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Anonymous committed 369ad65

index, basic: small grammar corrections

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    ? hello.txt
 
 The reply tells us that ``hello.txt`` is unknown to Mercurial, i.e.,
-it is not yet tracked. This is just like, say, Subversion. We can add
-the file:
+it is not yet tracked. We can add the file:
 
 .. shelltest::
    :name: alice
    (run 'hg heads' to see heads, 'hg merge' to merge)
    $ ## snap-tortoisehg "$DSTDIR/alice-heads.png"
 
-What happened? A mentioned above, a "head" changeset is a changeset
+What happened? As mentioned above, a "head" changeset is a changeset
 without any children. Since Alice and Bob have made *different*
 changes based on ``51b2976b01e8``, there are now two changesets in the
 repository without any children. These heads are divergent lines of
 Exercises
 ---------
 
-1. Create a repository and make a couple of commits inside it.
+#. Create a repository and make a couple of commits inside it.
 
-2. Make two clones of your repository. Notice how the ``.hg/hgrc``
+#. Make two clones of your repository. Notice how the ``.hg/hgrc``
    file records the location of the original repository. The `hg
    paths` command will show you the paths defined.
 
-2. Add another path to ``.hg/hgrc``, such as::
+#. Add another path to ``.hg/hgrc``, such as::
 
      bob = /home/bob/test
 
    etc. It is a good idea to add shortcuts for people you collaborate
    with often.
 
-3. Experiment with pulling and pushing changes. Note how the working
+#. Experiment with pulling and pushing changes. Note how the working
    directory is not changed even though history is added to the
    repository. The working copy parent revision is only changed with
    `hg update`.
 exchanging changesets in what is called *bundles*. A bundle is a
 compressed, binary representation of a number of changesets.
 
-1. Create a new changeset in one of your repositories. Use `hg bundle
+#. Create a new changeset in one of your repositories. Use `hg bundle
    --base X out.bundle` to create a bundle in ``out.bundle`` that
    contains all changesets following ``X``. The idea is that you
    record somewhere the last known shared changeset between you and
    the target, and use that as the base.
 
-2. Go to the target repository and use `hg unbundle` to import the
+#. Go to the target repository and use `hg unbundle` to import the
    changesets from the bundle. In this example you will most likely
    have both repositories on your own machine, but in reality the two
    repositories could be on machines that are never online at the same
 
 You can also publish your repository via HTTP:
 
-1. Execute `hg serve` in a repository. You can now access the
+#. Execute `hg serve` in a repository. You can now access the
    repository in a browser with ``http://localhost:8000``. Try to
    start a server for both Alice's and Bob's repository.
 
-2. Try to pull from a repository published with `hg serve`.
+#. Try to pull from a repository published with `hg serve`.
 
 Note `hg serve` is intended for ad-hoc publishing. For permanent
 publishing you can for example use Apache with the ``hgweb.cgi``
   how to best cache your credentials for each type of URL.
 
 `Interacting with Subversion`__:
-  Mercurial is can be used as a client for Subversion. This
+  Mercurial can be used as a client for Subversion. This
   immediately gives you all the benefits of Mercurial: improved
   performance and offline commits.