Shlomi Fish avatar Shlomi Fish committed 7816610

Renamed to be more appropriate.

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Files changed (3)

essays/he-who-teaches-well-can/Makefile

 all:
 
 upload:
-	rsync -a -v --progress *.xhtml "$${HOMEPAGE_SSH_PATH}"/they-who-teach-can/
+	rsync -a -v --progress *.xhtml "$${HOMEPAGE_SSH_PATH}"/those-who-teach-can/
 
 firefox:
 	firefox *.xhtml

essays/he-who-teaches-well-can/They-who-teach-well-can.xhtml

-<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
-<!DOCTYPE
-    html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.1//EN"
-    "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml11/DTD/xhtml11.dtd">
-<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en-US">
-<head>
-<title>Those who teach well - can.</title>
-<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
-<meta name="author" content="Shlomi Fish" />
-<meta name="description" content="Shlomi Fish's Homepage" />
-<meta name="keywords" content="" />
-<link rel="stylesheet" href="./style.css" type="text/css" media="screen, projection" title="Normal" />
-<link rel="stylesheet" href="./print.css" type="text/css" media="print" />
-<style type="text/css">
-a:hover { background-color: palegreen;}
-</style>
-</head>
-<body>
-
-<h1>"Those who teach well - can."</h1>
-
-<p>
-George Bernard Shaw said in 
-<a href="http://en.wikiquote.org/w/index.php?title=Man_and_Superman&amp;oldid=1188619"><i>Man and Superman</i></a> that:
-</p>
-
-<blockquote>
-<p>
-He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches.
-</p>
-</blockquote>
-
-<p>
-While this quote is somewhat amusing, I'll make the claim here that it is
-false, and that it should no longer be taken for granted, as a way
-to undervalue all the great teachers out there (of all kinds).
-</p>
-
-<p>
-<a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/">Paul Graham</a> agrees with me
-in his essay <a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/hundred.html"><i>The
-Hundred-Year Language</i></a>:
-</p>
-
-<blockquote>
-<p>
-It's not true that those who can't do, teach (some of the best hackers I know
-are professors), but it is true that there are a lot of things that those who
-teach can't do.
-</p>
-</blockquote>
-
-<p>
-(Hackers here means <a
-href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hacker_%28programmer_subculture%29">a
-competent software developer</a> (or any creative individual in general), not 
-necessarily a computer intruder. See what Graham wrote about it further in
-<a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/gba.html">the word "Hacker"</a>.)
-</p>
-
-<p>
-However, I found earlier insights to that in the so-called Jewish 
-<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oral_Torah">"Oral Torah"</a>, where
-various Jewish scholars, in many periods, collaborated and ended up saying 
-that <b>"I learned a lot from my teachers, and from my peers more than 
-from my teachers, and from my students the most".</b> (There's 
-<a href="http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/kitveyet/shmaatin/hatalmid.htm">an old
-page</a> about it in Visual Hebrew on the 
-<a href="http://www.daat.ac.il/">Hertzog College site</a>.) That was during
-the middle ages, many centuries before Shaw (though it is possible there were
-older, similar, insights among Greek or Roman philosophers).
-</p>
-
-<p>
-I think it means that one learns more by experiencing than by passive
-learning, and even more than that by teaching. From my experience in working
-on the
-<a href="http://perl-begin.org/tutorials/perl-for-newbies/">"Perl for Perl 
-Newbies"</a> series of tutorials (and further educational material about
-software-related topics down the road), I can say that I had to structure
-my thoughts in a logical and deductive way, that my intended audience will
-be able to understand after reading it in order (or maybe only after
-skimming parts of it). I'm not sure if I did a very good job,
-but it still increased my understanding of Perl higher than
-the many years I've actively written Perl code. A different
-software trainer I talked with claimed that he invests about 24 hours in 
-preparing the material for every hour of training he is giving. I've also
-gotten many similar insights from educating people with their Perl problems on
-various on-line forums.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-So, we should realise that those who teach well, can. There are a lot of bad
-teachers of all sorts out there, but being a good teacher requires that
-you have a good understanding of the material, be high competent, and also 
-work very hard (which despite popular belief, can still bring a lot of
-joy and happiness). It's high time we put the "Those who can, do; those who 
-can't teach" prejudice to rest.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-(Also see <a href="http://shlomif.livejournal.com/39215.html">what I've
-written</a> about the variation
-"Those who can, do; those who can't, complain.".)
-</p>
-
-<h2>Meta</h2>
-
-<p>
-This was a small filler post for this blog (
-<a href="http://unarmed.shlomifish.org/">"Unarmed but still Dangerous"</a> ),
-as I'm busy working on some other articles and essays, and enhancing some
-existing essays and stories. I had previously 
-<a href="http://www.shlomifish.org/philosophy/computers/education/introductory-language/#three_levels_of_learning">written about it</a> in my essay
-<a href="http://www.shlomifish.org/philosophy/computers/education/introductory-language/">"Thoughts 
-about the Best Introductory Language"</a>, but I think it got lost in 
-confusion, and did not make a large enough impact on the Blogosophere there.
-</p>
-
-<p>
-My <a href="http://unarmed.shlomifish.org/909.html">previous post</a> proved
-to be very popular after it was Slashdotted successfully, and afterwards
-featured on some other news sites, blogs, microblogs, and on-line forums (some
-people told me it became 
-<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viral_marketing">"viral"</a>). So I'm
-happy with all the attention, and that "Unarmed but still Dangerous", has
-gotten off on the right foot.
-</p>
-
-</body>
-</html>

essays/he-who-teaches-well-can/Those-who-teach-well-can.xhtml

+<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
+<!DOCTYPE
+    html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.1//EN"
+    "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml11/DTD/xhtml11.dtd">
+<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en-US">
+<head>
+<title>Those who teach well - can.</title>
+<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
+<meta name="author" content="Shlomi Fish" />
+<meta name="description" content="Shlomi Fish's Homepage" />
+<meta name="keywords" content="" />
+<link rel="stylesheet" href="./style.css" type="text/css" media="screen, projection" title="Normal" />
+<link rel="stylesheet" href="./print.css" type="text/css" media="print" />
+<style type="text/css">
+a:hover { background-color: palegreen;}
+</style>
+</head>
+<body>
+
+<h1>"Those who teach well - can."</h1>
+
+<p>
+George Bernard Shaw said in 
+<a href="http://en.wikiquote.org/w/index.php?title=Man_and_Superman&amp;oldid=1188619"><i>Man and Superman</i></a> that:
+</p>
+
+<blockquote>
+<p>
+He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches.
+</p>
+</blockquote>
+
+<p>
+While this quote is somewhat amusing, I'll make the claim here that it is
+false, and that it should no longer be taken for granted, as a way
+to undervalue all the great teachers out there (of all kinds).
+</p>
+
+<p>
+<a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/">Paul Graham</a> agrees with me
+in his essay <a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/hundred.html"><i>The
+Hundred-Year Language</i></a>:
+</p>
+
+<blockquote>
+<p>
+It's not true that those who can't do, teach (some of the best hackers I know
+are professors), but it is true that there are a lot of things that those who
+teach can't do.
+</p>
+</blockquote>
+
+<p>
+(Hackers here means <a
+href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hacker_%28programmer_subculture%29">a
+competent software developer</a> (or any creative individual in general), not 
+necessarily a computer intruder. See what Graham wrote about it further in
+<a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/gba.html">the word "Hacker"</a>.)
+</p>
+
+<p>
+However, I found earlier insights to that in the so-called Jewish 
+<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oral_Torah">"Oral Torah"</a>, where
+various Jewish scholars, in many periods, collaborated and ended up saying 
+that <b>"I learned a lot from my teachers, and from my peers more than 
+from my teachers, and from my students the most".</b> (There's 
+<a href="http://www.daat.ac.il/daat/kitveyet/shmaatin/hatalmid.htm">an old
+page</a> about it in Visual Hebrew on the 
+<a href="http://www.daat.ac.il/">Hertzog College site</a>.) That was during
+the middle ages, many centuries before Shaw (though it is possible there were
+older, similar, insights among Greek or Roman philosophers).
+</p>
+
+<p>
+I think it means that one learns more by experiencing than by passive
+learning, and even more than that by teaching. From my experience in working
+on the
+<a href="http://perl-begin.org/tutorials/perl-for-newbies/">"Perl for Perl 
+Newbies"</a> series of tutorials (and further educational material about
+software-related topics down the road), I can say that I had to structure
+my thoughts in a logical and deductive way, that my intended audience will
+be able to understand after reading it in order (or maybe only after
+skimming parts of it). I'm not sure if I did a very good job,
+but it still increased my understanding of Perl higher than
+the many years I've actively written Perl code. A different
+software trainer I talked with claimed that he invests about 24 hours in 
+preparing the material for every hour of training he is giving. I've also
+gotten many similar insights from educating people with their Perl problems on
+various on-line forums.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+So, we should realise that those who teach well, can. There are a lot of bad
+teachers of all sorts out there, but being a good teacher requires that
+you have a good understanding of the material, be high competent, and also 
+work very hard (which despite popular belief, can still bring a lot of
+joy and happiness). It's high time we put the "Those who can, do; those who 
+can't teach" prejudice to rest.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+(Also see <a href="http://shlomif.livejournal.com/39215.html">what I've
+written</a> about the variation
+"Those who can, do; those who can't, complain.".)
+</p>
+
+<h2>Meta</h2>
+
+<p>
+This was a small filler post for this blog (
+<a href="http://unarmed.shlomifish.org/">"Unarmed but still Dangerous"</a> ),
+as I'm busy working on some other articles and essays, and enhancing some
+existing essays and stories. I had previously 
+<a href="http://www.shlomifish.org/philosophy/computers/education/introductory-language/#three_levels_of_learning">written about it</a> in my essay
+<a href="http://www.shlomifish.org/philosophy/computers/education/introductory-language/">"Thoughts 
+about the Best Introductory Language"</a>, but I think it got lost in 
+confusion, and did not make a large enough impact on the Blogosophere there.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+My <a href="http://unarmed.shlomifish.org/909.html">previous post</a> proved
+to be very popular after it was Slashdotted successfully, and afterwards
+featured on some other news sites, blogs, microblogs, and on-line forums (some
+people told me it became 
+<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viral_marketing">"viral"</a>). So I'm
+happy with all the attention, and that "Unarmed but still Dangerous", has
+gotten off on the right foot.
+</p>
+
+</body>
+</html>
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