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File essays/publish-or-perish-=-life-or-death/Publish-or-Perish.xhtml

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 <h1>“Publish or Perish” = “Life or Death”</h1>
 
+<p>
+There is an old adage about the Academic life that reads:
+<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Publish_or_perish">“Publish
+or Perish”</a>. Wikipedia reads:
+</p>
+
+<blockquote>
+<p>
+“Publish or perish” is a phrase coined to describe the pressure in academia to
+rapidly and continuously publish academic work to sustain or further one's
+career.
+</p>
+<p>
+Frequent publication is one of few methods at scholars’ disposal to demonstrate
+academic talent. Successful publications bring attention to scholars and their
+sponsoring institutions, which can facilitate continued funding and an
+individual's progress through their field.
+</p>
+</blockquote>
+
+<p>
+Let’s go a little farther from the “frequent publishing” and just into
+publishing something in time, and it is evident that a man has two choices:
+</p>
+
+<ol>
+
+<li>
+<p>
+To publish everything he or she knows and thinks in time, and be completely
+honest and sincere (without lying, keeping secrets, or even speaking in
+riddles, but while still keeping some privacy and using tact and wisdom.).
+( = "Publish" ).
+</p>
+</li>
+
+<li>
+<p>
+To keep things to himself or herself, lie, or use other forms of deceit
+or camouflage, thus resulting in him isolating himself from society and
+becoming paranoid. (= "Perish" ).
+</p>
+</li>
+</ol>
+
+<p>
+If we look at history, we will see that the most enduring and surviving idea
+systems were the ones that consistently published: the
+<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Greek_philosophy">Greek
+philosophers</a>,
+the Jewish scholars, the Muslim scholars of medieval times, the
+post-Renaissance/post-Printing-press Europeans, the American mass-media /
+mass-publishing revolution of the 20th century, and the
+<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User-generated_content">user-generated
+content</a>
+Internet of today. Yes, there always was a lot of junk
+(see <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sturgeon%27s_Law">Sturgeon’s Law
+that says that “90% of everything is crap”</a>), and that includes the
+very <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanakh">Tanakh (= Jewish Bible)</a>
+that many people still consider holy, but there is always a minority of
+exceptionally good stuff.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+It is extremely unlikely that a single man called Aesop told all of the
+<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aesop%27s_Fables">fables
+that were attributed to him</a>, and even if
+<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David">(King) David</a> existed, he has
+not taken all of the actions that he was told to have taken in the Bible,
+because many such tales were common in the ancient Near East. Instead, they
+were both ancient <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meme">memes</a>, and
+people were expected to improve upon them, and gradually add more and more
+to them.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+So you should definitely publish, because keeping your “secrets” or
+“core competency” for yourself is not only dishonest, but a superbly
+bad strategy, because you will have little motivation to improve what you did,
+and other people won’t be able to contribute to it, build upon it,
+or criticise it.
+</p>
+
 </body>
 </html>