django / docs / django-admin.txt

===========================
The django-admin.py utility
===========================

``django-admin.py`` is Django's command-line utility for administrative tasks.
This document outlines all it can do.

The ``django-admin.py`` script should be on your system path if you installed
Django via its ``setup.py`` utility. If it's not on your path, you can find it in
``site-packages/django/bin`` within your Python installation. Consider
symlinking to it from some place on your path, such as ``/usr/local/bin``.

In addition, ``manage.py`` is automatically created in each Django project.
``manage.py`` is a thin wrapper around ``django-admin.py`` that takes care of
two things for you before delegating to ``django-admin.py``:

    * It puts your project's package on ``sys.path``.

    * It sets the ``DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE`` environment variable so that it
      points to your project's ``settings.py`` file.

Generally, when working on a single Django project, it's easier to use
``manage.py``. Use ``django-admin.py`` with ``DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE``, or the
``--settings`` command line option, if you need to switch between multiple
Django settings files.

Usage
=====

``django-admin.py action [options]``

``manage.py action [options]``

``action`` should be one of the actions listed in this document. ``options``,
which is optional, should be zero or more of the options listed in this
document.

Run ``django-admin.py --help`` to display a help message that includes a terse
list of all available actions and options.

Most actions take a list of "modelmodule"s. A "modelmodule," in this case, is
the name of a file containing Django models. For example, if you have a model
module called ``myproject/apps/polls/pollmodels.py``, the "modelmodule" in this
case would be ``"pollmodels"``.

Available actions
=================

adminindex [modelmodule modelmodule ...]
----------------------------------------

Prints the admin-index template snippet for the given model module(s).

Use admin-index template snippets if you want to customize the look and feel of
your admin's index page. See `Tutorial 2`_ for more information.

.. _Tutorial 2: http://www.djangoproject.com/documentation/tutorial2/

createcachetable [tablename]
----------------------------

Creates a cache table named ``tablename`` for use with the database cache
backend.  See the `cache documentation`_ for more information.

.. _cache documentation: http://www.djangoproject.com/documentation/cache/

createsuperuser
---------------

Creates a superuser account interactively. It asks you for a username, e-mail
address and password.

You can specify ``username email password`` on the command line, for convenient
use in shell scripts. Example::

    django-admin.py createsuperuser john john@example.com mypassword

init
----

Initializes the database with the tables and data Django needs by default.
Specifically, these are the database tables from the ``auth`` and ``core``
models.

inspectdb [dbname]
------------------

Introspects the database tables in the given database and outputs a Django
model module to standard output.

Use this if you have a legacy database with which you'd like to use Django.
The script will inspect the database and create a model for each table within
it.

This feature is meant as a shortcut, not as definitive model generation. After
you run it, you'll want to look over the generated models yourself to make
customizations. In particular, you'll need to do this:

    * Rearrange models' order, so that models that refer to other models are
      ordered properly.
    * Add ``primary_key=True`` to one field in each model. The ``inspectdb``
      doesn't yet introspect primary keys.

``inspectdb`` works with PostgreSQL, MySQL and SQLite. Foreign-key detection
only works in PostgreSQL.

install [modelmodule modelmodule ...]
-------------------------------------

Executes the equivalent of ``sqlall`` for the given model module(s).

installperms [modelmodule modelmodule ...]
------------------------------------------

Installs any admin permissions for the given model module(s) that aren't
already installed in the database. Outputs a message telling how many
permissions were added, if any.

runserver [optional port number, or ipaddr:port]
------------------------------------------------

Starts a lightweight development Web server on the local machine. By default,
the server runs on port 8000 on the IP address 127.0.0.1. You can pass in an
IP address and port number explicitly.

If you run this script as a user with normal privileges (recommended), you
might not have access to start a port on a low port number. Low port numbers
are reserved for superusers (root).

DO NOT USE THIS SERVER IN A PRODUCTION SETTING.

The development server automatically reloads Python code for each request, as
needed. You don't need to restart the server for code changes to take effect.

When you start the server, and each time you change Python code while the
server is running, the server will validate all of your installed models. (See
the "validate" option below.) If the validator finds errors, it will print
them to standard output, but it won't stop the server.

You can run as many servers as you want, as long as they're on separate ports.
Just execute ``django-admin.py runserver`` more than once.

Note that the default IP address, 127.0.0.1, is not accessible from other
machines on your network. To make your development server viewable to other
machines on the network, use its own IP address (e.g. ``192.168.2.1``) or
``0.0.0.0``.

Examples:
~~~~~~~~~

Port 7000 on IP address 127.0.0.1::

    django-admin.py runserver 7000

Port 7000 on IP address 1.2.3.4::

    django-admin.py runserver 1.2.3.4:7000

sql [modelmodule modelmodule ...]
---------------------------------

Prints the CREATE TABLE SQL statements for the given model module(s).

sqlall [modelmodule modelmodule ...]
------------------------------------

Prints the CREATE TABLE and initial-data SQL statements for the given model module(s).

sqlclear [modelmodule modelmodule ...]
--------------------------------------

Prints the DROP TABLE SQL statements for the given model module(s).

sqlindexes [modelmodule modelmodule ...]
----------------------------------------

Prints the CREATE INDEX SQL statements for the given model module(s).

sqlinitialdata [modelmodule modelmodule ...]
--------------------------------------------

Prints the initial INSERT SQL statements for the given model module(s).

sqlreset [modelmodule modelmodule ...]
--------------------------------------

Prints the DROP TABLE SQL, then the CREATE TABLE SQL, for the given model module(s).

sqlsequencereset [modelmodule modelmodule ...]
----------------------------------------------

Prints the SQL statements for resetting PostgreSQL sequences for the given
model module(s).

See http://simon.incutio.com/archive/2004/04/21/postgres for more information.

startapp [appname]
------------------

Creates a Django app directory structure for the given app name in the current
directory.

startproject [projectname]
--------------------------

Creates a Django project directory structure for the given project name in the
current directory.

validate
--------

Validates all installed models (according to the ``INSTALLED_APPS`` setting)
and prints validation errors to standard output.

Available options
=================

--settings
----------

Example usage::

    django-admin.py init --settings=myproject.settings

Explicitly specifies the settings module to use. The settings module should be
in Python path syntax, e.g. "myproject.settings". If this isn't provided,
``django-admin.py`` will use the DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE environment variable.

Note that this option is unnecessary in ``manage.py``, because it takes care of
setting ``DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE`` for you.

--pythonpath
------------

Example usage::

    django-admin.py init --pythonpath='/home/djangoprojects/myproject'

Adds the given filesystem path to the Python `import search path`_. If this
isn't provided, ``django-admin.py`` will use the ``PYTHONPATH`` environment
variable.

Note that this option is unnecessary in ``manage.py``, because it takes care of
setting the Python path for you.

.. _import search path: http://diveintopython.org/getting_to_know_python/everything_is_an_object.html

--help
------

Displays a help message that includes a terse list of all available actions and
options.
Tip: Filter by directory path e.g. /media app.js to search for public/media/app.js.
Tip: Use camelCasing e.g. ProjME to search for ProjectModifiedEvent.java.
Tip: Filter by extension type e.g. /repo .js to search for all .js files in the /repo directory.
Tip: Separate your search with spaces e.g. /ssh pom.xml to search for src/ssh/pom.xml.
Tip: Use ↑ and ↓ arrow keys to navigate and return to view the file.
Tip: You can also navigate files with Ctrl+j (next) and Ctrl+k (previous) and view the file with Ctrl+o.
Tip: You can also navigate files with Alt+j (next) and Alt+k (previous) and view the file with Alt+o.