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File essays/invisibles-of-the-world-ascend-and-become-alphas/invisibles-of-the-world-ascend-and-become-alphas.xhtml

 And that was also my problem, which I've decided to avoid now.
 </p>
 
+<h2>David and Goliath</h2>
+
+<p>
+The Israelites and the Philistines schedule a large battle. The philistines
+have far superior equipment with armors made out of cast iron, which the
+Israelites don't have. Eventually, Goliath, a tall Philistine giant, steps
+forward and asks for an Israelite man worthy enough to fight him and determine
+the fate of the battle (something quite common in the Near East). The
+Israelites seem like they will lose the battle.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Out of nowhere, a young Israeli boy whom hardly anyone knew about steps forward
+with a sling and a few pebbles. Goliath thinks this is ridiculous and ridicules
+him. However, the boy quickly puts a pebble in his sling, and after rotating
+it to achieve a very large velocity (not unusual with slings) hurls it with
+great accuracy (also not unusual, because shepherds in the Near East
+effectively used slings to kill lions and other predators to their flock)
+into Goliath's face, which was uncovered to allow him to see. Even if Goliath's
+shield bearer wanted, he could not have lifted the huge shield in time, and
+Goliath was completely not agile in his suit and armor. The sling's rock
+smashes Goliath brain, and he falls to the ground dead. The Israelites have
+won the battle.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+The Boy's name was David.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Why do I think it's important here? Because David was a hacker (see
+<a href="http://www.paulgraham.com/gba.html">Paul Graham’s
+    “The Word ‘Hacker’”</a>) - he knew the rules, and played by them,
+but knew how to bend them and violate them to earn his victory. There
+were many other hackers since, and there are a lot of them today even if
+some of them think that “hackers” only mean no goodnick and malevolent computer
+intruders. Hackers come in all shapes and sizes - and many of them (including
+Ayn Rand and Jennifer Lawrence) are female.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Was David Jewish and Goliath a Philistine? Did the battle actually happen in
+its form? What really happened to David next? In a true open source fashion,
+the peoples of the Near East gladly borrowed legends and memes from other
+people and improved them, or adapted them to their whims. This is similar to
+how we now create fan fiction (of Star Trek and many other franchises) by
+the droves, or even mix and match many myths - both old and new - or
+share and build upon Chuck Norris facts and similar facts - or whatever. (Only
+now it's in much greater speed and capacity).
+</p>
+
+<h2>The Machines That Can Give You Questions</h2>
+
+<p>
+Back when <a href="http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Pablo_Picasso">Pablo Picasso</a>
+asked for commenting about computers, he said
+“But they are useless. They can only give you answers.” and in a sense he
+was right, because most computers at his time were used for one-off (and
+time-consuming) calculations and simulations. But there was another use of
+computers that was still in its infancy then and unknown: computer networking.
+But as technology improved, it became more and more powerful and pervasive.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+The 1986 film <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jumpin%27_Jack_Flash_%28film%29"><i>Jumpin'
+        Jack Flash</i></a> Starring Whoopi Goldberg (which I highly enjoyed
+and can recommend)
+exemplified the power of early computer communications, though it was
+still in its infancy. The early popular Internet around the late 90s, with
+the so-called <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_1.0">“Web 1.0”</a>
+was a hodgepodge of static web sites (often at Geo Cities), lots of useless or
+incomplete information, search engines that were still not very good, and
+naturally, lots of fan pages of Buffy and Sarah Michelle Gellar (who was the
+Jennifer Lawrence of the time).
+</p>
+
+<p>
+If you wanted an interactive many-to-many discussion, you had to use Usenet,
+or mailing lists, or Internet Relay Chat (IRC), or Slashdot, or whatever.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+That has changed significantly, with the fact that JavaScript matured, wikis,
+web forums and blogs became popular, search engines (most notably Google)
+became better, and, later on, we've seen the rise of web-based social networks
+such as Facebook, Twitter or Google Plus, which provide a more integrated
+and quicker to do experience.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+That does not mean that all the old Internet mediums are dying - mailing lists
+, IRC, and even some Web 1.0 sites (including my own) are still alive and
+kicking, and people now are increasingly using Jabber/XMPP/GTalk/GChat.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Anyway, because computer networking allows humans to communicate with
+other humans, they can provide you with questions. Lots and lots of questions.
+</p>
+
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