href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativism">relativists</link>
+            argued that being clinically depressed or hypomanic, was perfectly
+            OK and that it was just a natural state, and that it was just
+            "society" or the "environment" that didn't like it. All of this
+            is non-sense, because I clearly recall feeling miserable when
+            being depressed or clinically anxious and after gaining some
+            awareness, was able to tell that my hypomanias were not desirable
+            either. It's not a belief people have conditioned me to believe,
+            it's one that I developed myself. 
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            I can rant much more about Post-modernist relativism, whose
+            some of proponents of it claimed people with disabilities such as
+            deafness or blindness, who can be treated to some extent,
+            should not be, because deafness or blindness were just different
+            ways of perception, and not actual disabilities. But the point
+            is that while you may experience depression or hypomania, it is
+            neither desirable nor inevitable, and that you can overcome it.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            During my normal state, I had, like other people, experienced 
+            many positive and negative emotions: joy, anger, frustration,
+            fear, boredom, disorientedness, love, exhiliration, attraction,
+            disappointment, hatred, remorse, sadness, etc. This is perfectly 
+            normal and these emotions have a purpose, and I was otherwise
+            happy when I experienced them. But they are more natural than
+            depression, which is much longer, and is mentally and physically
+            unhealthy. <footnote xml:id="emotions-are-not-our-master" label="Emotions">
+                <para>
+                    One should note that emotions and feelings should not be 
+                    our master. Often they can be misleading and irrational.
+                    For example, if my friend failed a test that I did well
+                    on, I may feel smugness or superiority, but this feeling
+                    is probably not rational or will make me happy in the
+                    long run. 
+                </para>
+                <para>
+                    Feelings should not be 
+                    <link xlink:href="http://www.mkprojects.com/fa_emotions.html">repressed</link>, 
+                    in the sense that we deny that we feel this way. But we
+                    sometimes can acknowledge that we feel like it, and behave
+                    in a different way. A person is allowed to 
+                    <emphasis role="bold">feel anything</emphasis>
+                    including a desire for mayhem and murder. Only behaving
+                    based on these emotions in either words or deeds may be
+                    bad.
+                </para>
+                <para>
+                    While we can enjoy a rational happy emotion, and
+                    try to behave on a rational bad emotion, we sometimes
+                    need to take actions that will make us feel bad. 
+                    For example, validly criticising a friend in private,
+                    or admiting you've done something wrong.
+                </para>
+            </footnote>
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            That put aside, you shouldn't feel bad about being depressed. It's
+            OK and natural, but 
+        </para>
+
+    </section>
+
+
+</section>
+
+<section xml:id="computer-devs-and-anxieties">
+        <info>
+            <title>Computer Developers and Anxieties</title>
+        </info>
+
+    <para>
+Computer Developers are probably more likely to become anxious than people
+of most other professions. With the irrational working hours (see 
+<link xlink:href="http://www.igda.org/articles/erobinson_crunch.php">Evan Robinson's
+"Crunch Mode" article</link> ), tight schedules,
+tactless or unfriendly co-workers, bad software management practices,
+bad code and lack of craftsmanship, irrational management that
+demands the impossible, too few vacations, and other factors - it is
+probable that they will feel trapped, resentful, unhappy, and as a likely
+result, anxious or depressed.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
+        As a software manager, it is your job to keep your software
+        developers happy.  This means doing the exact opposite of the
+        above-mentioned points. Refer to <link xlink:href="http://www.shlomifish.org/philosophy/computers/software-management/perfect-workplace/">an essay 
+            which I started writing titled "The Perfect IT Workplace"</link>
+        for more information on how to do that.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
+        As opposed to common belief, treating your software developers with
+        superb conditions, will make them much more productive, not less. So
+        make sure you read my article above (and the links pointed to from it),
+        and integrate its recommendations into your workplace.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
+        Naturally, this is more difficult to do if you're a grunt
+        programmer. However, you can still refer your boss to what I wrote if
+        you feel he's reasonable enough. If not, it may be a good idea to quit
+        or even to relocate to somewhere with more job opportunities. Some jobs
+        are worse than being unemployed.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
+        Obviously, from reading "Feeling Good", it is evident that
+        depressions, anxieties and hypomanias are not limited to programmers,
+        and actually predate programming by a long time. Many retired people
+        also find themselves the sudden victims of these mental ailments.
+        However, I feel that due to bad state-of-the-art of software management
+        in the world today, it is especially common there, than in most other
+        jobs.
+    </para>
+
+</section>
+
+<section xml:id="advice-from-my-experience">
+        <info>
+            <title>Some Advice from My Experience</title>
+        </info>
+
+    <para>
+        Like I said earlier, I still haven't fully recovered from my
+        Mania-Depressia and am still getting into hypomanias. However, here is
+        some advice I can give from my experience:
+    </para>
+
+
+    <section xml:id="do-cognitive-exercises">
+        <info>
+            <title>Do Cognitive Exercises</title>
+        </info>
+
+        <para>
+            This is probably the single best advice one can give. Read 
+            <link xlink:href="http://www.amazon.com/Feeling-Good-Therapy-Revised-Updated/dp/0380810336">"Feeling
+                Good"</link> and do the exercises given there. They have
+            proved very helpful to me.
+        </para>
+
+    </section>
+
+    <section xml:id="physical-exercise">
+        <info>
+            <title>Physical Exercise</title>
+        </info>
+
+        <para>
+            Exercising and especially doing aerobic exercise (jogging,
+            biking, dancing, swimming, etc.) is very useful 
+            for preventing or lessening anxieties.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            My therapist recommended that in order to sleep well
+            during days in which I'm hypomanic, I should exercise during
+            the late afternoon and evening.
+        </para>
+
+    </section>
+
+    <section xml:id="diet">
+        <info>
+            <title>Diet</title>
+        </info>
+
+        <para>
+            I don't consume alcoholic beverages, don't consume caffeine,
+            have never smoked, and have never consumed any of the currently
+            illegal drugs. While it does not prevent hypomanias, I find that
+            it makes me less moody, more energetic throughout the day, and
+            allows me to sleep better at nights. (I had also tried to refrain
+            from eating sugary foods, but I couldn't persist in it very well.)
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            I also take multi-vitamin pills, and some people take many more
+            individual minerals than I do, and while I'm not sure it helps
+            with anxieties, it's very good for health and longevity.
+        </para>
+
+    </section>
+
+    <section xml:id="relaxation">
+        <info>
+            <title>Relaxation</title>
+        </info>
+
+        <para>
+            I also find that relaxing or doing things you love to do is
+            helpful for keeping a good self-esteem. It's especially important
+            during anxieties.  Listening to music, sitting, thinking and doing
+            nothing, taking a time for leisure at the computer, are useful for
+            relief from troubling thought.
+        </para>
+
+    </section>
+
+    <section xml:id="perform-your-priorities">
+        <info>
+            <title>Try to Perform Your Priorities</title>
+        </info>
+
+        <para>
+            That put aside, I should note that working on what you have to
+            do, will make you feel better, and is better than just 
+            procrastinating, and will also displace a large burden from
+            your heart, that keeps you nervous.
+        </para>
+
+    </section>
+
+    <section xml:id="write-down-your-thoughts">
+        <info>
+            <title>Write Down Your Thoughts</title>
+        </info>
+
+        <para>
+            When I'm hypomanic, I'm getting lots of good ideas: for stories,
+            for essays, random useful thoughts, etc. While a lot of them had
+            seemed silly in the past, some of them proved to be very useful and
+            rational.<footnote xml:id="mania-stories" label="ManiaStories">
+                <para>
+                    I even ended up finding many really crazy delusions I had
+                    during my "great mania" as fodder for the following 
+                    stories:
+                </para>
+
+                <orderedlist>
+                    <listitem>
+                        <para>
+                            <link xlink:href="http://www.shlomifish.org/humour/humanity/">Humanity</link>
+                        </para>
+                    </listitem>
+                    <listitem>
+                        <para>
+                            <link xlink:href="http://www.shlomifish.org/humour/Star-Trek/We-the-Living-Dead/">Star Trek: We, the Living Dead</link>
+                        </para>
+                    </listitem>
+                </orderedlist>
+
+                <para>
+                    And, naturally, my hypomanias have been catalysts for most 
+                    of <link xlink:href="http://www.shlomifish.org/humour/">my other 
+                        stories.</link>
+                </para>
+        </footnote></para>
+
+        <para>
+            It would be a good idea to write the ideas down, or even work on
+            realising the essays or articles, because it makes one less excited
+            and calmer. I would be a good idea not to publicise them in public
+            until you're well out of a hypomania, because they may prove to be
+            immature or silly in the short-run.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            I personally may have sometimes been rejected from jobs because
+            of the many things I've written and placed online, and which are
+            easily accessible using a Google Search.  I don't mind that because
+            I feel that expressing and publicising my creativity is more
+            important than making myself a better job candidate to some
+            "attractive" jobs. And some employers seemed to be very impressed
+            by some of what I wrote online, or at least did not mind that, and
+            these seem like jobs I prefer.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            It is naturally a good idea to receive as much commentary as
+            possible about one's articles or writings in private before
+            publicising them for all the Internet to see.
+        </para>
+
+    </section>
+
+    <section xml:id="be-honest">
+        <info>
+            <title>Be Honest</title>
+        </info>
+
+        <para>
+It is a good idea to admit that you're "stressed" - anxious, etc. My therapist
+said that the word "hypomania" is intimidating because it contains the word
+"mania", so one should rephrase it in case the other party is not that
+knowledgable about Psychology. Sometimes you may find some of your
+friends or family (but not all) good candidates for consulting with your 
+thoughts or feelings. I once spent an hour or so on an IRC (= Internet
+Relay Chat) conversation listening to a 19-years-old whom I knew, talking 
+about her problems. I also consulted people on IRC or IM about my own issues 
+and often found creative solutions or empathy.
+</para>
+
+<para>
+This is doubly correct for talking with my family members.
+</para>
+
+    </section>
+
+    <section xml:id="maintain-low-profile">
+
+        <info>
+            <title>Maintain a Low Online Profile</title>
+        </info>
+
+        <para>
+            During a hypomania, it is a good idea to maintain a low online
+            profile.  Namely, don't post too much to mailing lists or other
+            forums, don't chat on the IRC too much (and try to focus on
+            technical problems or your psychological situation), and in general
+            try to maintain a low-profile.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            However, I feel that real-life meetings with people and talking
+            to them face to face is actually very good for one's well-being
+            during a hypomania.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            So if you can get a friend or a few to meet with you in a café ,
+            or go to a club meeting, it will be a good idea.
+        </para>
+
+    </section>
+
+    <section xml:id="philosophy">
+        <info>
+            <title>Philosophy</title>
+        </info>
+        
+        <para>
+            It is my impression that often the philosophies and idea systems
+            that we are generally exposed to (i.e: most western religions), 
+            are very harmful for one's self-esteem and prevent one from
+            properly getting out of depressions.
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            The Judeo-Christian ethics instill a lot of feelings of guilt
+            in people for perfectly innocent actions and thoughts. Also the
+            psychological fuel there is contradictory, aims to control people
+            and subject them to higher causes, and is harmful to one's
+            self-esteem. 
+        </para>
+
+        <para>
+            Therefore, I suggest you instead study and adopt a more benevolent
+            psychological philosophy, which will help give you enough tools
+            to live your life more happily and to deal with clinical
+            conditions as they arise. My personal favourite is
+            <link xlink:href="http://www.shlomifish.org/philosophy/philosophy/guide-to-neo-tech/">Neo-Tech</link>,
+            which is an extension and re-organisation of 
+            <link xlink:href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Objectivism_(Ayn_Rand)">Ayn 
+                Rand's Objectivism</link>, with many vital corrections.
+            However, I do not rule out that different personal
+            philosophies will be better for different people.
+        </para>
+
+    </section>
+
+    <section xml:id="reliefs">
+        <info>
+            <title>Receive some Reliefs for Your Condition</title>
+        </info>
+
+        <para>
+            It's possible that if you're a university student or a
+            grunt employee, then you can get some reliefs for your
+            medical condition. So try to see if it is possible, and if
+            so - do that.
+        </para>
+
+    </section>
+
+</section>
+
+<section xml:id="curse-and-blessing">
+        <info>
+            <title>The Curse and the Blessing</title>
+        </info>
+
+    <para>
+        In <link xlink:href="http://memory-alpha.org/en/wiki/Tapestry">"Tapestry",
+            one of the "Star Trek: The Next Generation" episodes that I
+            vividly remember the most</link>, Captain Picard dies and then is given
+        a choice to revert an incident in his past. After he does that, he
+        discovers that he is no longer Captain and that he have lacked the
+        self-motivation that was needed in order to become the hero that he 
+        used to be. As a result, he says that "I would rather die as the man I 
+        was, than live the life I just saw."
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
+        Or consider <link 
+            xlink:href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helen_Keller">Helen
+            Keller</link>, who was born deaf-blind. If she had been born 
+        normal, she would most likely have led a happy life. On the other
+        hand, without her disability, she might not had become the superwoman 
+        that she did, because there would have been nothing to motivate her.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
+        Would I rather lead a normal life? Yes, I would. But, on the other
+        hand, I recognise that being Bipolar is part of who I am, and probably
+        the price I have to pay for being so creative. While I would like to
+        reduce its effect, I thank God (so to speak) for allowing me to be
+        able to write so many articles and essays, compose so many stories,
+        and being a capable programmer.
+    </para>
+
+    <para>
+        So I guess the curse and the blessing are part of what makes me who
+        I am.
+    </para>
+
+</section>
+</article>    <!-- End of the article -->