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More proofchecking up to id="epilogue".

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   </chapter>
   <chapter xml:id="interview_with_the_enemy">
       <info><title>Interviewing with the Enemy</title></info>
-  <para>After I landed in the airport, I reserved a hotel room in one of the main cities in the Enemy’s country and took a cab that went there. On the way I was able to see the view around, and despite the closeness to my country, it was much different from what was known to me. I’m not talking about the climate — the country was simply more developed. The economy of the Enemy’s country is far from being perfect, but it is still considered to be one of the countries of the other part of the world.</para>
+  <para>After I landed in the airport, I reserved a hotel room in one of the main cities in the Enemy’s country, and took a cab that went there. On the way I was able to see the view around, and despite the closeness to my country, it was much different from what was known to me. I’m not talking about the climate — the country was simply more developed. The economy of the Enemy’s country is far from being perfect, but it is still considered to be one of the countries of the other part of the world.</para>
   <para>After I got up in the morning, and started to tour it (with a direct intention to gather intelligence information), I noticed that the atmosphere there was not much different from what I remembered in my country. However, it bothered me that all the people I asked accepted Aristotle’s <emphasis>Organum</emphasis> without a doubt. I assumed that that what would happen, but I hope the publication of my book will change this fact even there.</para>
-  <para>It was in the middle of that day when a black car stopped next to me and a man that wore sun‐glasses came out from the seat next to the driver’s seats. He said to me in a thick voice: “The ex‐Member of the Organisation, in order to prevent unpleasantness, please enter and sit at the back seat of the car.”</para>
-  <para>“Sir,” I replied, “, I have a natural tendency to create unpleasantness, but I am willing to suppress it for the while, and therefore, I’ll cooperate.” I said that and entered the car through the back door which was already open. I saw that outside the car, the man that wore the sun‐glasses, closed the back door and entered the car himself. The car drove away, and after a short drive stopped in front of a fortified building. </para>
-  <para>I was instructed to get out of the car and after I exited from it, the guards in the entrance to the building let me and the man from the front in. He led me in a couple of hallways until we reached a door. The door opened into a window‐less room, which had a desk inside. On one of its sides, sat a man, that I assumed was the investigator, and in its other side was a vacant chair. The man that escorted me, told me to sit there, and then closed the door in which we entered and sat down at a chair on the side.</para>
+  <para>It was in the middle of that day, when a black car stopped next to me, and a man that wore sun‐glasses came out from the seat next to the driver’s seat. He said to me in a thick voice: “The ex‐Member of the Organisation, in order to prevent unpleasantness, please enter the car and sit at the back.”</para>
+  <para>“Sir,” I replied, “, I have a natural tendency to create unpleasantness, but I am willing to suppress it for the while, so I’ll cooperate.” I said that, and entered the car through the back door which was already open. I saw that outside the car, the man that wore the sun‐glasses, closed the back door, and entered the car as well. The car drove away, and after a short drive stopped in front of a fortified building. </para>
+  <para>I was instructed to get out of the car and after I went out, the guards in the entrance to the building let me and the man from the front in. He led me in a couple of hallways until we reached a door. The door opened into a window‐less room, which had a desk inside. On one of its sides, sat a man, that I assumed was the investigator, and in its other side was a vacant chair. The man that escorted me, told me to sit there, and then closed the door in which we entered and sat down on a chair at the side of the room.</para>
   <para>The investigator addressed me and said: “Are you the ex‐Member of the Organisation?”</para>
-  <para>“Yes, sir.”, I answered him.</para>
+  <para>“Yes, sir.”, I replied.</para>
   <para>“We would like to ask you a few questions regarding the Organisation and we hope, for your and our sake, that you will cooperate with us.”</para>
   <para>“I’ll do the best I can. Normally, I tend not to cooperate even with myself. That way, if I decide to do a foolish thing — I don’t get hurt and can’t be blamed for causing it either.”</para>
-  <para>“Very well… I apologise that we brought you here so urgently, but you must remember that if it wasn’t for this interview, you wouldn’t be able to visit here, and we wanted to interview you before you start touring our country and we’ll lose track of you.”</para>
+  <para>“Very well… I apologise that we brought you here so urgently, but you must remember that if it were not for this interview, you would not be able to visit here, and we wanted to interview you before you start touring our country and we will lose track of you.”</para>
   <para>“Sir, the only person who ever lost track of me is myself.”</para>
-  <para>“I understand, but since you’re already here I’ll begin the interview anyway. First question: why did you resign from the Organisation?”</para>
+  <para>“I understand, but since you’re already here, I’ll begin the interview anyway. First question: why did you resign from the Organisation?”</para>
   <para>“Because I wanted to resign from it.”</para>
   <para>“And why did you want to resign from the Organisation?”</para>
   <para>“So I’ll have a good excuse if somebody asks me why I resigned from it.”</para>
   <para>“But you asked me to describe the service in general.”</para>
   <para>“All right. Can you describe it in a more detailed way?”</para>
   <para>“Of course. I remember what happened in a rather detailed manner. I started to serve in November 5, 1996 at 8:03 exactly. For five minutes, I waited outside the registration room and then I was let in. The interviewer asked me for my name and I replied. Then he asked me for my address, my telephone number, my marital status… ”</para>
-  <para>The investigator interrupted me: “O.K.! O.K.! Forget it. Describe the amount of ambition to fight of the members of the Organisation to me.”</para>
+  <para>The investigator interrupted me: “O.K.! O.K.! Forget it. Please estimate the amount of motivation the members of the Organisation had to fight.”</para>
   <para>“Look, I only know for certain what was the motivation of my comrades from the post, may they rest in peace, but because they are not longer among the living, I don’t think it would be very helpful to you.”</para>
   <para>“And what about those who serve in other posts?”</para>
   <para>“It changes from post to post. The mutual relationship between the commander of the post to the members of the Organisation that are under his command can very much affect the willingness of the members to fight the Enemy.”</para>
   <para>“How?”</para>
   <para>“If the relationship between them is good, they are more willing to do so.”</para>
-  <para>“Ah hah. Can you tell me what was the attitude of your comrades toward the Enemy, the Supporter or the Occupier?”</para>
+  <para>“Ah hah. Can you tell me what was the attitude of your comrades toward the Enemy, the Supporter, or the Occupier?”</para>
   <para>“Yes. From what I recall, we hated the Enemy and despised the Occupier, even though we acknowledged the fact that he allows us a freedom of action against the Enemy.”</para>
   <para>“We already know that!”</para>
   <para>“Excellent! Now you have a more solid basis to assume that.”</para>
   <para>“Very well. Tell me: what weaponry and equipment, and in what quantity,  did you have in the post?”</para>
-  <para>“All the weapons and equipment that we had were destroyed because of the tragic battle that occurred there between the men of the post to themselves.”</para>
+  <para>“All the weapons and equipment that we had were destroyed because of the tragic battle that occurred there between the members of the Organisation who served in the post to themselves.”</para>
   <para>“Can you tell me anything about the equipment and the weaponry that is kept by other posts?”</para>
   <para>“No. I wasn’t interested in what went on in other posts, because I was too concerned with the affairs of my own post. You see, I never thought I’ll ever have to give intelligence information for the other side.”</para>
   <para>“I see. How would you rate the fighting ability and the level of the fighters who served with you in the post?”</para>
   <para>“In my appreciation, the fighting ability of my comrades ranged between an excellent fighting ability to a very low fighting ability, with a tendency to concentrate in either of the two extremes, or in any level between them.”</para>
   <para>“Do you have any other information that can aid us in our struggle against the Organisation?”</para>
   <para>“Of course, I can explain Newton’s Second Law of Motion to you. It’s a very useful law and is almost compulsory for effective military warfare.”</para>
-  <para>“The men of our military know and understand Newton’s Second Law of Motion, very well, and I’m sure they use it a lot for many purposes in the routine management of the military.”</para>
-  <para>“You see: even you agree that it’s useful! But since you already know it, I don’t suppose that there’s a use for me to explain it to you. I can guide you in other fields of physics that I am familiar with.”</para>
-  <para>“That won’t be necessary. I’m afraid I’m out of questions to ask you.”</para>
-  <para>“Excellent.” I replied, “Because I’m out of replies too. I made an effort that they will be as to the point and as informative as possible, but at a certain point, I too ran out of available knowledge.”</para>
+  <para>“The men of our military already know and understand Newton’s Second Law of Motion, very well, and I’m sure they use it a lot for many purposes in the routine management of the military.”</para>
+  <para>“You see: even you agree that it’s useful! But since you already know it, I don’t suppose that there’s a use for me to explain it to you. I can guide you in other fields of physics with which I am familiar.”</para>
+  <para>“That won’t be necessary. I’m afraid I ran out of questions to ask you.”</para>
+  <para>“Excellent.” I replied, “Because I ran out of replies too. I made an effort that they will be as to the point and as informative as possible, but at a certain point, I too ran out of available knowledge.”</para>
   </chapter>
   <chapter xml:id="with_enemies_like_this">
       <info><title>With Enemies Like This, Who Needs Friends?</title></info>
   <para>After the interview with the intelligence agency, I decided to continue my tour of the Enemy’s country with the emphasis on collecting important intelligence information in indirect means. I started my intelligence work in a visit I conducted the next day’s morning in one of the water parks of the country. I always wanted to visit a place like that and to amuse myself in it, and I assumed I can conduct some serious espionage over there. I continued with guided tours in the main cities and in the ancient cities, a visit to the theme park, and meals at fancy restaurants. One of the most dangerous espionage missions I took was a guided tour for expert hikers that included cliff‐hanging. Of course the rest of the tourists that participated in the tour could have done the same intelligence work I did, but they were not aware of the great intelligence potential that it had.</para>
   <para>After I completed all those missions, I possessed a large amount of intelligence information about the Enemy. The only fact that could shadow the success of my mission was that that information was not substantially different from the information I had before I visited its country. In any case, all those missions exhausted me and I decided to continue in the tour in a less intensive pace. As a result, I decided that I would just tour the cities of the country in my own pace, without a defined cause.</para>
-  <para>So, I had the opportunity of visiting various places, most of which were completely mundane for the locals, but still pretty interesting for a stranger. Thus, for instance, I was present in a political assembly of one of the country’s political parties. I saw the leader of the party give his speech to the loud voice of the encouragement calls of those present. I decided to try my mathematical skills in calculating the sum of the independent opinions of those present in the crowd, but even I realised that it was hard for me to work with such low numbers. After I had to change the digital precision three times during the calculation of the sum of the first ten independent opinions, I realised it would be too hard for me.</para>
-  <para>However, I managed to make it up to myself on this failure during that tour. Two days after that, I stumbled into one of the universities there and noticed a sign that announced a large gathering that took place there that day: “‘Out of the north an evil shall open’: a symposium regarding the political status between us and the Occupier and the Country”. I decided it was something I had to be present in, and therefore I immediately bought a ticket for that and went into the lecturing hall.</para>
-  <para>I noticed that one of the lectures was already in session and the professor who lectured was just explaining why the present situation made it difficult on signing a normalisation treaty between the Enemy and the Occupier. I found a vacant seat and sat there. To my side, sat a young man that wrote notes in a notebook he held in his hand. I assumed he was a student. After a few minutes he turned his look towards me and then his face enlightened from surprise. “Wait a second,” he said “You look familiar. Are you by any chance a famous person? Wait a second, aren’t you the ex‐Member of the Organisation?”</para>
+  <para>So, I had the opportunity of visiting various places, most of which were completely mundane for the locals, but still pretty interesting for a stranger. Thus, for instance, I was present in a political assembly of one of the country’s political parties. I saw the leader of the party give his speech to the loud voice of the encouragement calls of those present. I decided to try my arithmetical skills in calculating the sum of the independent opinions of those present in the crowd, but even I realised that it was hard for me to work with such low numbers. After I had to change the digital precision three times during the calculation of the sum of the first ten independent opinions, I realised it would be too hard for me.</para>
+  <para>However, I managed to make it up to myself on this failure during that tour. Two days after that, I visited one of the universities there and noticed a sign that announced a large seminar that took place there that day: “‘Out of the north an evil shall open’: a symposium regarding the political status between us and the Occupier and the Country”. I decided it was something I had to be present in, and so I immediately bought a ticket for that and went into the lecturing hall.</para>
+  <para>I noticed that one of the lectures was already in session, and the professor who lectured was just explaining why the present situation made it difficult on signing a normalisation treaty between the Enemy and the Occupier. I found a vacant seat and sat there. To my side, sat a young man that wrote notes in a notebook he held in his hand. I assumed he was a student. After a few minutes he turned his look towards me and then his face enlightened from surprise. “Wait a second,” he said “You look familiar. Are you by any chance a famous person? Wait a second, aren’t you the ex‐Member of the Organisation?”</para>
   <para>“The answer to the first question is ‘Yes’.”</para>
   <para>“So you’re not the ex‐Member of the Organisation?”</para>
   <para>“I wouldn’t have deduced it from what I said.”</para>
   <para>But he did not stay to hear the rest of the sentence, but rose up and advanced towards the aisle. He probably identified me with confidence, or alternatively assumed I’m the only man in the world, who might answer in such a cryptic way. He hurried to the front of the hall where he spoke with some of the organisers of the study day. After they consulted between them quietly, one of them went on the stage and whispered something to the lecturer. The lecturer stopped lecturing, pondered for a moment and then said: “Gentlemen, I was informed right now that the ex‐Member of the Organisation, that as we all know is visiting our country now, is at the moment present in this hall. Due to the important part he took in shaping the political status we are discussing today, I ask him to get on this stage and present us his opinion regarding the Organisation and the political state that prevails in the Country.”</para>
   <para>And so I rose and advanced toward the stage to the hand‐clapping of the audience in the hall. After I went on the stage, the professor shook my hand, presented me with the microphone and went off the stage himself. I rose my hand to silence the hand‐clapping, waited until they stopped and started to speak:</para>
   <blockquote>
-  <para>Before I begin with my speech, Id like to announce that, for the duration of the speech, I will accept Aristotle’s <emphasis>Organum</emphasis>. The reason for that is that otherwise I’ll be able to prove any statement as well as its opposite statement. Therefore, since in this case all the possible statements are true, I could have finished the speech at this moment, since there’s no use for me to prove them.</para>
-  <para>As we all know, while the Occupier disabled the activity of all the other terrorist organisation that were active in my country for a long while, and the weaponry that they possessed was given to the army, the state of the Organisation had never been better. Why in that case does the Occupier gives him such a broad freedom of action? The reason for that is that the Organisation is not a national organisation in the full sense of the word or even in half its sense. In fact, it is an organisation that fulfils the philosophy of the Supporter, that strictly opposes the Enemy, but doe not have an interest to struggle against the Occupier.</para>
-  <para>If not for the desire of the Occupier to force the Enemy into a normalisation treaty, the Organisation would not have survived in his current form either. Thus, out of being subordinate to an external political force, one can say that the Organisation is an alien corn in the political map of my country. But I, on my part, don’t find any bad in the integration of foreign interests in local politics. Allow me to quote on the subject one of the most important people of our generation: “Some say: ‘Whatever you can do on your own, you can do best.’ I disagree with them”.</para>
+  <para>Before I begin with my speech, Id like to announce that, for the duration of the speech, I will accept Aristotle’s <emphasis>Organum</emphasis>. The reason for that is that otherwise I’ll be able to prove any statement as well as its opposite statement. Therefore, since in this case all the possible statements are true, I could finish the speech at this moment, since there’s no use for me to prove them.</para>
+  <para>As we all know, while the Occupier disabled the activity of all the other terrorist organisation that were active in my country for a long while, and the weaponry that they possessed was given to the army, the state of the Organisation had never been better. Why in that case does the Occupier gives it such a broad freedom of action? The reason for that is that the Organisation is not a national organisation in the full sense of the word or even in half its sense. In fact, it is an organisation that fulfils the philosophy of the Supporter, that strictly opposes the Enemy, but does not have an interest to struggle against the Occupier.</para>
+  <para>If not for the desire of the Occupier to force the Enemy into a normalisation treaty, the Organisation would not have survived in its current form either. Thus, out of being subordinate to an external political force, one can say that the Organisation is an alien corn in the political map of my country. But I, on my part, don’t find any bad in the integration of foreign interests in local politics. Allow me to quote on the subject one of the most important people of our generation: “Some say: ‘Whatever you can do on your own, you can do best.’ I disagree with them”.</para>
   <para>Because when you let others meddle in your own business, you slowly lose control on what you are doing and what happens to you. In a slow but methodical way, one loses track of his original intentions, one feels that one more and more does not understand why he is doing what he is doing… or for what or for whose sake he is doing it. And then he gets the feeling that nothing is under his responsibility, and that he is in fact a vassal of the external factor. And that is, from experience, the most liberating feeling in the world, which is accompanied by feeling a complete freedom from responsibility or from the need to decide the future on your own.</para>
   <para>Some will say this liberty will soon be over in a ruin, but this liberty, as short as it will be, is a liberty without peer. Or as this great man once said: “Consciousness allows any conscious individual to make his own decisions, but he is most at ease when he is not making use of his consciousness.”.</para>
   <para>Which brings me to the next point: do the members of the Organisation, as members of my people, have a solid reason to fight the Enemy? Vengeance alone was never considered a good reason by any reasonable man, and if their desire is to cause you to get out of the security‐zone you are now controlling, then their struggle against the Enemy doesn’t seem too effective. Most of the politicians in your country are united in their opinion that it has to be kept as long as the tension goes on, and also most of the military people support this. For all that, it is possible, that if there will be peace in the south of my country for an extended time, the Enemy will agree to withdraw from it, out of knowing that it will not hurt the security of those living close to the border.</para>
   <para>Therefore, unless the Organisation had been motivated by the philosophy of the Supporter, he would have changed his manner of activity a long time ago. But since he is subjected to the Supporter, he continues with it without a change.</para>
   <para>Another issue that should be discussed is how much the members of the Organisation are willing to endanger themselves in their struggle against the Enemy. That same person, who is in my opinion one of the most influential men today, tends to say: “A fearful and senseless person can take actions that only the bravest person will take, but he usually does not understand why he is taking them.”. Imagine a group of members of the Organisation who infiltrate the Enemy’s lines in the hope of killing its soldiers. Such infiltration would be presented as fanatical by you and as full of courage by the Organisation itself. However, it should be remembered that behind every such ´fanatical´ action there is a hierarchy of commanders and sub‐commanders, a line of comrades that support and encourage, a whole lot of national and ´ideological´ preachers who give flaming speeches against the Enemy (even though they, usually, are not involved in the physical activity against him), and a mass of citizens that support this activity and is content with it. All the weight of this pyramid is placed above the unit of the members of the Organisation that flies like a cork out of a bottle and walks towards its death. Taking all this scenario into consideration, the question being raised is how “fanatical” they really are.</para>
   <para>Naturally their decision did not involve much thought, at least not in the direction that they understand that they are walking towards their death. Or as the same great man once commented: “If a terrorist stopped and took ten minutes to think about his actions, he would lose his sanity.”. I’m not saying the members of the Organisation are terrorists, but, in my opinion, this statement applies to them too.</para>
-  <para>The question you are most concerned by is probably: what is going to happen in the northern border of your country. About that, allow me to quote that same influential person once more: “I agree with the head mystics in our time. Despite the logical and practical difficulties, predicting an event, is apparently not so hard after the event had occurred.”</para>
+  <para>The question you are most concerned by is probably: what is going to happen in the northern border of your country. About that, allow me to quote that same influential person once more: “I agree with the head mystics in our time. Despite the logical and practical difficulties, predicting an event, is apparently not so difficult after the event had occurred.”</para>
   <para>The possibility exists that the Supporter will understand that the Organisation is useless (at least objectively), and a waste of resources that are anyhow missing to the Supporter’s country. Moreover, it causes the spoiling of the relationship between it and the countries of the second part of the world, that detest ´terrorists´, not to mention the big banks who hold his debts. As of today, the only obstacle that stops the Supporter from reaching this realisation is the fact that it rejects Aristotle’s <emphasis>Organum</emphasis>.</para>
   <para>Another possibility that your country have is to try to arrange economical sanctions on the Occupier, so it will stop the activity of the Organisation. However, heads of countries are not content to harm the economical activity of the countries by such sanctions, even if their trade with the Occupier is limited. As for large private corporations — it’s hard for me to believe that one can convince enough of them to ostracise the Occupier enough for it to harm his economy in a significant way. Moreover, every company is afraid its competitors will take this opportunity to try and make a profit on its account.</para>
   <para>There is the option of withdrawing from the security zone. Yet, this action does not guarantee the cease of the military activity of the Organisation at all, and could bring to an escalation, because there will be a more realistic danger of harming the lives of citizens who live close to the border. The acceptance of my proposal could solve the problem for you. Still, there isn’t a full guarantee that it will not be rejected if the heads of the Organisation will find a way to bypass it, and therefore you should not count on it.</para>
   <para>The most practical and fast way to terminate the activity of the Organisation is, perhaps, to sign a normalisation treaty with the Occupier. However, the Occupier has its own conditions, that if the Enemy accepts them, its security in the northern border will decrease significantly. Since the power of the Occupier is ten times greater than the Organisation’s, one can understand why your country does not rejoice to sign a normalisation treaty with it, while accepting all the conditions that are inferred from it.</para>
-  <para>Indeed, it is very hard to deal with the Organisation, which is, in my personal opinion, one of the most interesting organisations of its kind in the current century, if not in the entire history. I do not think I have ever heard about an operational militant organisation that so realises the well‐known sentence: “Give me liberty or give me death”. The only shadow to my admiration, is that in their case they constantly prefer the second alternative.</para>
-  <para>To sum up, it can be clearly seen that dealing with the Organisation, even though it doesn’t endanger the very existence and proper functioning of the Enemy’s country, is hard and problematic. This evil that is open from the north — no one knows when it will close.</para>
+  <para>Indeed, it is extremely difficult to deal with the Organisation, which is, in my personal opinion, one of the most interesting organisations of its kind in the current century, if not in the entire history. I do not think I have ever heard about an operational militant organisation that so realises the well‐known sentence: “Give me liberty or give me death”. The only shadow to my admiration, is that, in their case, they constantly prefer the second alternative.</para>
+  <para>To sum up, it can be clearly seen that dealing with the Organisation, even though it doesn’t endanger the very existence and proper functioning of the Enemy’s country, is difficult and problematic. This evil that is open from the north — no one knows when it will close.</para>
   <para>Does anybody have any questions?</para>
   </blockquote>
   <para>I saw that some people from the audience raised their hands and I gave the permission to speak to a student that sat in front.</para>
   </chapter>
   <chapter xml:id="return_home">
   <info><title>The Return Home</title></info>
-  <para>Two days after the study day, I decided to return home, and therefore I travelled by buses until the northern border of the Enemy’s country, in order to cross the border to my country. The last bus stopped right next to the border pass that allowed passage from the Enemy’s country to the security zone in the south of my country, that as I mentioned before, the Enemy had under its control. Actually, citizens of my country who inhabit the security zone make constant use of this border pass, in order to work in the sovereign area of the Enemy’s country.</para>
-  <para>The border guards did not detain me for long after they understood I was the citizen of the country in the other side of the border, but they advised me to get out of the zone they possessed as soon as possible. I took one organised ride that took me outside the security zone, and then I found another car that was about to go in the direction of my village and took it. After I went off the car, I walked for a short while by foot until I reached the outskirts of my village, during the late afternoon.</para>
-  <para>The village seemed more deserted, and the amount of people who hanged around its streets was smaller than usual to that hour. When I came near my house I understood why: half of my village gathered by my house in what looked like a party that was conducted for my return. After a few seconds, some people noticed me and their calls (“Look over there, here he comes!”) spread the news among the entire crowd. Most of them turned their look toward the street in which I walked and some of them even advanced toward me.</para>
+  <para>Two days after the study day, I decided to return home, and therefore I travelled by buses until the northern border of the Enemy’s country, in order to cross the border to my country. The last bus stopped right next to the border pass that allowed passage from the Enemy’s country to the security zone in the south of my country, that as I mentioned before, the Enemy had under its control. In fact, citizens of my country who inhabit the security zone make constant use of this border pass, in order to work in the sovereign area of the Enemy’s country.</para>
+  <para>The border guards did not detain me for long, after they understood I was the citizen of the country in the other side of the border, but they advised me to get out of the zone they possessed as soon as possible. I took one organised ride that took me outside the security zone, and then I found another car that was about to go in the direction of my village and took it. After I got out of car, I walked for a short while by foot until I reached the outskirts of my village, during the late afternoon.</para>
+  <para>The village seemed more deserted, and the amount of people who hung around its streets was smaller than usual to that hour. When I came near my house I understood why: half of my village gathered by my house in what looked like a party that was conducted for my return. A few seconds later, some people noticed me and their calls (“Look over there, here he comes!”) spread the news among the entire crowd. Most of them turned their look toward the street in which I walked and some of them even advanced toward me.</para>
   <para>So I found myself surrounded by many blessings, questions and shoulder taps, but aside from the basic reactions (“Thank you.”, “Excellent.” and many smiles) I focused on getting a way through the crowd to reach my family. After I got there at the end and stood in front of both my parents, I told them: “I’m back.”</para>
   <para>After two minutes of blessings, hugs, calls and remarks like “How we missed you.” coming from the parents and the more distant family, that stood by them, my father got to the point:</para>
   <para>“So, tell us how it’s been!”</para>
   <para>The crowd slowly silenced and waited in anticipation to my answer and the next answers that would come.</para>
-  <para>“How what exactly has been?” I answered.</para>
-  <para>“Oh, you know…”, my mother asked, “How was the interview?”</para>
+  <para>“How what has been exactly?” I answered.</para>
+  <para>“Oh, you know…” my mother asked, “How was the interview?”</para>
   <para>“Oh! I have a videotape with the interview right here. Didn’t you see it?”</para>
   <para>“Of course! And to be honest, we asked someone to tape it for us, too.”</para>
   <para>“So you know how it’s been.”</para>
-  <para>“Well. So, how was in the Enemy’s country?”</para>
+  <para>“Well. So, how was the visit to the Enemy’s country?”</para>
   <para>“Oh, the Enemy’s country — that’s an entirely different story. Yes. I have something very important to tell you about the Enemy country. In fact…”</para>
   <para>“So get on with it and tell it already.”, one of my cousins cried.</para>
   <para>“All right, I’ll get to the point: I came.”</para>
   <para>“I saw.”</para>
   <para>“Yes?”</para>
   <para>I understood, after a moment, that they expect to say another thing.</para>
-  <para>“That’s it.”, I said.</para>
+  <para>“That’s it.” I said.</para>
   <para>“And isn’t there something else you would like to tell about it?”</para>
   <para>“No, because I assume you have already seen the speech I gave during that seminar in the university.”</para>
   <para>And so the reception returned to its course, as I frequently answer people’s questions regarding the trip I took abroad. “Why did you visit the Enemy’s country at all?”, I was asked after a short while and I answered:</para>
-  <para>“Well, the main reason was that I wanted material for my future book. However, I integrated into it the collection of valuable intelligence information about the Enemy, in a manner that is not considered as illegal by the authorities. Although I managed to get a lot of information without many disturbances, the results I came up with are not very satisfying.</para>
-  <para>As I made clear to myself, most of what I know now, was already known to us, or we assumed it was like that in the first place. In fact, if I wrote a report on the information I know about the Enemy, then 48 out of 51 pages, were already known to us before I took the trip.”</para>
+  <para>“Well, the main reason was that I wanted material for my future book. However, I integrated into it the collection of valuable intelligence information about the Enemy, in a manner that is not considered as illegal by the authorities. Although I managed to get a lot of information without many disturbances, the results I came up with are not very satisfactory.</para>
+  <para>As I made it clear to myself, most of what I know now, was already known to us, or we assumed it was like that in the first place. In fact, had I writter a report on the information I know about the Enemy, then 48 out of 51 pages, would have already been known to us before I took the trip.”</para>
   <para>“And what about the three remaining pages?”</para>
   <para>“Oh, they contain a summary, conclusions and a bibliography.”</para>
-  <para>Some time later, when I was involved in a conversation with my mother, my sister, a friend of mine from the village and two older neighbours, my mother burst and said:</para>
-  <para>“Oh! I forgot to tell you until now, but I talked with out truck driver and he said he will probably be able to hire you as his employee.”</para>
+  <para>Some time later, when I took part in a conversation with my mother, my sister, a friend of mine, from the village and two neighbours, my mother burst and said:</para>
+  <para>“Oh! I forgot to tell you until now, but I talked with our truck driver, and he said he will probably be able to hire you as his employee.”</para>
   <para>“Very good.” I told her, “But, to be honest, I think of starting my own business. The money I got for the interview in foreign currency is considered a fortune around here, and it will certainly suffice for starting to build the business.”</para>
   <para>“In what did you consider to deal with?” My friend asked.</para>
   <para>“Honestly, I didn’t really give it a lot of thought. I’m so talented, that I don’t have enough talent to determine which one of my talents I work at for a living.”</para>