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#include '../template.wml'

#include "toc_div.wml"

<latemp_subject "Homepage vs. Blog" />
<latemp_meta_desc "Explains the distinction between a homepage (or homesite) and a blog, and why this site is not a blog" />
<latemp_more_keywords "HTML, Homesite, Homepage, Home, Blog, Weblog, Tags, Categories, RSS" />

<h2 id="about">About this Document</h2>

<p>
This documents explains the distinction between a homepage (or homesite) and
a blog and why <a href="$(ROOT)">this site</a> is not a blog. It is adapted
from <a href="http://allium.zgp.org/pipermail/linux-elitists/2007-April/011919.html">this
post to the Linux-Elitists mailing list</a>.
</p>

<toc_div />

<h2 id="meta">Document Information</h2>

<dl class="meta">
<dt>
Written By:
</dt>
<dd>
<a href="http://www.shlomifish.org/">Shlomi Fish</a>
</dd>
<dt>
Finish Date:
</dt>
<dd>
28-April-2007
</dd>
<dt>
Last Updated:
</dt>
<dd>
28-April-2007
</dd>
</dl>

<h3 id="licence">Licence</h3>

<cc_by_british_blurb year="2007" />

<h2 id="itself">The Article Itself</h2>

<p>
As you may know since the Internet boom circa 1996, many people started their
own personal web sites. These sites  were called “homepages”, or later-on
“homesites” (which is the word that I prefer because homepage is just one
page).
</p>

<p>
Now, <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blog">blogs</a> were a later
phenomenon. What a blog (also known as “public  journal”, “weblog”, etc) is
is:
</p>

<ol>

<li>
A stream of posts on various topics, ordered by date.
</li>

<li>
Usually has <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_feed">a web feed</a>.
</li>

<li>
Should have comments. I
<a href="http://shlomif.livejournal.com/11085.html">left
Advogato</a> due to this reason among others.
</li>

<li>
Normally either personal, random or dedicated to a certain topic.
</li>

<li>
Usually flat and non-hierarchical. At most has tags.
</li>

</ol>

<p>
Now my homesite on the other hand, and several other homesites as well is:
</p>

<ol>

<li>
Organised in a tree (“About myself”, “Humour”, “Puzzles”, “Computer Art”,
“Software”, etc.). The categories contain many resources not commonly present
in a blog, and there for people to browse and see.
</li>

<li>
Has a central navigation menu and sub-navigation menus. Most blogs are flat
or at most have tags which are completely different.
</li>

<li>
Has many resources that are not normally present in blogs. How many times
have you seen a full 10,000-words-long story posted to a blog? Or pages that
only contain links.
</li>

<li>
Many of the pages there are constantly updated. A blog entry normally
remains mostly static after a while, while the pages of my homesite are
very dynamic.
</li>

<li>
There are no comments in any of the pages. It’s a static HTML site. Had it
been a blog, I would have made sure to give a nested comments facility. I
admit that I often post a notice about them to mailing lists, news sites, web
forums, etc. But they are not blog entries.
</li>

</ol>

<p>
Now, I do have <a href="$(ROOT)/me/blogs/">some weblogs</a> and write in
them often. But my home site is a completely different and much more impressive
beast.
</p>

<p>
I realise there has lately been an inflation of those practically-all-blog
home sites using Movable Type, WordPress, or their likes. Normally, the blogger
maintains the front page of the site as a blog, and adds a page or two about
other things. I personally always look down on such sites.
</p>