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t2/MathVentures/bug_square.html

 
 <CENTER><H2>Bugs in a square</H2></CENTER>
 
-I first encountered this problem in the Science Journal of a laboratory
+I first encountered this problem in the science journal of a laboratory
 building I used to study physics in. It is rather well known, and I found
 some other solutions to it. One used differential equations which is rather
 high stuff. The other is "intuitive", and so lacks enough support, so it

t2/MathVentures/repeating_code.html

-<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
-    "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
-<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
-<head>
-<meta name="generator"
-content="HTML Tidy for Linux/x86 (vers 1st August 2002), see www.w3.org" />
-<title>Math-Ventures: On and on it seems to go...</title>
-</head>
-<body bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
-<center>
-<h2>On and on it seems to go...</h2>
-</center>
-
-A while ago, I was introduced to a couple of questions about
-digital codes being broadcasted. This made me think of a new code
-problem. I thought about it a bit, and saw that I couldn't figure
-out the answer. So, I decided to post it to the Usenet newsgroup
-rec.puzzles which is dedicated to riddles and puzzles of all sorts.
-<p>The original message from Deja-News follows:</p>
-
-<pre>
-<b>Subject:      <font size="+1"
-color="#C60012">Repeating Code Possibilities</font>
-From:         Shlomi Fish &lt;shlomi@medusa.cortext.co.il&gt;
-Date:         1996/06/10
-Message-ID:   &lt;31BC1616.34C6@medusa.cortext.co.il&gt;
-Newsgroups:   rec.puzzles
-<a
-href="http://x10.dejanews.com/getdoc.xp?recnum=9104260&amp;server=db96q2&amp;CONTEXT=882122683.1218314336&amp;hitnum=2&amp;AH=1">[More Headers]</a>
-</b>
-
-I've got a question in combinatorics. Let's suppose that there is a 
-transmitor that trasmits a code repeatedly. Once it reaches the end of 
-the code it immidiately starts broadcasting it again. For example, if 
-the code is 1101 then it will broadast:
-
-11011101110111011101....
-
-There is no way to determine where the code starts, therefore some codes 
-with the same length are equivalent. E.g., 1011 or 1110 are considered 
-identical to 1101.
-
-Keeping that in mind: suppose the code can have n different symbols or 
-digits and is of length l, what is the number of different codes 
-possible?
-
-        Shlomi Fish
-</pre>
-
-A final note about this problem: if a code has an effective
-repetition that is some integer division of l, it's still of length
-l. E.g: the code 10101010... is still considered the 4-bits code
-1010 (or 0101). The continuation which includes the answer can be
-found a couple of pages below. <br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
-<br />
- Well, the rec.puzzles guys did not know how to solve it either,
-and someone suggested that I should post it to sci.math instead.
-<p>Eventually, I had an idea. Like I said, some codes have an
-effective repetition that is some integer division of the given
-code-length. Normal codes have l permutations. For example the code
-'1100' can also be written as '0110', '0011' and '1001'. However,
-codes of one of l's dividers have less permutations. '1010' only
-has two permutations: '1010' and '0101'.</p>
-
-<p>So, I posted the following message to rec.puzzles a couple of
-monthes after my original posting. The solution presented there is
-not intirely correct, so read my notes below.</p>
-
-<pre>
-<b>Subject:      <font size="+1"
-color="#C60012">Repeating Code Riddle (+ Spoiler)</font>
-From:         ffish@euronet.co.il (Shlomi Fish)
-Date:         1996/08/16
-Message-ID:   &lt;4v1nm5$583@shelly.inter.net.il&gt;
-Newsgroups:   rec.puzzles
-<a
-href="http://x10.dejanews.com/getdoc.xp?recnum=7500598&amp;server=db96q3&amp;CONTEXT=882122683.1218314336&amp;hitnum=1&amp;AH=1">[More Headers]</a>
-</b>
-
-I posted this puzzle here some time ago because I didn't know the
-answer. Yet, I managed to figure it out by myself after all so here's
-the spoiler. First, here's the puzzle again:
-
-Let's suppose a transmitter broadcasts a digital code over and over
-without a pause between the end of the code to the beginning of the
-next. Therefore, if the code is 0100 then it will broadcast:
-0100010001000100010001000100010001000100...
-
-Since there is now way to determine where the code begins 0100 is
-equivalent to 1000, 0010 &amp; 0001. Now, let's suppose we broadcast a
-code of length n using b digits, how many different codes can be
-broadcasted using this method?
-
-     Shlomi Fish
-
-(The spoiler is found below)
-
-[Snipped space]
-
-SPOILER:
-
-In this solution I'll focus on the sub-case in which the code is
-binary. I'll later replace all the relevant 2's for b's.
-
-The basis for this solution is the fact that if a sequence has a
-repeating frequency of n then it may have a smaller repeating
-frequency of m only if n is equally divisible by m. (m may be equal to
-1).
-
-Now, the easiest case is the case for prime numbers. A prime number is
-only divisible by 1 therefore the only possible codes with a lesser
-frequency are 111111... and 00000... . That leaves 2^n-2
-position-sensitive permutations. Every code has n such permutations
-which gives us (2^n-2)/n such codes. 
-
-Therefore the total number of codes for a prime number is:
-       2 + (2^n - 2) / n.
-
-The expression 2^n - 2 will prove very useful later on so let's define
-
-T(n) = 2^n - 2.
-
-Now let's suppose there is a number n = p*q where p, q are primes.
-This number will inherit 2 codes from 1 (11111.... and 0000....),
-T(p)/p codes from p, and T(q)/q codes from q. Therefore the original
-permutations are 
-2^(p*q) - 2 - T(p) - T(q) = T(pq) - ( T(p)+T(q) )
-All in all it has:
-        2 + T(p)/p + T(q)/q + [ T(pq) - (T(p)+T(q)) ] / (pq)
-different codes.
-
-Here's another simple example n = p^2 where p is a prime. This number
-will inherit 2 codes from 1, and T(p)/p codes from p. Therefore it
-will have:
-        2 + T(p)/p + [ T(p^2) - T(p) ] / (p^2)
-
-By now a pattern seems to be emerging so here's the solution. Given a
-certain number n then q1, q2, q3....qt will symbolize the numbers
-which equally divide it (excluding 1 and n). Now, let's define O(n)
-as:
-
-       O(n) = [ T(n) - (T(q1) + T(q2) + T(q3) ... + T(qt) ) ] / n
-       ( O(1) = 2)
-
-O(n) denotes the number of codes which are "original" to n and weren't
-inherited from any smaller number.
-
-Now if q1, q2...qt will again stand for the dividers of n then the
-total number of codes n have are:
-
-       A(n) = O(1) + O(q1) + O(q2) + O(q3) + .. + O(qt) + O(n)
-
-
-      Shlomi Fish
-</pre>
-
-Well, I didn't take in mind that a number can indirectly receive
-codes from a divider by two or more other dividers (like 12 that
-gets codes from 2 through both 4 and 6). Thus, O(n) the function
-that denotes the number of "original" codes of n should be
-recursive and defined as following:
-<p><b>O(1) = 2</b><br />
-<b>O(n) = T(n)/n</b> for every prime number n<br />
-<b>O(n) = [ T(n) - (O(q1)*q1 + O(q2)*q2 + .. O(qt)*qt ) ] / n</b>
-for all other numbers<br />
-</p>
-
-<p>Otherwise the solution is fine. You can view a C program that
-calculates the number of such codes for all numbers up to 24 <a
-href="check_codes.c">here</a>.</p>
-
-<hr />
-<h3><a href="./">Back to the Math-Ventures Web page</a></h3>
-
-<h3><a href="../">Back to Shlomi Fish' Homepage</a></h3>
-</body>
-</html>
-

t2/MathVentures/repeating_code.html.wml

+#include '../template.wml'
+
+<subject "On and on it seems to go..." />
+
+A while ago, I was introduced to a couple of questions about
+digital codes being broadcasted. This made me think of a new code
+problem. I thought about it a bit, and saw that I couldn't figure
+out the answer. So, I decided to post it to the Usenet newsgroup
+rec.puzzles which is dedicated to riddles and puzzles of all sorts.
+<p>The original message from Deja-News follows:</p>
+
+<pre>
+<b>Subject:      <span style=" color : #C60012 ; font-size : large ">Repeating Code Possibilities</span>
+From:         Shlomi Fish &lt;shlomi@medusa.cortext.co.il&gt;
+Date:         1996/06/10
+Message-ID:   &lt;31BC1616.34C6@medusa.cortext.co.il&gt;
+Newsgroups:   rec.puzzles
+<a
+href="http://x10.dejanews.com/getdoc.xp?recnum=9104260&amp;server=db96q2&amp;CONTEXT=882122683.1218314336&amp;hitnum=2&amp;AH=1">[More Headers]</a>
+</b>
+
+I've got a question in combinatorics. Let's suppose that there is a 
+transmitor that trasmits a code repeatedly. Once it reaches the end of 
+the code it immidiately starts broadcasting it again. For example, if 
+the code is 1101 then it will broadast:
+
+11011101110111011101....
+
+There is no way to determine where the code starts, therefore some codes 
+with the same length are equivalent. E.g., 1011 or 1110 are considered 
+identical to 1101.
+
+Keeping that in mind: suppose the code can have n different symbols or 
+digits and is of length l, what is the number of different codes 
+possible?
+
+        Shlomi Fish
+</pre>
+
+A final note about this problem: if a code has an effective
+repetition that is some integer division of l, it's still of length
+l. E.g: the code 10101010... is still considered the 4-bits code
+1010 (or 0101). The continuation which includes the answer can be
+found a couple of pages below. <br />
+
+
+<longblank />
+ Well, the rec.puzzles guys did not know how to solve it either,
+and someone suggested that I should post it to sci.math instead.
+<p>Eventually, I had an idea. Like I said, some codes have an
+effective repetition that is some integer division of the given
+code-length. Normal codes have l permutations. For example the code
+'1100' can also be written as '0110', '0011' and '1001'. However,
+codes of one of l's dividers have less permutations. '1010' only
+has two permutations: '1010' and '0101'.</p>
+
+<p>So, I posted the following message to rec.puzzles a couple of
+monthes after my original posting. The solution presented there is
+not intirely correct, so read my notes below.</p>
+
+<pre>
+<b>Subject:      <span style=" color : #C60012 ; font-size : large ">Repeating Code Riddle (+ Spoiler)</span>
+From:         ffish@euronet.co.il (Shlomi Fish)
+Date:         1996/08/16
+Message-ID:   &lt;4v1nm5$583@shelly.inter.net.il&gt;
+Newsgroups:   rec.puzzles
+<a
+href="http://x10.dejanews.com/getdoc.xp?recnum=7500598&amp;server=db96q3&amp;CONTEXT=882122683.1218314336&amp;hitnum=1&amp;AH=1">[More Headers]</a>
+</b>
+
+I posted this puzzle here some time ago because I didn't know the
+answer. Yet, I managed to figure it out by myself after all so here's
+the spoiler. First, here's the puzzle again:
+
+Let's suppose a transmitter broadcasts a digital code over and over
+without a pause between the end of the code to the beginning of the
+next. Therefore, if the code is 0100 then it will broadcast:
+0100010001000100010001000100010001000100...
+
+Since there is now way to determine where the code begins 0100 is
+equivalent to 1000, 0010 &amp; 0001. Now, let's suppose we broadcast a
+code of length n using b digits, how many different codes can be
+broadcasted using this method?
+
+     Shlomi Fish
+
+(The spoiler is found below)
+
+[Snipped space]
+
+SPOILER:
+
+In this solution I'll focus on the sub-case in which the code is
+binary. I'll later replace all the relevant 2's for b's.
+
+The basis for this solution is the fact that if a sequence has a
+repeating frequency of n then it may have a smaller repeating
+frequency of m only if n is equally divisible by m. (m may be equal to
+1).
+
+Now, the easiest case is the case for prime numbers. A prime number is
+only divisible by 1 therefore the only possible codes with a lesser
+frequency are 111111... and 00000... . That leaves 2^n-2
+position-sensitive permutations. Every code has n such permutations
+which gives us (2^n-2)/n such codes. 
+
+Therefore the total number of codes for a prime number is:
+       2 + (2^n - 2) / n.
+
+The expression 2^n - 2 will prove very useful later on so let's define
+
+T(n) = 2^n - 2.
+
+Now let's suppose there is a number n = p*q where p, q are primes.
+This number will inherit 2 codes from 1 (11111.... and 0000....),
+T(p)/p codes from p, and T(q)/q codes from q. Therefore the original
+permutations are 
+2^(p*q) - 2 - T(p) - T(q) = T(pq) - ( T(p)+T(q) )
+All in all it has:
+        2 + T(p)/p + T(q)/q + [ T(pq) - (T(p)+T(q)) ] / (pq)
+different codes.
+
+Here's another simple example n = p^2 where p is a prime. This number
+will inherit 2 codes from 1, and T(p)/p codes from p. Therefore it
+will have:
+        2 + T(p)/p + [ T(p^2) - T(p) ] / (p^2)
+
+By now a pattern seems to be emerging so here's the solution. Given a
+certain number n then q1, q2, q3....qt will symbolize the numbers
+which equally divide it (excluding 1 and n). Now, let's define O(n)
+as:
+
+       O(n) = [ T(n) - (T(q1) + T(q2) + T(q3) ... + T(qt) ) ] / n
+       ( O(1) = 2)
+
+O(n) denotes the number of codes which are "original" to n and weren't
+inherited from any smaller number.
+
+Now if q1, q2...qt will again stand for the dividers of n then the
+total number of codes n have are:
+
+       A(n) = O(1) + O(q1) + O(q2) + O(q3) + .. + O(qt) + O(n)
+
+
+      Shlomi Fish
+</pre>
+
+Well, I didn't take in mind that a number can indirectly receive
+codes from a divider by two or more other dividers (like 12 that
+gets codes from 2 through both 4 and 6). Thus, O(n) the function
+that denotes the number of "original" codes of n should be
+recursive and defined as following:
+<p><b>O(1) = 2</b><br />
+<b>O(n) = T(n)/n</b> for every prime number n<br />
+<b>O(n) = [ T(n) - (O(q1)*q1 + O(q2)*q2 + .. O(qt)*qt ) ] / n</b>
+for all other numbers<br />
+</p>
+
+<p>Otherwise the solution is fine. You can view a C program that
+calculates the number of such codes for all numbers up to 24 <a
+href="check_codes.c">here</a>.</p>
+

t2/jmikmod/index.html

-<HTML>
-<TITLE>MikMod for Java</TITLE>
-<BODY BGCOLOR="#FFFFFF">
-
-<H2>MikMod for Java</H2>
-
-Well, here it is: the long awaited (yeah right) Java port of MikMod.
-You can download it <A HREF="jmm-24.04.98.zip">here</A>.<P>
-
-Right now, the archive contains a JDK 1.0.2 code, which can still
-compile on versions 1.1.x of the JDK, with some compiler warnings.
-The "native" sound driver source inside will only compile and work on
-Linux and v. 1.0.2 of the JDK.<P>
-
-You can find more information about MikMod for Java in the 
-<A HREF="README.java.txt">readme
-file</A>.<P>
-
-<p>
-Like I say there, I would be happy to let another person
-coordinate and maintain this project instead of me. One thing one should do
-is port it to Java 2 and to its audio playback subsystem. Maybe one day it
-would be able to run as an applet without messing with the Java Virtual 
-Macgine, but so far it can only run from the command-line.
-</p>
-
-The main MikMod page is:<BR>
-<A HREF="http://www.mikmod.org/">The MikMod and libmikmod Homepage</A><BR>
-<BR>
-Some older pages which may be still be of interest are:<BR>
-<A HREF="http://www.stack.nl/~mikmak/mikmod.htm">The Original MikMod Home Page
-by Jean-Paul Mikkers</A><BR>
-<A HREF="http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~stevem/mikmod/">Steve's MikMod Page</A><BR>
-<A HREF="http://www.freenet.tlh.fl.us/~amstpi/mikmod.html">MikMod for UNIX</A><BR>
-<P>
-
-You can E-mail me at <A HREF="mailto:shlomif@t2.technion.ac.il">shlomif@t2.technion.ac.il</A> 
-for extra questions or comments.<P>
-
-Enjoy!
-
-<BR><BR>
-<HR>
-<DIV ALIGN=RIGHT>
-<A HREF="../"><IMG SRC="../images/bk2hp.gif" BORDER=0 ALT="Back to my home page"></A>
-</DIV>
-
-</BODY>

t2/jmikmod/index.html.wml

+#include '../template.wml'
+
+<subject "MikMod for Java" />
+
+<p>
+Well, here it is: the long awaited (yeah right) Java port of MikMod.
+You can download it <a href="jmm-24.04.98.zip">here</a>.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Right now, the archive contains a JDK 1.0.2 code, which can still
+compile on versions 1.1.x of the JDK, with some compiler warnings.
+The "native" sound driver source inside will only compile and work on
+Linux and v. 1.0.2 of the JDK.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+You can find more information about MikMod for Java in the 
+<a href="README.java.txt">readme
+file</a>.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Like I say there, I would be happy to let another person
+coordinate and maintain this project instead of me. One thing one should do
+is port it to Java 2 and to its audio playback subsystem. Maybe one day it
+would be able to run as an applet without messing with the Java Virtual 
+Macgine, but so far it can only run from the command-line.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+The main MikMod page is:<br />
+<a href="http://www.mikmod.org/">The MikMod and libmikmod Homepage</a>
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Some older pages which may still be of interest are:<br />
+<a href="http://www.stack.nl/~mikmak/mikmod.htm">The Original MikMod Home Page
+by Jean-Paul Mikkers</a><br />
+<a href="http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~stevem/mikmod/">Steve's MikMod Page</a><br />
+<a href="http://www.freenet.tlh.fl.us/~amstpi/mikmod.html">MikMod for UNIX</a><br />
+</p>
+
+<p>
+You can E-mail me at <email:link "shlomif@vipe.technion.ac.il" />
+for extra questions or comments.
+</p>
+
+<p>
+Enjoy!
+</p>

t2/open-source/index.html.wml

 An automatic solver for <a href="http://www.logicmazes.com/">Logc Mazes</a> written in Perl
 </p>
 
+<h2>Software Resources</h2>
+
+<div class="indent">
+
+<h3><linkto:vipe where="abstraction/">Cross-Platform Abstraction Libraries for Portability</linkto:vipe></h3>
+
+<p>
+A small directory of libraries that make writing applications that run on 
+UNIXes as well as on Windows 32-bit easier.
+</p>
+
+<h3><linkto:vipe where="software-tools/">Software Building and Management Tools</linkto:vipe></h3>
+
+<p>
+A small directory of tools for building, configuring and maintaining software.
+</p>
+
+<h3><a href="http://better-scm.berlios.de/">The "Better SCM" Initiative</a></h3>
+
+<p>
+An initiative meant to advance the projects that aim to create publicly 
+available better tools for revision control.
+</p>
+
+</div>
+
+
 #include '../template.wml'
 
-<HTML>
-<TITLE>IRPWUG Announces Project WYSIWYT</TITLE>
-<BODY BGCOLOR="#FFFFFF">
+<subject "IRPWUG Announces Project &quot;What you see is what you think&quot;" />
 
-<H2>IRPWUG Announces Project "What you see is what you think"</H2>
-
-<B>IRPWUG</B>, short for "International Really Pissed-off Win95 Users' Group"
+<p>
+<b>IRPWUG</b>, short for "International Really Pissed-off Win95 Users' Group"
 is a non-profit organization which 90% of all worldwide users of MS-Windows 95
 are registered as its members. (Of the remaining users, 9% are
 registered in IPWUG. The other 1% could not register into either
 organization because they are hospitalized in psychiatric hospitals around
-the world. )<P>
+the world. )
+</p>
 
+<p>
 IRPWUG is proud to announce today the official opening of its latest
-project <B>What you see is what you think</B> or <B>WYSIWYT</B> for short. This 
+project <b>What you see is what you think</b> or <b>WYSIWYT</b> for short. This 
 project, which is already in advanced development stages, aims at giving 
 Windows 95 a look and usability features that will better reflect the way its 
 users feel about it. As our project leader Evan "Wind" Oz commented: "Even the 
 Jewish religion bans men from wearing women clothes and the opposite. I don't 
 always follow this regulation, but even I don't dress like a woman during work 
 hours. We should expect an OS to behave the same and not to disguise as
-something eles."<P>
+something eles."
+</p>
 
+<p>
 Phil Waters, another distinguished and active member in IRPWUG also
 commented on the project: "Windows 95 users feel, on a day-to-day basis the
 urge to reach their hand into the computer and physically remove KRNL32.DLL
 from the hard-disk. This project will, hopefully, prevent a lot of that
 constant frustration." WYSIWYT will span a large number of sub-projects that will one-by-one
-advance its noble purpose. Here is a partial list of projects underway:<P>
+advance its noble purpose. Here is a partial list of projects underway:
+</p>
 
-<UL>
-<LI><B>The New Desktop Order</B> - this project will hack the Win95 kernel so
+<ul>
+<li><b>The New Desktop Order</b> - this project will hack the Win95 kernel so
 the operating system's windows will look more appropriate to their context.
 Their borders are planned to be visualized as if they were drawn by pencil
 while using a 4 cm long ruler. Like real-life windows, they will become
-dirty and broken as time goes by.<P>
+dirty and broken as time goes by.
+</li>
 
-<LI><B>Improvement to Windows fonts</B> - a new font labeled "Times and again Roman"
+<li><p><b>Improvement to Windows fonts</b> - a new font labeled "Times and again Roman"
 is now available for installation. This font looks much like "Times New
 Roman" except for some important alteration. Among other adjustments, the
 lowercase and capital 'O's were added a small beard and a hat, the lowercase
 l now resembles a Chinese letter, and the uppercase 'T' has a pole that is
-roughly one-quarter the length of its hat.<P>
+roughly one-quarter the length of its hat.
+</p>
 
+<p>
 Other fonts planned are "Arielle", a font that doesn't have any serifs but
 doesn't have many main-letter marks either, and BillScript, a connected font
 based on the hand-writing of Bill Gates himself. Beta testers of the latter
 reported that is was more readable than the English hand-writing of both Yassir
-Arafaat and Refa'el Eitan.<P>
+Arafaat and Refa'el Eitan.
+</p>
+</li>
 
-<LI><B>A Suitable User Interface</B> - WYSIWYT plans a corresponding
+
+<li><b>A Suitable User Interface</b> - WYSIWYT plans a corresponding
 new user-interface to be available to Windows 95 users. In the new user
 interface, the programs' menus will be placed on the windows' bottom or
 right side (user-configurable) and will present the items in as many columns
 provide the "Icon War-lock", a state of the art utility which will implement the latest
 breakthroughs in computerized sight and artificial intelligence, and will help the
 users figure out what the symbol on each one of the icons stands for. (that is, if
-it can decipher them itself)<P>
+it can decipher them itself)
+</li>
 
-<LI><B>Better Windows 95 Internationalization</B> - WYSIWYT is working on versions
+<li><p><b>Better Windows 95 Internationalization</b> - WYSIWYT is working on versions
 of Windows 95 for languages such as Ancient Egyptian, Babylonian and
 Clingon. Users of the Hebrew version of Win95, who beta-tested the
 Babylonian version reported that they found it much better, as far as the
 right-to-left handling was concerned. They expressed a wish to switch to the 
-Windows 95 with Babylonian support, once its stable version is released.<P>
+Windows 95 with Babylonian support, once its stable version is released.
+</p>
 
+<p>
 When one of them was asked whether it wouldn't be a bother for the other
 people who are working with him and don't know Babylonian, he answered:
 "I've talked to the guys in the office and they told me they are willing to
 take the one semester Babylonian course in the University if it would make
 their Windows sessions easier. We tried to get used to Hebrew Win95 for two
-years now, and we haven't been successful yet."<P>
+years now, and we haven't been successful yet."
+</p>
 
+<p>
 Users of the Russian version seem to be attracted to our upcoming Clingon
 Win95, while some Chinese users prefer the Egyptian version, because the
-fonts there are much smaller in file size.<P>
+fonts there are much smaller in file size.
+</p>
+</li>
 
-<LI><B>Suggested Improvements to the Documentation</B> - the WYSIWYT project was
+<li>
+<p>
+<b>Suggested Improvements to the Documentation</b> - the WYSIWYT project was
 for a long time fascinated by Microsoft's tremendous desire to advance its
 Internet Explorer web-browser. We saw the fact that they switched the help 
 systems of the upcoming Windows 98, as well as Microsoft Visual C++ 5.0, to 
-HTML a major step in advancing our project. <P>
+HTML a major step in advancing our project.
+</p>
 
+<p>
 As a complementary step, some of the chief heads of our project suggested
 that the Windows' manuals themselves, as well as all of Microsoft's ads,
 will be designed in HTML and printed after being rendered by IE4. While this
 project is in the preliminary and planning stages, we expect it to acquire a
-large momentum soon.<P>
+large momentum soon.
+</p>
+</li>
 
-<LI><B>Accesibility Features</B> - it is one of our topmost goals to make
+<LI><b>Accesibility Features</b> - it is one of our topmost goals to make
 MS-Windows 95 more accesible for people with various disabilities than it is
 today. At the moment, work is carried out on making Win95 usable by men and
 women of inadequate intelligence (I.Q. 250 and less) and by people who
 have an extremely low ammount of patience. Thus, people who wish to
 spend more time doing actual work than doing system maintainance, may
 eventually be able to use this OS. 
+</li>
 
 </UL>
 
-<B>To be continued...</B>
-
-
-
-<BR><BR>
-<HR>
-Designed by Shlomi Fish, <A HREF="mailto:shlomif@iglu.org.il">shlomif@iglu.org.il</A><BR>
-<BR>
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