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Merge branch 'tr/rfc-reset-doc' into maint

* tr/rfc-reset-doc:
Documentation/reset: move "undo permanently" example behind "make topic"
Documentation/reset: reorder examples to match description
Documentation/reset: promote 'examples' one section up
Documentation/reset: separate options by mode
Documentation/git-reset: reorder modes for soft-mixed-hard progression

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Documentation/git-reset.txt

 SYNOPSIS
 --------
 [verse]
-'git reset' [--mixed | --soft | --hard | --merge | --keep] [-q] [<commit>]
 'git reset' [-q] [<commit>] [--] <paths>...
 'git reset' --patch [<commit>] [--] [<paths>...]
+'git reset' [--soft | --mixed | --hard | --merge | --keep] [-q] [<commit>]
 
 DESCRIPTION
 -----------
-Sets the current head to the specified commit and optionally resets the
-index and working tree to match.
-
-This command is useful if you notice some small error in a recent
-commit (or set of commits) and want to redo that part without showing
-the undo in the history.
-
-If you want to undo a commit other than the latest on a branch,
-linkgit:git-revert[1] is your friend.
-
-The second and third forms with 'paths' and/or --patch are used to
-revert selected paths in the index from a given commit, without moving
-HEAD.
-
+In the first and second form, copy entries from <commit> to the index.
+In the third form, set the current branch to <commit>, optionally
+modifying index and worktree to match.  The <commit> defaults to HEAD
+in all forms.
+
+'git reset' [-q] [<commit>] [--] <paths>...::
+	This form resets the index entries for all <paths> to their
+	state at the <commit>.  (It does not affect the worktree, nor
+	the current branch.)
++
+This means that `git reset <paths>` is the opposite of `git add
+<paths>`.
 
-OPTIONS
--------
---mixed::
-	Resets the index but not the working tree (i.e., the changed files
-	are preserved but not marked for commit) and reports what has not
-	been updated. This is the default action.
+'git reset' --patch|-p [<commit>] [--] [<paths>...]::
+	Interactively select hunks in the difference between the index
+	and <commit> (defaults to HEAD).  The chosen hunks are applied
+	in reverse to the index.
++
+This means that `git reset -p` is the opposite of `git add -p` (see
+linkgit:git-add[1]).
 
+'git reset' [--<mode>] [<commit>]::
+	This form points the current branch to <commit> and then
+	updates index and working tree according to <mode>, which must
+	be one of the following:
++
+--
 --soft::
 	Does not touch the index file nor the working tree at all, but
 	requires them to be in a good order. This leaves all your changed
 	files "Changes to be committed", as 'git status' would
 	put it.
 
+--mixed::
+	Resets the index but not the working tree (i.e., the changed files
+	are preserved but not marked for commit) and reports what has not
+	been updated. This is the default action.
+
 --hard::
 	Matches the working tree and index to that of the tree being
 	switched to. Any changes to tracked files in the working tree
 	the given commit.  If a file that is different between the
 	current commit and the given commit has local changes, reset
 	is aborted.
+--
 
--p::
---patch::
-	Interactively select hunks in the difference between the index
-	and <commit> (defaults to HEAD).  The chosen hunks are applied
-	in reverse to the index.
-+
-This means that `git reset -p` is the opposite of `git add -p` (see
-linkgit:git-add[1]).
+If you want to undo a commit other than the latest on a branch,
+linkgit:git-revert[1] is your friend.
+
+
+OPTIONS
+-------
 
 -q::
 --quiet::
 	Be quiet, only report errors.
 
-<commit>::
-	Commit to make the current HEAD. If not given defaults to HEAD.
-
-DISCUSSION
-----------
 
-The tables below show what happens when running:
-
-----------
-git reset --option target
-----------
-
-to reset the HEAD to another commit (`target`) with the different
-reset options depending on the state of the files.
-
-In these tables, A, B, C and D are some different states of a
-file. For example, the first line of the first table means that if a
-file is in state A in the working tree, in state B in the index, in
-state C in HEAD and in state D in the target, then "git reset --soft
-target" will put the file in state A in the working tree, in state B
-in the index and in state D in HEAD.
-
-      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
-      ----------------------------------------------------
-       A       B     C    D     --soft   A       B     D
-				--mixed  A       D     D
-				--hard   D       D     D
-				--merge (disallowed)
-				--keep  (disallowed)
-
-      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
-      ----------------------------------------------------
-       A       B     C    C     --soft   A       B     C
-				--mixed  A       C     C
-				--hard   C       C     C
-				--merge (disallowed)
-				--keep   A       C     C
-
-      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
-      ----------------------------------------------------
-       B       B     C    D     --soft   B       B     D
-				--mixed  B       D     D
-				--hard   D       D     D
-				--merge  D       D     D
-				--keep  (disallowed)
-
-      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
-      ----------------------------------------------------
-       B       B     C    C     --soft   B       B     C
-				--mixed  B       C     C
-				--hard   C       C     C
-				--merge  C       C     C
-				--keep   B       C     C
-
-      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
-      ----------------------------------------------------
-       B       C     C    D     --soft   B       C     D
-				--mixed  B       D     D
-				--hard   D       D     D
-				--merge (disallowed)
-				--keep  (disallowed)
-
-      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
-      ----------------------------------------------------
-       B       C     C    C     --soft   B       C     C
-				--mixed  B       C     C
-				--hard   C       C     C
-				--merge  B       C     C
-				--keep   B       C     C
-
-"reset --merge" is meant to be used when resetting out of a conflicted
-merge. Any mergy operation guarantees that the work tree file that is
-involved in the merge does not have local change wrt the index before
-it starts, and that it writes the result out to the work tree. So if
-we see some difference between the index and the target and also
-between the index and the work tree, then it means that we are not
-resetting out from a state that a mergy operation left after failing
-with a conflict. That is why we disallow --merge option in this case.
-
-"reset --keep" is meant to be used when removing some of the last
-commits in the current branch while keeping changes in the working
-tree. If there could be conflicts between the changes in the commit we
-want to remove and the changes in the working tree we want to keep,
-the reset is disallowed. That's why it is disallowed if there are both
-changes between the working tree and HEAD, and between HEAD and the
-target. To be safe, it is also disallowed when there are unmerged
-entries.
-
-The following tables show what happens when there are unmerged
-entries:
-
-      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
-      ----------------------------------------------------
-       X       U     A    B     --soft  (disallowed)
-				--mixed  X       B     B
-				--hard   B       B     B
-				--merge  B       B     B
-				--keep  (disallowed)
-
-      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
-      ----------------------------------------------------
-       X       U     A    A     --soft  (disallowed)
-				--mixed  X       A     A
-				--hard   A       A     A
-				--merge  A       A     A
-				--keep  (disallowed)
-
-X means any state and U means an unmerged index.
-
-Examples
+EXAMPLES
 --------
 
+Undo add::
++
+------------
+$ edit                                     <1>
+$ git add frotz.c filfre.c
+$ mailx                                    <2>
+$ git reset                                <3>
+$ git pull git://info.example.com/ nitfol  <4>
+------------
++
+<1> You are happily working on something, and find the changes
+in these files are in good order.  You do not want to see them
+when you run "git diff", because you plan to work on other files
+and changes with these files are distracting.
+<2> Somebody asks you to pull, and the changes sounds worthy of merging.
+<3> However, you already dirtied the index (i.e. your index does
+not match the HEAD commit).  But you know the pull you are going
+to make does not affect frotz.c nor filfre.c, so you revert the
+index changes for these two files.  Your changes in working tree
+remain there.
+<4> Then you can pull and merge, leaving frotz.c and filfre.c
+changes still in the working tree.
+
 Undo a commit and redo::
 +
 ------------
 +
 See also the --amend option to linkgit:git-commit[1].
 
-Undo commits permanently::
-+
-------------
-$ git commit ...
-$ git reset --hard HEAD~3   <1>
-------------
-+
-<1> The last three commits (HEAD, HEAD^, and HEAD~2) were bad
-and you do not want to ever see them again.  Do *not* do this if
-you have already given these commits to somebody else.  (See the
-"RECOVERING FROM UPSTREAM REBASE" section in linkgit:git-rebase[1] for
-the implications of doing so.)
-
 Undo a commit, making it a topic branch::
 +
 ------------
 <2> Rewind the master branch to get rid of those three commits.
 <3> Switch to "topic/wip" branch and keep working.
 
-Undo add::
+Undo commits permanently::
 +
 ------------
-$ edit                                     <1>
-$ git add frotz.c filfre.c
-$ mailx                                    <2>
-$ git reset                                <3>
-$ git pull git://info.example.com/ nitfol  <4>
+$ git commit ...
+$ git reset --hard HEAD~3   <1>
 ------------
 +
-<1> You are happily working on something, and find the changes
-in these files are in good order.  You do not want to see them
-when you run "git diff", because you plan to work on other files
-and changes with these files are distracting.
-<2> Somebody asks you to pull, and the changes sounds worthy of merging.
-<3> However, you already dirtied the index (i.e. your index does
-not match the HEAD commit).  But you know the pull you are going
-to make does not affect frotz.c nor filfre.c, so you revert the
-index changes for these two files.  Your changes in working tree
-remain there.
-<4> Then you can pull and merge, leaving frotz.c and filfre.c
-changes still in the working tree.
+<1> The last three commits (HEAD, HEAD^, and HEAD~2) were bad
+and you do not want to ever see them again.  Do *not* do this if
+you have already given these commits to somebody else.  (See the
+"RECOVERING FROM UPSTREAM REBASE" section in linkgit:git-rebase[1] for
+the implications of doing so.)
 
 Undo a merge or pull::
 +
 <3> But you can use "reset --keep" to remove the unwanted commit after
     you switched to "branch2".
 
+
+DISCUSSION
+----------
+
+The tables below show what happens when running:
+
+----------
+git reset --option target
+----------
+
+to reset the HEAD to another commit (`target`) with the different
+reset options depending on the state of the files.
+
+In these tables, A, B, C and D are some different states of a
+file. For example, the first line of the first table means that if a
+file is in state A in the working tree, in state B in the index, in
+state C in HEAD and in state D in the target, then "git reset --soft
+target" will put the file in state A in the working tree, in state B
+in the index and in state D in HEAD.
+
+      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
+      ----------------------------------------------------
+       A       B     C    D     --soft   A       B     D
+				--mixed  A       D     D
+				--hard   D       D     D
+				--merge (disallowed)
+				--keep  (disallowed)
+
+      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
+      ----------------------------------------------------
+       A       B     C    C     --soft   A       B     C
+				--mixed  A       C     C
+				--hard   C       C     C
+				--merge (disallowed)
+				--keep   A       C     C
+
+      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
+      ----------------------------------------------------
+       B       B     C    D     --soft   B       B     D
+				--mixed  B       D     D
+				--hard   D       D     D
+				--merge  D       D     D
+				--keep  (disallowed)
+
+      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
+      ----------------------------------------------------
+       B       B     C    C     --soft   B       B     C
+				--mixed  B       C     C
+				--hard   C       C     C
+				--merge  C       C     C
+				--keep   B       C     C
+
+      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
+      ----------------------------------------------------
+       B       C     C    D     --soft   B       C     D
+				--mixed  B       D     D
+				--hard   D       D     D
+				--merge (disallowed)
+				--keep  (disallowed)
+
+      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
+      ----------------------------------------------------
+       B       C     C    C     --soft   B       C     C
+				--mixed  B       C     C
+				--hard   C       C     C
+				--merge  B       C     C
+				--keep   B       C     C
+
+"reset --merge" is meant to be used when resetting out of a conflicted
+merge. Any mergy operation guarantees that the work tree file that is
+involved in the merge does not have local change wrt the index before
+it starts, and that it writes the result out to the work tree. So if
+we see some difference between the index and the target and also
+between the index and the work tree, then it means that we are not
+resetting out from a state that a mergy operation left after failing
+with a conflict. That is why we disallow --merge option in this case.
+
+"reset --keep" is meant to be used when removing some of the last
+commits in the current branch while keeping changes in the working
+tree. If there could be conflicts between the changes in the commit we
+want to remove and the changes in the working tree we want to keep,
+the reset is disallowed. That's why it is disallowed if there are both
+changes between the working tree and HEAD, and between HEAD and the
+target. To be safe, it is also disallowed when there are unmerged
+entries.
+
+The following tables show what happens when there are unmerged
+entries:
+
+      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
+      ----------------------------------------------------
+       X       U     A    B     --soft  (disallowed)
+				--mixed  X       B     B
+				--hard   B       B     B
+				--merge  B       B     B
+				--keep  (disallowed)
+
+      working index HEAD target         working index HEAD
+      ----------------------------------------------------
+       X       U     A    A     --soft  (disallowed)
+				--mixed  X       A     A
+				--hard   A       A     A
+				--merge  A       A     A
+				--keep  (disallowed)
+
+X means any state and U means an unmerged index.
+
+
 Author
 ------
 Written by Junio C Hamano <gitster@pobox.com> and Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>